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Writers of South Asian descent have been garnering more and more success, acclaim, and attention. Story-Wallah gathers the finest South Asian voices in fiction for the first time in a single volume. As Shyam Selvadurai writes in his introduction, "The stories jostle up against each other . . . The effect is a marvelous cacophony that reminds me of . . . one of those South Writers of South Asian descent have been garnering more and more success, acclaim, and attention. Story-Wallah gathers the finest South Asian voices in fiction for the first time in a single volume. As Shyam Selvadurai writes in his introduction, "The stories jostle up against each other . . . The effect is a marvelous cacophony that reminds me of . . . one of those South Asian bazaars, a bargaining, carnival-like milieu. The goods on sale in this instance being stories hawked by story-traders: story-wallahs." In this book, some of the world's best fiction writers hawk their wares from different parts of the South Asian diaspora -- Sri Lanka, India, the United States, Great Britain, Guyana, Malaysia, Trinidad, Fiji -- creating a virtual map of the world with their tales. These stories explore universal themes of identity, culture, and home, and Story-Wallah includes a rich array of experiences: a honeymoon in Sri Lanka, the trials of a Bangladeshi refugee in England, life on a sugar plantation in Trinidad, the attempts of an Indian family to arrange a marriage for their rebellious daughter. This anthology is essential reading for anyone with an interest in South Asian writers and the dynamic, important tales they have to tell.


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Writers of South Asian descent have been garnering more and more success, acclaim, and attention. Story-Wallah gathers the finest South Asian voices in fiction for the first time in a single volume. As Shyam Selvadurai writes in his introduction, "The stories jostle up against each other . . . The effect is a marvelous cacophony that reminds me of . . . one of those South Writers of South Asian descent have been garnering more and more success, acclaim, and attention. Story-Wallah gathers the finest South Asian voices in fiction for the first time in a single volume. As Shyam Selvadurai writes in his introduction, "The stories jostle up against each other . . . The effect is a marvelous cacophony that reminds me of . . . one of those South Asian bazaars, a bargaining, carnival-like milieu. The goods on sale in this instance being stories hawked by story-traders: story-wallahs." In this book, some of the world's best fiction writers hawk their wares from different parts of the South Asian diaspora -- Sri Lanka, India, the United States, Great Britain, Guyana, Malaysia, Trinidad, Fiji -- creating a virtual map of the world with their tales. These stories explore universal themes of identity, culture, and home, and Story-Wallah includes a rich array of experiences: a honeymoon in Sri Lanka, the trials of a Bangladeshi refugee in England, life on a sugar plantation in Trinidad, the attempts of an Indian family to arrange a marriage for their rebellious daughter. This anthology is essential reading for anyone with an interest in South Asian writers and the dynamic, important tales they have to tell.

30 review for Story-Wallah: Short Fiction from South Asian Writers

  1. 5 out of 5

    Hana

    In this book, some of the world's best fiction writers hawk their wares from different parts of the South Asian diaspora -- Sri Lanka, India, the United States, Great Britain, Guyana, Malaysia, Trinidad, Fiji -- creating a virtual map of the world with their tales. A must for my around-the-world reading challenge. In this book, some of the world's best fiction writers hawk their wares from different parts of the South Asian diaspora -- Sri Lanka, India, the United States, Great Britain, Guyana, Malaysia, Trinidad, Fiji -- creating a virtual map of the world with their tales. A must for my around-the-world reading challenge.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Maya

    a good jumping off point if you want to start reading south asian writing, as it contains most of the "biggest" authors from the diaspora. some of the works have been published before which annoyed me because i had read them already. especially Jhumpa Lahiri's contribution, which is a repeat from her own short story collection, Interpreter of Maladies, and not even one of the best stories from that it. Overall, I wasn't impressed with the "big names" in the book (except for Salman Rushdie and a good jumping off point if you want to start reading south asian writing, as it contains most of the "biggest" authors from the diaspora. some of the works have been published before which annoyed me because i had read them already. especially Jhumpa Lahiri's contribution, which is a repeat from her own short story collection, Interpreter of Maladies, and not even one of the best stories from that it. Overall, I wasn't impressed with the "big names" in the book (except for Salman Rushdie and Anita Desai's contribution) but the lesser known authors really came up strong, showing varied aspects of the diaspora that aren't always represented in the media.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Rakesh

    "Following the abolition of slavery, vast numbers of South Asian indentured labourers were shipped off to the sugar plantations of Trinidad, Guyana, Surinam, Mauritius, Fiji, and South Africa to replace the old slave populations. There was also a movement of labour to British East Africa and Malaya to work on the railways and in the rubber plantations, respectively." South Asians, the next best thing to slave labor. Oh, those "civilized" British. The book is subtitled A Celebration of South Asian "Following the abolition of slavery, vast numbers of South Asian indentured labourers were shipped off to the sugar plantations of Trinidad, Guyana, Surinam, Mauritius, Fiji, and South Africa to replace the old slave populations. There was also a movement of labour to British East Africa and Malaya to work on the railways and in the rubber plantations, respectively." South Asians, the next best thing to slave labor. Oh, those "civilized" British. The book is subtitled A Celebration of South Asian Fiction. That's not how I would state it. It is a book of stories by authors from around the world who are of South Asian ancestry.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Anne

    I was only able to read 2 stories from this collection, but I would gladly read everything if only I can find a copy of it.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Claire S

    This collection of short stories is massive and fascinating; succeeding in its goal (in my opinion) of presenting life at the edge of multiple cultures as lived by folks of South Asian ethnicity. First, about the name. The word 'wallah' in South Asia means some or all of the following: vendor of, craftsman of, expert in. It is a very common term there, and carries connotations of abundant supply of all that is good. In the introduction the editor, Shyam Selvadurai, describes his journey and strugg This collection of short stories is massive and fascinating; succeeding in its goal (in my opinion) of presenting life at the edge of multiple cultures as lived by folks of South Asian ethnicity. First, about the name. The word 'wallah' in South Asia means some or all of the following: vendor of, craftsman of, expert in. It is a very common term there, and carries connotations of abundant supply of all that is good. In the introduction the editor, Shyam Selvadurai, describes his journey and struggle of self-identification as he went from Sri Lanka to Canada (moved at 19). He uses the term diaspora over immigrant to include weight to each person's (sometimes secret) history, and also to include the struggles of each person in reshaping their identity in relation to both their old and new home. Those areas are some of the main essential contents of this collection. While these themes are very specific, the truth of them reaches the universal. For instance, in Anita Desai's 'Winterscape,' the space between people who are in intimate relationships is explored with ringing clarity. Anita clearly creates four characters: a man who moved to the West, the white woman he married, and the man's two mothers who remained in India. And the moment captured is his wife's defining as 'other' the man's two moms, in their reaction to snow. He feels bewildered and somewhat hurt by her reaction. In that is contained so much of the human experience: and thinking about ok/not ok; good/ bad fascinates me. Another universal (and particular) aspect of life included in this collection is religious extremism, which is cut wide open in Zulfikar Ghose's 'The Marble Dome,' which explores Pakistani society and is another of my favorites. In editing this collection, Shyam includes aspects of his own being. One of those aspects is that he is gay which - in many South Asian cultures - continues to be outside the definition of normal. I realized when I was reading some of the stories that I was reacting as myself, a straight-but-not-narrow US resident who's been aware and supporting of lgbtq culture for over 20 years; and that the cultures involved in these diasporas were very different. In those contexts, the sub-set of these stories with lgbtq content are ground-breaking, brave and probably difficult for many in the intended audience. Two in particular are especially poignant. The first, by Shyam Selvadurai himself, is called 'Pigs Can't Fly,' and tells the story of gender definitions being imposed on a person who had been happily living outside the norm to that point. His mother, answering the question of 'Why?' would say: "Because the sky is so high and pigs can't fly, that's why." Seems as valid a support for normalcy as anything I've ever come across! The second, Sandip Roy’s ‘Auld Lang Syne’ has lingered on my mind. It is about the reunion of two men who had been lovers, on the return of one from San Francisco to India. And mentions a third man, a mutual friend of these two, who has committed suicide. It shows the three choices available to people outside their culture's norms: escape away, suicide, stay and pretend and be internally dead. That later choice is in place for millions of course, in every community almost, required by a variety of conditions. Brings 'Angels in America' and 'Brokeback Mountain' to mind, which show that the pain and damage of that choice is not restricted to the individual, but is shared by their spouse and others. Other themes in this ambitious collection include cultural differences related to historical and cultural variations. He discusses in the introduction some of these primary divisions: the first wave of movement in the 1830's, when South Asians were brought in to many British colonies (in particular) to replace slaves; the second movement beginning in the mid-1950's, in which people moved to major metropolitan centers of the West. One fascinating tidbit about British motives in encouraging businesses to import South Asian populations: 'The aim was to get people in as guest workers who, even after they acquired citizenship, would continue to function as "passive citizens" as opposed to "active citizens" who participated and represented the nation-state of Britain." That is fascinating to me, but not referenced, and the stories (those few set in England) don't really get into that sort of political question at all. I'd love to learn more about that. Anyway, additional variances among the writers he describes include relationship to South Asia - some were born elsewhere and have never visited, most travel back intermittently, regularly or frequently. Some are 1st generation, others are 2nd, 3rd, even 4th generation. While this anthology is in English, the language is a huge variability, as native vernacular is used in quite a few stories (mainly those by writers of that earlier migration): and for me that was a big challenge. In a longer work incorporating native voice, one gets used to it. In this collection, each time it's a transition to master, and each vernacular is significantly different. Fascinating, but I hadn't been ready for that. I personally found it challenging as well to determine the setting of each story, the time period, and details like that. Comes with the short-story territory; and I am disadvantaged with not having the background to catch the significance of the information that is given much of the time. What it all adds up to is that this collection of short stories both demands and rewards active reading. Prior to reading each story, there is information available about the writer and their context that is of use to contextualize their work; the content then is rich and varied on all these multiple axis. And be warned: Shyam is apparently among those who believe that Indian Diaspora in inextricably linked with India’s extreme poverty: the last story in the collection - 'Chokra', by Numair Choudhury - is a short, brutal instance of that shocking misery. This would be a great book to include for any number of classes on culture, history, identity, population, work, many different topics. I personally would encourage the reader to take your time and read according to what you are seeking and/or slowly, one at a time. Rushing through would only dilute the essence and dull the fine points of this breathtaking collection.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Boom

    1. Jaspal (By Kirpal Singh) ① This story starts with Jaspal beginning to think about his youth in a toilet. Jaspal’s family are devout Sikhs, and his parents wanted him to grow up as a proud Sikh in Singapore. Since Sikh people have to wear turbans, Jaspal also wore a turban everywhere. Especially, in school, as he met other religious friends, his turban was obvious, and because of that, many students teased him. In particular, Kong, a Chinese, who is now his brother-in-law, always makes fun of h 1. Jaspal (By Kirpal Singh) ① This story starts with Jaspal beginning to think about his youth in a toilet. Jaspal’s family are devout Sikhs, and his parents wanted him to grow up as a proud Sikh in Singapore. Since Sikh people have to wear turbans, Jaspal also wore a turban everywhere. Especially, in school, as he met other religious friends, his turban was obvious, and because of that, many students teased him. In particular, Kong, a Chinese, who is now his brother-in-law, always makes fun of him, despite they gradually promote their friendly relations. As Jaspal was married with Jenny, Chinese Kong’s sister, not only Jaspal’s parents considered it as disgrace in their family, but also Jenny’s parents, who hate Sikhs, felt shameful. Therefore, as Jaspal has been experiencing distrust among different cultural and religious people, he hoped that his sons and daughters would lead their lives harmoniously with people of different races and religions. ② I think this story might be fit for a couple who are from different cultures and religions. If they read this short story, they might sympathize and relate to the experiences of main characters. ③ ★★★: I really like this story because the author tells about Jaspal’s multicultural experience in Singapore, in addition, the author provides Jaspal’s humorous daily business, it invigorates the story. Albeit it is a very short story, I think it clearly illustrates the author’s desire to become harmonious with different types of people. 2. The Celebration (By Raymond Pillai) ① Rama’s father died one year ago and Christmas is coming up this month. Now, that Rama’s father died, Rama has become the head of his family. His family works on sugar cane farms. As they had a good crop this year, Rama wanted to celebrate Christmas, even though his father died some time ago. Since his wife, brothers, and sisters followed Rama’s mother had said that they have to cherish the memory of their father, Rama now became sulky and tried to have a Christmas celebration in his own way with his son, Anand. Although Anand did not want to kill a goat for the celebration, his father, Rama, forced him to do it. Eventually, Rama’s selfish behaviors spoiled the celebration, and it brought only sadness to his family. ② I want to recommend this story to all fathers in the world because fathers are considered as the heads of families, and since fathers usually go to work, when they come back home, they behave selfishly to ease their stresses from their workday. This story would make the readers realize that other people are also tired of understanding the overstressed fathers in the world. ③ ★★: This story gave me a lesson to learn. On my birthday, I also egoistically behaved like Rama, and as I understood Rama’s mother and wife’s feelings, I felt regretful and sorry for my own behaviors towards my family. 3. The Spell and the Ever-Changing Moon (By Rukhsana Ahmad) ① One day, Nisa, a housewife, went to Talat’s house, which her neighbor, Apa Zarina has told about. Talat is a famous astrologer, who predicts people’s characters and futures. Nisa met Talat in order to know how to control her husband, Hameed; when Hameed comes home from work, he always drinks too much and rapes and blames her. The first time, when Talat gave her a way to keep her husband under control, Nisa felt ridiculous and strange because Talat gave her an instruction that she has to give a drop of her own blood to place in drink for Hameed. However, since Talat’s magic kept reminding her, she tried it at night, and it was valid, so she could feel safe away from her husband’s violence. Yet, another day, Talat revealed that she is a swindler, and Nisa was finally determined to leave her husband with her children in order to escape from her husband’s force. ② I would like to recommend this story to married couples. As they read this story, they may think that they need to be closer to each other in order to prevent this type of failure from happening within the family. ③ ★: Since this story was about failure of one’s family, it made me feel sad and miserable. Also, because the author includes an odd Talat’s magic, which many people would think is impossible, the story may become boring for them.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Nuha

    This collection is like getting a box of Indian sweets. Some are brightly decorated but taste awful while others, the unadorned and overlooked, linger in the mouth long after. What is particularly admirable is that the collection attempts to address not only the South Asian diaspora post 1965 immigration reform, but also the diaspora born of indentured laborers in the Caribbean and beyond, addressing complicated questions of cultural authenticity and hegemony in the creation of a diasporic desi This collection is like getting a box of Indian sweets. Some are brightly decorated but taste awful while others, the unadorned and overlooked, linger in the mouth long after. What is particularly admirable is that the collection attempts to address not only the South Asian diaspora post 1965 immigration reform, but also the diaspora born of indentured laborers in the Caribbean and beyond, addressing complicated questions of cultural authenticity and hegemony in the creation of a diasporic desi identity.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Baljit

    I'm not a big fan of short stories but this collection was a great. Each story made me pause and think, like savoring a sweet sour mango. I was struck by the ordinariness of some of the tales, tinged with hopes and aspirations of emigrants, laced with nostalgia for the homeland. Still other stories convey the emotions of people trapped between two homes, struggling to find comfort in either. I'm not a big fan of short stories but this collection was a great. Each story made me pause and think, like savoring a sweet sour mango. I was struck by the ordinariness of some of the tales, tinged with hopes and aspirations of emigrants, laced with nostalgia for the homeland. Still other stories convey the emotions of people trapped between two homes, struggling to find comfort in either.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Rita

    This is an important work: South Asian authors writing from all parts of the diaspora. Much of the work is from authors LGBTQ, and much of the work dealing with LGBTQ themes. The works from the oldest writers come first, and the collection ends with a writer born in the 70s, who, sadly, died last year, after writing a novel that took him 16 years: Numair A. Choudhury. Refreshing. 3 stars The perfection of giving by Chiyra Fernando Did you ever notice how the people who talk most about being religio This is an important work: South Asian authors writing from all parts of the diaspora. Much of the work is from authors LGBTQ, and much of the work dealing with LGBTQ themes. The works from the oldest writers come first, and the collection ends with a writer born in the 70s, who, sadly, died last year, after writing a novel that took him 16 years: Numair A. Choudhury. Refreshing. 3 stars The perfection of giving by Chiyra Fernando Did you ever notice how the people who talk most about being religious, are some of the most hypocritical and ungenerous people? This is a story about this kind of person and the karma that they so deserve coming their way. 3 stars The management of grief by Bharati Mukherjee This is a story about the survivors of families who were killed in air India flight 182, in 1995 I believe. 3 stars Crossmatch by Farida Karodia Hindu Indian parents can be very old-fashioned when it comes to their children's marriage matches. And this story two sets of parents, trying to match up their children, are in for a rude awakening. 4 stars The collectors by Rohinton Mistry The disappointment a father suffers when his bully-boy son does not share interest in his stamp hobby leads to the father cultivating a friendship with the next-door neighbor boy. (I made the mistake of reading this story while I was eating a salad with blue-cheese dressing on it.) 3 stars We're not Jews by Hanif Kureishi A sad story about a little boy who lives with his mixed-race family in England and gets bullied every day at school, without even understanding why. 3 stars Captives by Romesh Gunesekera Sigiyira is a black rock on a mountain in Sri Lanka. An English couple stops at a newly-opened hotel on their"honeymoon." The manager accompanies them up the mountain and tells them the story of Kassyapa, the illegitimate son of the king, who built a palace on top of the mountain. 4 stars Out on" Main St by Shani Mootoo Trinidad's population is a mish-mash of different populations, cultures. Many born there have no idea what other's expectations mean, when they think they know who they are by looking at their face. This author's work is hilarious: "De atmosphere in de room take a hairpin turn, and it was Man aggressing on woman, woman warding off a herd a man who just had dey pride publicly cut up a couple of times in just a few minutes. One brother walk over to Janet and me and he stand up facing me with his hands clasp in front a his crotch, like if he protecting it. Stiff stiff, looking at me, he say, 'will that be all?' Mih crew cut start to tingle, so I put on Mih femmest smile and say, 'yes that's it, thank you. Just the bill please.' de smartass turn to face Janet and he remove his hands from in front a his crotch and slip his thumbs inside his pants like a cowboy 'bout to do a square dance. He smile, looking down at her attentive fuh so, and he say, 'can I do anything for you?' I didn't give Janet time for his intent to even register before I bulldoze in mih most un femmest Manner, 'she have everything she need, man, thank you. The bill please.' Yuh think he hear me? It was like I was talking to thin air. He remain smiling at Janet, but she, looking at me, not at him, say, 'you heard her. The bill please.' Before he could even leave the table proper, I start mih tirade. 'but hey hey! You see that? You could believe that! The effing so-and-so! One minute you feel sorry for them and next minute they harassing the heck out of you. Janet, he crazy to mess with my woman, yes! ' Janet get vex with me and say I overreacting and it's not for me to be Vex, but fuh she to be Vex. Is she he insult, and she could take good enough care a she self." Just when I stand up to leave, de doors dem open up and in walks SAndy and Lise, coming for dey weekly hit a Indian sweet. Well, with Sandy and lise is a dead giveaway dat dey not dressing for any man, it have no place in dey life fuh man-vibes, and dat in fact they have a blatant penchant fuh women. Soon as dey enter de room yuh could see de brothers and de couple men customers dat had come in minutes before stare dem down from head to Birkenstocks, dey eyes bulging with disgust. And de women in de room start shoo-shooing, and putting dey hand in front dey mouth to stop dey surprise, and false teeth, too, from falling out. Sandy and lise spot us instantly and dey call out to us Shameless, loud and affectionate. Dey leap over to us, eager to hug up and kiss like if dey hadn't seen us for years, but it was really only since two nights aback when we went out to dey favorite Indian restaurant for dinner. I figure dat de display was a genuine happiness to be seen wit us in dat place. While we stand up dere chatting, Sandy insist on rubbing she hand up and down Janet back--wit friendly intent, mind you, and same time Lise have she arm round Sandy waist. Well, all cover get blown. If it was even remotely possible dat I wasn't noticeable before, now Janet and I were over exposed. We could a easily suffer from hypothermia, specially since it suddenly get cold cold in there." 4 stars Chakra by Numair A Chadhury This story is troubling, touching, and puzzling.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Mallika

    Perhaps the most thought-provoking and subversive anthology/ combination of short stories that I have ever read! I'm about to read it again... Perhaps the most thought-provoking and subversive anthology/ combination of short stories that I have ever read! I'm about to read it again...

  11. 4 out of 5

    Lubna

    A collection of short stories from writers in the South Asian diaspora. The breadth of writers and their subject matters are impressive- from Indo-Caribbeans to South Asians in Singapore & Malayasia who migrated generations ago to the newer diaspora in Europe & North America. The stories themselves are a mixed bag - some are brilliant and others were terrible. In particular, I found stories where everything was written in Caribbean patois to be difficult to read and also completely unnecessary f A collection of short stories from writers in the South Asian diaspora. The breadth of writers and their subject matters are impressive- from Indo-Caribbeans to South Asians in Singapore & Malayasia who migrated generations ago to the newer diaspora in Europe & North America. The stories themselves are a mixed bag - some are brilliant and others were terrible. In particular, I found stories where everything was written in Caribbean patois to be difficult to read and also completely unnecessary for the characters and story.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Alice

    Hip 1.1 - Great Selection of South Asian Short Stories... Highly recommend

  13. 4 out of 5

    Suzanne Ray

    I learned some things about the views of these cultures, but none of the stories stayed with me.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. This collection of short stories had a very diverse selection of writers with South Asian origin and background. The stories I read gave excellent examples of multiculturalism and the insight about the universal theme of one’s identity. The introduction of this book describes this multicultural background and the spread of cultural identity as diaspora. The word diaspora comes from Greek origin meaning the “scattering of seeds.” Webster’s definition of it is “the dispersion of any people from th This collection of short stories had a very diverse selection of writers with South Asian origin and background. The stories I read gave excellent examples of multiculturalism and the insight about the universal theme of one’s identity. The introduction of this book describes this multicultural background and the spread of cultural identity as diaspora. The word diaspora comes from Greek origin meaning the “scattering of seeds.” Webster’s definition of it is “the dispersion of any people from their original homeland.” That’s exactly what we can see in these stories. We see change in the characters by the dynamic cultural mixing through their experiences. A story that I believe conveys this change well is Mukherjee’s “The Management of Grief.” It’s a story about a Hindu woman named Shaila Bhave who has lost her husband and son in a plane crash loosely based around the Air India Flight 182 incident. After this event the Canadian government gave their sympathy to India instead of Canada. Even though most of the victims were Canadians who had Indian decent. This incident allowed Shaila to travels around North America and Ireland, changing her identity through diaspora. She witnessed the struggles of more than just her Indian relatives, but parts of the world she never knew before. She saw how some cultures thrived for uniformity in there people. While others encouraged tolerance and equality but held discrimination across all races. She saw compassion between religions as well as disputes. All of those experiences help shaped who she is. As Selvadurai said, “a collective identity can be very effective as a tool of resistance and empowerment and freedom.” The past and clashes of cultures is what creates on cultural identity, their self-being. The idea and theory of diaspora has to be fluid and incorporate differences in order to thrive. It has to be elastic and diverse, yet stable. Whether it be ones race, ethnic origin, sexuality, gender, or class, all of it is needed. Altogether, these differences, is what defines who we are, our process of becoming. When in the process of diaspora people grow and change, as does the environment around them. Peoples’ differences continually change the culture, society, and political understanding. It help create awareness of the world we live in as well as ourselves. The stories in this collection portrays all of this some manner or another. I personally enjoyed the stories, because I have a dual-cultural background and find some of the stories concepts relatable. I’m sure those without a multicultural background can relate to this as well though. Everyone eventually has to find their self-being. In that process we all take apart in diaspora and leave our mark. This book and the stories in it are that example of leaving behind a mark. I highly recommended the collection solely for that fact.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Mehrnaz

    Nicely written. It is fiction about the experiences of South asian people immigrating to USA or Canada and their different problems with assimilation,racism, sexuality and so on. Some of the writers are well-known and therefore their writing is appealing and literary; but some has used the words that are not common in current English literature and I think it is because English has been the second language for them. Several stories are about dilemmas that they have had with the concept of homosexu Nicely written. It is fiction about the experiences of South asian people immigrating to USA or Canada and their different problems with assimilation,racism, sexuality and so on. Some of the writers are well-known and therefore their writing is appealing and literary; but some has used the words that are not common in current English literature and I think it is because English has been the second language for them. Several stories are about dilemmas that they have had with the concept of homosexuality and I think it has been a big concern of the author himself too. Overall, I pretty much liked this book. It familiarized me more with the group of people of which I am a part: "Immigrants". I could easily sympathize with them.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Zinnia Gupte

    From Amazon: "One minute you're in Trinidad on a sugar plantation, the next in a wealthy home in South Africa. Some are side-splittingly funny, others sad, others very poignant." "...the best fiction writers hawk their wares from different parts of the South Asian diaspora -- Sri Lanka, India, the United States, Great Britain, Guyana, Malaysia, Trinidad, Fiji -- creating a virtual map of the world with their tales. These stories explore universal themes of identity, culture, and home, and Story-Wa From Amazon: "One minute you're in Trinidad on a sugar plantation, the next in a wealthy home in South Africa. Some are side-splittingly funny, others sad, others very poignant." "...the best fiction writers hawk their wares from different parts of the South Asian diaspora -- Sri Lanka, India, the United States, Great Britain, Guyana, Malaysia, Trinidad, Fiji -- creating a virtual map of the world with their tales. These stories explore universal themes of identity, culture, and home, and Story-Wallah includes a rich array of experiences: a honeymoon in Sri Lanka, the trials of a Bangladeshi refugee in England, life on a sugar plantation in Trinidad, the attempts of an Indian family to arrange a marriage for their rebellious daughter."

  17. 4 out of 5

    Rollin

    Liked it a lot. Great collection of short stories by "South Asian" authors, which seems to mostly from India, and common denominator all written about life and culture transplanted away from the home country, the "diaspora". I love short stories, and am unfamiliar with south asian culture, so this was great fun. Even better, the book was left here on the bookshelf in the apartment we are subletting. I need to thank our hosts. Liked it a lot. Great collection of short stories by "South Asian" authors, which seems to mostly from India, and common denominator all written about life and culture transplanted away from the home country, the "diaspora". I love short stories, and am unfamiliar with south asian culture, so this was great fun. Even better, the book was left here on the bookshelf in the apartment we are subletting. I need to thank our hosts.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Anne

    Really liked this collection of stories. All are evocative and poignant. Gritty characterisation in all of them. Did have problems coping with the creation of accent in the story set in Trinidad. Salman Rushdie's story was excellent. Good to read if you arent familiar with any of these authors. Worth pursuing books by people such as Jhumpa Lahiri. Really liked this collection of stories. All are evocative and poignant. Gritty characterisation in all of them. Did have problems coping with the creation of accent in the story set in Trinidad. Salman Rushdie's story was excellent. Good to read if you arent familiar with any of these authors. Worth pursuing books by people such as Jhumpa Lahiri.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Tasneem

    An interesting collection of short stories that made me think of what it means to be a post-colonial individual. I am English but I was born in Sri Lanka and the dichotomy of that kind of existence comes through in this.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Deepika

    There are a handful of good stories and some okay ones, but overall it was the most diverse collection of south asian writing, with stories about south asians in trinidad and the carribean. The exposure to other voices was a value in of itself.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Ming

    A great anthology with a terrific variety of South Asian writers, many of whom I wouldn't have experienced. Now I've got more reading pleasure ahead of me. A great anthology with a terrific variety of South Asian writers, many of whom I wouldn't have experienced. Now I've got more reading pleasure ahead of me.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Sandi

    Great Selection of South Asian Short Stories... Highly recommended

  23. 4 out of 5

    Uzma

    a compilation of many stories from southeast asian writers. was a bit disappointed because all the stories are not originals. but still worth reading.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Marie G

    Best short stories....all different matters. Heart strings pullers. Very diverse, great way to discover new authors. I loved it!

  25. 5 out of 5

    Kathleen McRae

    Excellent collection of short stories by South Asian writers. I really enjoyed reading this collection of stories.Some were funny and most were very well written

  26. 4 out of 5

    Shane

    Great intro to the genesis and state-of-the-nation of South Asian literature

  27. 4 out of 5

    Nirmal

    Very few of the short stories were able to grab my attention

  28. 5 out of 5

    Kookie

  29. 4 out of 5

    Shantal

  30. 5 out of 5

    Joey

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