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Shatter: The Revolutionary Graphic Novel

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"In the day before tomorrow, all jobs are temporary, and control is in the hands of a few ruthless men. The world's biggest, most influential media syndicate has accidentally discovered a limitless source of cheap creative talent: stealing people's brains out of their heads. Only one man can stop them: a temporary cop with a golden brain. A man on a mission whose mind is c "In the day before tomorrow, all jobs are temporary, and control is in the hands of a few ruthless men. The world's biggest, most influential media syndicate has accidentally discovered a limitless source of cheap creative talent: stealing people's brains out of their heads. Only one man can stop them: a temporary cop with a golden brain. A man on a mission whose mind is capable of absorbing the talents of others... permanently. A man named Sadr al-din Morales. His friends call him... SHATTER." Shatter was the first commercially published all-digital comic, i.e. a comic for which the art was created entirely on the computer; as opposed to what later became the common method of drawing on board with pencil, pen, and ink and then scanning the black-and-white art into a computer for the application of color. The Shatter artwork was initially drawn on a first-generation Apple Macintosh using a mouse, and printed out on an Apple dot-matrix ImageWriter. The print-outs were then photographed like a piece of traditionally drawn black-and-white comic art, and the color separations were applied in the traditional manner for comics at the time. (This is almost the reverse of the current method of drawing comics on board and scanning the art into a computer for the application of color in computer graphics programs.)


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"In the day before tomorrow, all jobs are temporary, and control is in the hands of a few ruthless men. The world's biggest, most influential media syndicate has accidentally discovered a limitless source of cheap creative talent: stealing people's brains out of their heads. Only one man can stop them: a temporary cop with a golden brain. A man on a mission whose mind is c "In the day before tomorrow, all jobs are temporary, and control is in the hands of a few ruthless men. The world's biggest, most influential media syndicate has accidentally discovered a limitless source of cheap creative talent: stealing people's brains out of their heads. Only one man can stop them: a temporary cop with a golden brain. A man on a mission whose mind is capable of absorbing the talents of others... permanently. A man named Sadr al-din Morales. His friends call him... SHATTER." Shatter was the first commercially published all-digital comic, i.e. a comic for which the art was created entirely on the computer; as opposed to what later became the common method of drawing on board with pencil, pen, and ink and then scanning the black-and-white art into a computer for the application of color. The Shatter artwork was initially drawn on a first-generation Apple Macintosh using a mouse, and printed out on an Apple dot-matrix ImageWriter. The print-outs were then photographed like a piece of traditionally drawn black-and-white comic art, and the color separations were applied in the traditional manner for comics at the time. (This is almost the reverse of the current method of drawing comics on board and scanning the art into a computer for the application of color in computer graphics programs.)

38 review for Shatter: The Revolutionary Graphic Novel

  1. 4 out of 5

    StrictlySequential

    THE RATING IS ONLY FOR THE 9 MICHAEL SAENZ CHAPTERS- THE LAST 2 (completely lacking him) ARE GARBAGE!! *YES- They're THAT bad. The art carries over since the characters were already made but the story is a dripping poopsicle* Saenz and Gillis were the creators but Gillis dropped out after the first 2 so the idea and story aren't all Saenz but he continued to make great story AND art on his own until the Brit(s) bungled the ending. This near future is one of the most likely, when putting yourself in THE RATING IS ONLY FOR THE 9 MICHAEL SAENZ CHAPTERS- THE LAST 2 (completely lacking him) ARE GARBAGE!! *YES- They're THAT bad. The art carries over since the characters were already made but the story is a dripping poopsicle* Saenz and Gillis were the creators but Gillis dropped out after the first 2 so the idea and story aren't all Saenz but he continued to make great story AND art on his own until the Brit(s) bungled the ending. This near future is one of the most likely, when putting yourself in the spirit of the 1980s, that I've read- many societal changes could even still happen. You won't be burdened with clumsy science fiction hurdles- their idea concerning RNA isn't too far fetched and I found it fascinating! The characters are all well crafted and bend ethics just the same as we do now in a fast-paced action blockbuster that I had a great time reading! THE ART: My initial interest in this was purely to experience a landmark work of art- experimenting with cutting edge computer art and pioneering it as a sequential art medium. It was a huge gamble because at that time computers were seen as a threat to all the established methods so they really had to whip out their marble-bags and plop them down on the table for all to observe '{oo}' This treatment looks blotchy and obtuse most of the time but there are some really excellent panels throughout. The most important part is how it tells the story and it succeeds to my high standards. I am NOT a 2-D computer art guy but I give credit where it is due. That does not mean that it interests me beyond this book and Pepe Moreno's "Batman: Digital Justice" (I read all Gotham Elseworlds") which did well to prove that computer rendering wasn't taking anything over for awhile. As of 2019 we see that the careers of all those established artists weren't jeopardized and that all who would enter the trade afterwards could grow up with the option if they chose. I try to avoid those who now render with electro-hands but I end up not knowing until I open it upon arrival. I like this kind of "crude" computer art much more than the sneaky crap you see today.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Nick Cox

    The more widely you read (or watch movies and TV) the less William Gibson's Neuromancer seems to be the first cyberpunk work of fiction. That said, neither Neuromancer nor Shatter come close to the level of quality of works like Blade Runner, despite any innovations they may have in theme or topic. Shatter prides itself on being the first comic whose work was entirely rendered on computer, specifically a first generation Apple Mac. If you've ever been struck by how dated movie and TV effects can The more widely you read (or watch movies and TV) the less William Gibson's Neuromancer seems to be the first cyberpunk work of fiction. That said, neither Neuromancer nor Shatter come close to the level of quality of works like Blade Runner, despite any innovations they may have in theme or topic. Shatter prides itself on being the first comic whose work was entirely rendered on computer, specifically a first generation Apple Mac. If you've ever been struck by how dated movie and TV effects can look after only a few years, then you can imagine how poor this comic looks today. Certain individual panels have a stylistic resemblance to Warhol prints, but aren't sufficiently good in themselves to either be striking as art or as parts of a greater comic whole. As a dystopian sci-fi story, Shatter also fares poorly. Twists and betrayals mean that nobody (underclass, artists, working joes or capitalists) remains sympathetic to the end and even our 'designated hero' is motivated by nothing more than self-preservation right to the end. Admittedly, the writing can be rather clumsy and self-righteous when such heroes convert to the cause of the 'greater good' in other works and the lack of this kind of character arc is more in keeping with the noir tradition that cyberpunk often follows; nonetheless, it can be hugely annoying to finish reading such a work to find that the dystopia remains a dystopia, the hero remains one job away from the breadline and just about everyone else turns out to be a self-centred villain.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Nicholas Diak

  4. 5 out of 5

    Neven

  5. 5 out of 5

    Terry Mulcahy

  6. 4 out of 5

    Michael

  7. 4 out of 5

    Tim Heard

  8. 4 out of 5

    Joshua Williams

  9. 5 out of 5

    stephen

  10. 5 out of 5

    Mike

  11. 4 out of 5

    David

  12. 4 out of 5

    Patrick Cooley

  13. 4 out of 5

    Zachary

  14. 5 out of 5

    John

  15. 4 out of 5

    Brent

  16. 5 out of 5

    Laurance

  17. 4 out of 5

    David

  18. 5 out of 5

    Ronin

  19. 4 out of 5

    Sheila

  20. 4 out of 5

    Matt

  21. 4 out of 5

    Janssen Cunanan

  22. 5 out of 5

    Coeli

  23. 5 out of 5

    Mark

  24. 4 out of 5

    Peter Birdsall

  25. 5 out of 5

    Bill Cunningham

  26. 4 out of 5

    Dmitriy

  27. 4 out of 5

    Jim

  28. 4 out of 5

    Kittyzz

  29. 4 out of 5

    Jeff Price

  30. 4 out of 5

    Leif

  31. 5 out of 5

    Celebi

  32. 4 out of 5

    Larry Osterman

  33. 4 out of 5

    Broter Heinlein

  34. 4 out of 5

    Andy Burkholder

  35. 4 out of 5

    Stephen

  36. 4 out of 5

    Francesca Viliani

  37. 5 out of 5

    Mike Moore

  38. 4 out of 5

    .sjb.

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