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The Best Short Stories of Edgar Allan Poe

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This volume contains a collection of some of the best short stories ever written by Edgar Allan Poe. A master of the macabre, Poe exhibits his literary prowess in these classic short stories. Contained within this volume are the following: The Gold-Bug, The Murders in the Rue Morgue, The Balloon-Hoax, The Purloined Letter, A Descent into the Maelstrom, The Black Cat, The F This volume contains a collection of some of the best short stories ever written by Edgar Allan Poe. A master of the macabre, Poe exhibits his literary prowess in these classic short stories. Contained within this volume are the following: The Gold-Bug, The Murders in the Rue Morgue, The Balloon-Hoax, The Purloined Letter, A Descent into the Maelstrom, The Black Cat, The Fall of the House of Usher, The Masque of the Red Death, The Cask of Amontillado, The Pit and the Pendulum, and The Tell-Tale Heart."


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This volume contains a collection of some of the best short stories ever written by Edgar Allan Poe. A master of the macabre, Poe exhibits his literary prowess in these classic short stories. Contained within this volume are the following: The Gold-Bug, The Murders in the Rue Morgue, The Balloon-Hoax, The Purloined Letter, A Descent into the Maelstrom, The Black Cat, The F This volume contains a collection of some of the best short stories ever written by Edgar Allan Poe. A master of the macabre, Poe exhibits his literary prowess in these classic short stories. Contained within this volume are the following: The Gold-Bug, The Murders in the Rue Morgue, The Balloon-Hoax, The Purloined Letter, A Descent into the Maelstrom, The Black Cat, The Fall of the House of Usher, The Masque of the Red Death, The Cask of Amontillado, The Pit and the Pendulum, and The Tell-Tale Heart."

30 review for The Best Short Stories of Edgar Allan Poe

  1. 5 out of 5

    Haley

    Edgar Allan Poe is definitely depressing. I was really interested in the quotes starting each story. Fortunately, I was able to translate some of it; however, it was pretty confusing, so I had to research the rest. In the end, I found that the quote before The Pit and the Pendulum says, “Here an unholy mob of torturers, with an unquenchable thirst for human blood, once fed their long frenzy. Our homeland is safe now, the baneful pit destroyed, and what was once a place of savage death is now a s Edgar Allan Poe is definitely depressing. I was really interested in the quotes starting each story. Fortunately, I was able to translate some of it; however, it was pretty confusing, so I had to research the rest. In the end, I found that the quote before The Pit and the Pendulum says, “Here an unholy mob of torturers, with an unquenchable thirst for human blood, once fed their long frenzy. Our homeland is safe now, the baneful pit destroyed, and what was once a place of savage death is now a scene of life and health.” What a happy start to the story! Poe does give a lot of detail. What’s interesting, though, is that in almost all if not all his stories, Edgar Allan Poe seems to start right in the action. He doesn’t explain what in the world is going on until later, which is when the details come in. In the beginning of Edgar Allan Poe’s The Fall of the House of Usher, there was that sinister feeling, knowing absolutely nothing about the characters, Roderick Usher and narrator, other than the fact that they were close friends as young boys. He left a really eerie feeling with his vagueness. I kept wondering, who was this Roderick Usher? The narrator obviously knew him, yet somehow happened to know basically nothing about him. Something else I thought was interesting was that Edgar Allan Poe took quite a while at the start of his story merely to explain the creepy aura of the old house. Poe’s writing was definitely freaky. For some reason, I always read books like they’re a movie, sometimes with some sort of dramatic music in the background. Yet, this time, I pictured it with utter silence, which is often way more terrifying. For a moment, I was there, walking towards this house, known for it’s terrifying history. With a rustling of the leaves and the wind pushing me forward, I felt like I was at the house of Usher. However, although Poe is vague and eerie as many people say, his writing style is very intriguing to me. He tells me just enough to leave on the edge of my seat, wondering what’s next. So, although he is slightly creepy, as he is well known for, I did enjoy his writing.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Zoe

    You know a book's bad when you can't even bring yourself to speed read it You know a book's bad when you can't even bring yourself to speed read it

  3. 4 out of 5

    Macy

    The Tell Tale Heart is a story from this collection that would work well in an 8th grade classroom. It involves a speaker justifying his recent murder of a man with an unusual eye. It could work in tandem with The Landlady in an investigation of the horror literary genre. Instead of using The Tell Tale Heart as a model text for student work, students could do a Text Reformulation of the story. Most effectively, students could do an illustration or a graphic novel type reformulation to imagine ho The Tell Tale Heart is a story from this collection that would work well in an 8th grade classroom. It involves a speaker justifying his recent murder of a man with an unusual eye. It could work in tandem with The Landlady in an investigation of the horror literary genre. Instead of using The Tell Tale Heart as a model text for student work, students could do a Text Reformulation of the story. Most effectively, students could do an illustration or a graphic novel type reformulation to imagine how different elements of the story might look in real life. The illustration aspect would highlight the imagery in the story and help readers to discern what is real for the narrator and what is imagined. In a classroom focusing on the concept of interdependence, this can help students investigate how the narrator depends on both what is real in his world and what is imagined, and how those distinctions are debatable based on the readers' interpretation of the text. If each student is tasked to make a representation of the story individually before discussing the content with peers and the full class, their own interpretation will shine through. This will uncover the interdependence not only between what is real and imagined in the world of The Tell Tale Heart, but also how a reader and a text depend on one another to communicate a main idea, message, and content. This activity would be multi-faceted and stretch students' imaginations while also helping them to understand the reliance within and between text and reader.

  4. 5 out of 5

    LauraJade

    The Masque of the Red Death - read 3rd Oct 2020 The Gold-Bug - read 17th-18th April 2012 This is such an effortless, fluent, fantastically formed short story. A curious story about a hunt for treasure, and a code-breaking pirate map. Great detail has gone into the execution of the tale, and I have just read that it was the apparent inspiration of R. L. Stevenson's 'Treasure Island' which I had no idea about, but is easy to see why! The Murders In The Rue Morgue read 7th May 2012 'The first detective The Masque of the Red Death - read 3rd Oct 2020 The Gold-Bug - read 17th-18th April 2012 This is such an effortless, fluent, fantastically formed short story. A curious story about a hunt for treasure, and a code-breaking pirate map. Great detail has gone into the execution of the tale, and I have just read that it was the apparent inspiration of R. L. Stevenson's 'Treasure Island' which I had no idea about, but is easy to see why! The Murders In The Rue Morgue read 7th May 2012 'The first detective story' Truly fascinating, this short story is clearly the inspiration for Conan Doyle's Study In Scarlet - "As the first true detective in fiction, the Dupin character established many literary devices which would be used in future fictional detectives including Sherlock Holmes and Hercule Poirot. Many later characters, for example, follow Poe's model of the brilliant detective, his personal friend who serves as narrator, and the final revelation being presented before the reasoning that leads up to it." (wikipedia) - In fact Dr Watson even compares Sherlock to Dupin in 'Scarlet', ("You remind me of Edgar Allen Poe's Dupin. I had no idea that such individuals did exist outside of stories...") to which, as you would expect, Holmes replies with chagrin that Dupin was inferior, showy and superficial... But really 'Rue Morgue' is very similar to 'Scarlet', the eccentric detective, the baffled inspector, and the companion as narrator, in awe of it all. Loved this (but glad that Conan Doyle didn't resort to a Orang-Utan...!)

  5. 5 out of 5

    Amanda Jane

    I read all the stories in one night...What fun Mr.Poe and I have! It is 2:45 am and time for me to turn out the light...I guess I will find out just how much fun it truly was or how frightening. I have a feeling it will be the latter! As long as I don't think about the cat I should survive the night.....fingers crossed! I read all the stories in one night...What fun Mr.Poe and I have! It is 2:45 am and time for me to turn out the light...I guess I will find out just how much fun it truly was or how frightening. I have a feeling it will be the latter! As long as I don't think about the cat I should survive the night.....fingers crossed!

  6. 4 out of 5

    Nalini

    A short and satisfying read. With Poe's obsession with the subject of death, this never seemed dull. There is more than one premature burial. The characters are, let's just say, 'unusual'. Unlike some of the most memorable characters who are dead, this book has a pulse. A short and satisfying read. With Poe's obsession with the subject of death, this never seemed dull. There is more than one premature burial. The characters are, let's just say, 'unusual'. Unlike some of the most memorable characters who are dead, this book has a pulse.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Arcadia

    ummmmmmm, i guess i just got into the emo mood with the two last stories. the narrative lost me sometimes. i really really liked 'the tell-tale heart'. review to be revised upon studying in class :) ummmmmmm, i guess i just got into the emo mood with the two last stories. the narrative lost me sometimes. i really really liked 'the tell-tale heart'. review to be revised upon studying in class :)

  8. 5 out of 5

    Douglas Fugate

    We all have our favorites.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Avishek Das

    As usual it was short but not w=sweet...there is an amazing balance of pain & pleasure!

  10. 4 out of 5

    Damaris Vargas

    I could say Poe was one of the first ones in the terror genre. He really knows how to keep everything so creepy and in suspense.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Jada 📚☕️

    Listened to some of these on podcast and followed along in the book (pit and the pendulum, the cast of red death, fall of the house of usher) the podcast added to the experience (still had to pause and reread a few sentences) and I also found a little animation on YT for the Pit and the Pendulum which was even better bc it gave a visual. What I like about his stories are the psychological conundrums, or Mind fucks to put it plainly lol. Yes u have the physical terror but u also have the play on Listened to some of these on podcast and followed along in the book (pit and the pendulum, the cast of red death, fall of the house of usher) the podcast added to the experience (still had to pause and reread a few sentences) and I also found a little animation on YT for the Pit and the Pendulum which was even better bc it gave a visual. What I like about his stories are the psychological conundrums, or Mind fucks to put it plainly lol. Yes u have the physical terror but u also have the play on the Mind and how Poe can actually describe this stuff and make u feel the mental strain too is genius which can only be a gift from God in my opinion. Poes influence can easily be found in horror and psychological thrillers.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer

    Good: some of the stories were quite engaging and mysterious/spooky, and I quite enjoyed the structure in many of them which was ‘hmmm here is a mystery? Let me solve the mystery like a detective!’ Others...not so much Bad: sometimes I forget that old books will have olde time language which I struggle to understand, many of these took a long time to get into despite being short stories, and, evidently, I don’t care for short story collections because I struggle to get into the stories and the de Good: some of the stories were quite engaging and mysterious/spooky, and I quite enjoyed the structure in many of them which was ‘hmmm here is a mystery? Let me solve the mystery like a detective!’ Others...not so much Bad: sometimes I forget that old books will have olde time language which I struggle to understand, many of these took a long time to get into despite being short stories, and, evidently, I don’t care for short story collections because I struggle to get into the stories and the desire to pick the book up is non-existent. So.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Maartje Volder

    some of these stories are so lovable. I like the ones with riddles in it, they require a sherlock type of mind. And like almost anybody the Telltale Heart is splendid. However, some of the stories were so though to get through. the only reason I could was because I knew they would be short. so averaging out the ratings of all stories it is a 3 out of 5

  14. 5 out of 5

    Bethan

    This took me ages to read, the language is just so different from now, it's hard to get into. I have to say a lot of the stories seemed pointless to me, without any central meaning. But I did enjoy 'the black cat' that was by far my favourite. My least favourite was most definitely 'the gold-bug' which began my long struggle to finish this collection. This took me ages to read, the language is just so different from now, it's hard to get into. I have to say a lot of the stories seemed pointless to me, without any central meaning. But I did enjoy 'the black cat' that was by far my favourite. My least favourite was most definitely 'the gold-bug' which began my long struggle to finish this collection.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Gilea🍸Marie

    A man of intense emotion, the innermost recesses of Edgar Allan Poe's soul are clearly visible through the varied emotional states of these characters. They explore all facets of humanity, ranging from the intellectual, the spiritual, and the physical. Some stories have a greater personal significance than others, which were written for commercial purposes. A man of intense emotion, the innermost recesses of Edgar Allan Poe's soul are clearly visible through the varied emotional states of these characters. They explore all facets of humanity, ranging from the intellectual, the spiritual, and the physical. Some stories have a greater personal significance than others, which were written for commercial purposes.

  16. 4 out of 5

    ro

    i read half of them for my english class so it took me a while to finish the rest of the stories. tbh i skimmed the rest mostly and they appealed to me less because i truly start to appreciate his work once i analyze it and i didnt really wanna do that lol.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Ellie McCabe

    As I listened to this in the early hours before day break I sat in front of a large window. And suddenly a crow with a mouse in its talons flew past! Which was a lot of fun. Three stars as I found some of the stories a bit boring. Other were quiet the spooky atmosphere I was looking for.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Georgie Laird

    I just love all of his works.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Karen

    Poe wrote with such clarity yet he erased so many dividing lines.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Marky Blue

    He was a genius!

  21. 4 out of 5

    Chloe Crammond

    DNF - disappointing

  22. 5 out of 5

    Kevin

    I taught these to juniors in American Literature, and many of the themes and motifs repeat in these Gothic tales, but Poe's style is often engaging and enchanting! I taught these to juniors in American Literature, and many of the themes and motifs repeat in these Gothic tales, but Poe's style is often engaging and enchanting!

  23. 5 out of 5

    Gabriela Mrs

    I loved every bit of it.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Ranette

    If you like a good scare, these stories are for you.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Ode Au

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. well i only read murders in the rue mourge and you telling me the orangutan killed both them gurls no♥️

  26. 4 out of 5

    Tori Samar

    An aptly-named anthology. It contains all the Poe short stories I would expect to be included in any anthology claiming to have the best ones, plus several more completely unfamiliar to me. Edgar Allan Poe is worth reading because of his place in the history of American literature. He mastered the short story form, wielded the literary elements with skill, created atmosphere like nobody else, and demonstrated great artistry in his prose (it's no wonder he was also an excellent poet!). The only r An aptly-named anthology. It contains all the Poe short stories I would expect to be included in any anthology claiming to have the best ones, plus several more completely unfamiliar to me. Edgar Allan Poe is worth reading because of his place in the history of American literature. He mastered the short story form, wielded the literary elements with skill, created atmosphere like nobody else, and demonstrated great artistry in his prose (it's no wonder he was also an excellent poet!). The only reason his collected short stories don't achieve the 5-star level for me is that after awhile, the darkness of his storytelling becomes less and less palatable. Best to swallow Poe in very small doses, in my opinion. (The Literary Life Podcast's 20 for 2020 Reading Challenge - A collection of short stories)

  27. 5 out of 5

    Karen T

    High quality collection of Edgar Allan Poe’s stories and well illustrated.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Laurent

    "The Best Short Stories of Edgar Allan Poe" is a fairly self-explanatorially titled compendium of the celebrated author's greatest works. Ranging from treasure hunts for buried pirate gold, to the brilliant, crime-resolving assertions of a Holmes-like Frenchman, to Poe's universally known tales of the macabre, this collection of short stories is horrifyingly riveting and alarmingly thought-provoking. Though I cannot, in earnest, begin to explain Poe's striking brilliance, his cleverly-devised pr "The Best Short Stories of Edgar Allan Poe" is a fairly self-explanatorially titled compendium of the celebrated author's greatest works. Ranging from treasure hunts for buried pirate gold, to the brilliant, crime-resolving assertions of a Holmes-like Frenchman, to Poe's universally known tales of the macabre, this collection of short stories is horrifyingly riveting and alarmingly thought-provoking. Though I cannot, in earnest, begin to explain Poe's striking brilliance, his cleverly-devised prose or his blood-curling depiction of murders too haunting to mention, I can say, in all certainty, that any reader will thoroughly enjoy his work. The sheer variety with which this collection is filled is, in itself, astounding. Poe's characteristic gothic literature is accompanied, on the one hand, by detailed recountings of an aeronautical fraud and quasi-mythical tales of the Norwegian Maelström; on the other, by surprisingly adventurous quests for hidden treasure and mind-twisting Doylian mockeries of the Parisian Gendarmes by a certain, almost bewilderingly perceptive Monsieur Dupin (notice Poe's clever play on words here). To conclude, I must say that "The Best Short Stories of Edgar Allan Poe" is one of the most surprising collections I have had the pleasure of reading. Expecting but gruesome tales of clandestinely committed murders, I was immediately enchanted by Poe's seductive style and blatantly powerful intellect. I often say this, but Poe is an author who must, without fault, be read.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Naji Tawk

    When you read these investigative short stories, your analytical soul will thrive.

  30. 4 out of 5

    James

    The works of Edgar Allan Poe are every bit as enigmatic as their author. Poe’s talent for writing short stories is outstanding, but when you include his poetry you start to scratch the surface of the complexities of the man. A man that perhaps needed to always be on the edge of madness to write the stories he wrote. A contemporary of Dicken’s, though they never met the did exchange correspondence and gave praise to one another’s work publicly. Poe still is and has for nearly 200 years, been the s The works of Edgar Allan Poe are every bit as enigmatic as their author. Poe’s talent for writing short stories is outstanding, but when you include his poetry you start to scratch the surface of the complexities of the man. A man that perhaps needed to always be on the edge of madness to write the stories he wrote. A contemporary of Dicken’s, though they never met the did exchange correspondence and gave praise to one another’s work publicly. Poe still is and has for nearly 200 years, been the sort of Marilyn Manson of literature, with his obsessive and unrelenting pursuit of the macabre and phantasmagoric. And Poe is to be thought of as no early day horror writer, no, Poe’s ability to make you uncomfortable after the very fist sentence, is as a result of his verbose, grandiloquent, tumescent style; evil is made to feel more sinister when expressed by the erudite. Poe quite often writes his stories as 1st person narratives, thus placing the voice of the story within reach of his latest neurotic manifestation of evil, and a slow death. You don’t read Poe, you wrestle with him, through a variety of settings, but always along the razors edge of sanity. You don’t really ever enjoy Poe, but more endure him.

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