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Archaeological Insights into the Custer Battle: An Assessment of the 1984 Field Season

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In August, 1983, a grassfire raged up Deep Ravine and across the dry, grass-covered battlefield where, in 1876, men of the Seventh U.S. Cavalry under George Armstrong Custer had fought and died at the hands of a Sioux and Cheyenne force led by Sitting Bull. The removal of the normally dense ground cover revealed enough evidence to suggest that an archaeological survey woul In August, 1983, a grassfire raged up Deep Ravine and across the dry, grass-covered battlefield where, in 1876, men of the Seventh U.S. Cavalry under George Armstrong Custer had fought and died at the hands of a Sioux and Cheyenne force led by Sitting Bull. The removal of the normally dense ground cover revealed enough evidence to suggest that an archaeological survey would be fruitful and perhaps could address some unanswered questions about the battle. Describing archaeological investigations during the first year (1984) of a two-year survey, this book offers a detailed analysis of the physical evidence remaining after the battle. Precise information regarding the locations of artifacts and painstaking analyses of the artifacts themselves have uncovered much new information about the guns used in the battle by the victorious Indian warriors. Not only have the types of guns been identified, but through the use of archaeological and criminal-investigative techniques the actual numbers of firearms can now be estimated. This analysis of the battlefield, which represents a significant advance in methodology, shows that the two forces left artifacts in what can be defined as "combatant patterns." What did happen after Custer’s trumpeter, John Martin-dispatched with an order for Captain Benteen to "be quick"-turned and saw the doomed battalion for the last time? Written to satisfy both professional and layman, this book is a vital complement to the historical record.


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In August, 1983, a grassfire raged up Deep Ravine and across the dry, grass-covered battlefield where, in 1876, men of the Seventh U.S. Cavalry under George Armstrong Custer had fought and died at the hands of a Sioux and Cheyenne force led by Sitting Bull. The removal of the normally dense ground cover revealed enough evidence to suggest that an archaeological survey woul In August, 1983, a grassfire raged up Deep Ravine and across the dry, grass-covered battlefield where, in 1876, men of the Seventh U.S. Cavalry under George Armstrong Custer had fought and died at the hands of a Sioux and Cheyenne force led by Sitting Bull. The removal of the normally dense ground cover revealed enough evidence to suggest that an archaeological survey would be fruitful and perhaps could address some unanswered questions about the battle. Describing archaeological investigations during the first year (1984) of a two-year survey, this book offers a detailed analysis of the physical evidence remaining after the battle. Precise information regarding the locations of artifacts and painstaking analyses of the artifacts themselves have uncovered much new information about the guns used in the battle by the victorious Indian warriors. Not only have the types of guns been identified, but through the use of archaeological and criminal-investigative techniques the actual numbers of firearms can now be estimated. This analysis of the battlefield, which represents a significant advance in methodology, shows that the two forces left artifacts in what can be defined as "combatant patterns." What did happen after Custer’s trumpeter, John Martin-dispatched with an order for Captain Benteen to "be quick"-turned and saw the doomed battalion for the last time? Written to satisfy both professional and layman, this book is a vital complement to the historical record.

28 review for Archaeological Insights into the Custer Battle: An Assessment of the 1984 Field Season

  1. 4 out of 5

    Iain

    An interesting look at the archaeology and flow of the final stages of the battle of the Little Bighorn. By necessity it's dry and academic. I look forward to reading the followup by Douglas Scott that continues the field study and perhaps fleshes out more of the vignettes. The vignettes presented in this book's conclusion are rather poignant, focusing as they do on the remains of two men found far from any of their comrades. It postulates their last moments from the handfuls of bone fragments, An interesting look at the archaeology and flow of the final stages of the battle of the Little Bighorn. By necessity it's dry and academic. I look forward to reading the followup by Douglas Scott that continues the field study and perhaps fleshes out more of the vignettes. The vignettes presented in this book's conclusion are rather poignant, focusing as they do on the remains of two men found far from any of their comrades. It postulates their last moments from the handfuls of bone fragments, bullets, and shells left scattered across the Montana prairie. Recommended for those interested in the battle, but probably too dry for most other readers.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Roger

    Review on my blog here http://aviewoverthebell.blogspot.com.... Review on my blog here http://aviewoverthebell.blogspot.com....

  3. 4 out of 5

    Carl Wells

  4. 5 out of 5

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  5. 4 out of 5

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  7. 5 out of 5

    Wayne Taylor

  8. 5 out of 5

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  9. 5 out of 5

    Arigbabuwo Abdmajid

  10. 5 out of 5

    John

  11. 5 out of 5

    Yvette

  12. 4 out of 5

    Matthew Mckinney

  13. 5 out of 5

    Will Kastner

  14. 5 out of 5

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  15. 4 out of 5

    Barry

  16. 5 out of 5

    James P. Daze

  17. 4 out of 5

    Nancy Ayotte

  18. 4 out of 5

    Tom Cheche

  19. 4 out of 5

    Linda "The Book Lady" Warner

  20. 5 out of 5

    Megan

  21. 5 out of 5

    Laura

  22. 5 out of 5

    Dawn Petersen

  23. 4 out of 5

    Gary

  24. 5 out of 5

    BookDB

  25. 5 out of 5

    Colby

  26. 5 out of 5

    Mark Anderson

  27. 5 out of 5

    Elizabeth Stevens

  28. 5 out of 5

    Eva North

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