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Hans Christian Andersen: Best Loved Fairy Tales

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Includes a collection of fairy tales and stories such as "Thumbelina," "The Little Match Girl," "The Princess and the Pea," "The Red Shoes," "The Wild Swans," and his fantasy masterpiece "The Snow-Queen."


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Includes a collection of fairy tales and stories such as "Thumbelina," "The Little Match Girl," "The Princess and the Pea," "The Red Shoes," "The Wild Swans," and his fantasy masterpiece "The Snow-Queen."

30 review for Hans Christian Andersen: Best Loved Fairy Tales

  1. 4 out of 5

    Ama

    This is a wonderful collection of Anderson's best loved stories. These tales takes you into a magical world which makes the reader forget everything. The beautiful language used is mesmerizing and the illustrations are equally fascinating.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Nicole

    A classic collection of stories that are quite famous. Many have been adapted to Disney films though Disney did not stay close to the story lines. My favorite stories thus far are the emperor's new clothes, thumbelina, the little mermaid, and the ugly duckling.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Jackie

    Found this at Barnes and Noble today in the Bargain Price section. I can't wait to get started reading this book. I want to compare the original stories with the Disney ones.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Michelle Roberts

    Man, there are some boring and weird tales here. So . . . I actually only read the popular ones: Little Mermaid, Snow Queen, etc.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Megan Wick

    My mom used to read me bedtime stories from Hans Christian Anderson’s collection of fairytales. I reread The Little Match Girl. It was one of my favorites as a child because I remember how much emotion my mom had in her voice as she read it. I also enjoyed the imagery described by the girl throughout her night. As I read today, I realized how depressing her story actually is. I also read The Little Mermaid. I thought this story would be neat to compare to Disney’s version. To my surprise, Anders My mom used to read me bedtime stories from Hans Christian Anderson’s collection of fairytales. I reread The Little Match Girl. It was one of my favorites as a child because I remember how much emotion my mom had in her voice as she read it. I also enjoyed the imagery described by the girl throughout her night. As I read today, I realized how depressing her story actually is. I also read The Little Mermaid. I thought this story would be neat to compare to Disney’s version. To my surprise, Anderson’s take was a lot darker. He didn’t include an obvious moral for a child to pick up on yet somehow Disney sculpted a beautiful classic out of the material. The reoccurring theme in Anderson’s work seems to lack love and lightness of a usual fairytale. His characters seem to experience traumatic, devastating events and his stories don’t end with a happily ever after. These ideas make me wonder how his work became so popular for Disney to engage with. Reading these two fairytales as an adult, I think there are many philosophical questions to be asked. I think I would only read his stories to my own children because it’s sentimental. The collection might go into my classroom library because I don’t think students would see past the illusions Disney has created.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Nicole

    An inanimate object or person suffers from hubris, low self-esteem, or falls in love. Something terrible happens in a bizarrely nonchalant manner. The appropriate parties are punished. We've all been morally enlightened. It's difficult to critique stories like these, since they are the basis of so many things we know and love. Ideas about many of Andersen's subjects have been so deeply ingrained in us, it's difficult to unwind those perceptions and look at the stories for what they were in their An inanimate object or person suffers from hubris, low self-esteem, or falls in love. Something terrible happens in a bizarrely nonchalant manner. The appropriate parties are punished. We've all been morally enlightened. It's difficult to critique stories like these, since they are the basis of so many things we know and love. Ideas about many of Andersen's subjects have been so deeply ingrained in us, it's difficult to unwind those perceptions and look at the stories for what they were in their time or to experience them as if they were brand new to us. What I'm saying is, I understand their value. But I look at this volume as something I would enjoy using more as a reference while I'm writing poetry, short stories, or essays. I attempted to read it straight through and have to admit that I didn't make it, even just reading three a day. It is just so exactly what you'd expect with only a few exceptions, a few little quips that jolt you out of the rhythm of the story. To be honest, my reaction was, "Meh." And I so did not want my reaction to be, "Meh." Even if I was a child and I had the option to read Andersen for a bedtime story, I'd probably only want to get this out once a month. And I certainly wouldn't pick any of the numerous stories about sentient household items (btdubs, not anywhere close to as exciting as those in Beauty and the Beast). As a kid, I wouldn't have cared a fig about the moral travesties of a narcissistic darning needle.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Angie

    It's hard to rate a book with so many different stories, especially since it took me almost an entire year to read this, but I'll give it a shot. To be honest, most of these fairy tales are forgettable, pointless, and/or just feel unfinished, as if Andersen sat down to write, lost interest a couple pages in, and moved on to something else. Some, however, are very good. It seems like the sadder the story, the better the writing—I especially enjoyed The Little Mermaid, The Traveling Companion, and It's hard to rate a book with so many different stories, especially since it took me almost an entire year to read this, but I'll give it a shot. To be honest, most of these fairy tales are forgettable, pointless, and/or just feel unfinished, as if Andersen sat down to write, lost interest a couple pages in, and moved on to something else. Some, however, are very good. It seems like the sadder the story, the better the writing—I especially enjoyed The Little Mermaid, The Traveling Companion, and The Ice Maiden. There are several more I don't remember the titles of that I'm still thinking about; some of the choices these characters have to make are especially heartbreaking. Others I remember because the moral of the story is so outdated—like the one about the husband always being right. Andersen seems to have a thing for inanimate objects coming to life, sad trees, winter, and the wind/moon telling stories. I think the number one lesson he has to teach us, though, is to not fall in love. Hardly anything good ever happens to his characters who sought love (at least, not until they die after much suffering and get their reward in heaven).

  8. 5 out of 5

    Kristen (belles_bookshelves)

    "If one writes down one’s thoughts, they are poetry." A beautiful and endearing collection of some of the most famous fairytales of any children's lives (including Thumbelina, The Ugly Duckling, The Emperor's New Clothes, The Snow Queen, and The Little Mermaid). Great bedtime stories for children or adults of any age! "If one writes down one’s thoughts, they are poetry." A beautiful and endearing collection of some of the most famous fairytales of any children's lives (including Thumbelina, The Ugly Duckling, The Emperor's New Clothes, The Snow Queen, and The Little Mermaid). Great bedtime stories for children or adults of any age!

  9. 5 out of 5

    Daniel Stoneburgh

    Wonderful collection of Andersen's better known works. Very approachable; allows the reader to take in the tales at their own pace. Many of Andersen's tales require some reflection-- the more, the better-- and this is the perfect collection with which to do so. While his most popular tales have been told and retold, you'll find many hidden gems that excite, engage, and give pause for contemplation. All-in-all, a great work to add to your collection.

  10. 5 out of 5

    AddyTheAnnoyingCritic

    A great collection of fairytales! Most of his stories are about random objects, like a Christmas tree, a pin, a flower, ect. Others are about fairies and animals. A good amount are about good people outwitting the villain. They are squeaky clean, too. These stories are great, I hope you read them!

  11. 4 out of 5

    Susan Cleaver

    I have not finished this one and probably never will. It would take a long log time. Many of the stories are different from the versions we learned. I read some familiar ones and some I had never heard of. If we had no TV or technology, than it would make for entertaining reading for the family around a warm fireplace.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Brittany

    This is a great book full of our most cherished childhood fairytales. I enjoyed most of the fairytales that I grew up with as a kid like The Little Mermaid. If you want to read a book full of the best fairytales then pick this one up!

  13. 5 out of 5

    Claire

    Perfect Musical Pairing: Cosmic Love by Florence + The Machine --------------------- These beautiful tales are like shards of colored glass: delicate, glittering, and razor-sharp. Hold them gently and with great care.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Paige

    Thoroughly enjoyed rereading some of my favorite fairy tales. Dear old Hans never fails to take me back to my childhood.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Tiyana Evans

    It's a great book that I pull off the shelf and randomly choose a story. I think it's fun to read when you're just relaxing.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Carlsson

  17. 4 out of 5

    Mark

  18. 4 out of 5

    PetraVania

  19. 4 out of 5

    Ilze

  20. 5 out of 5

    Lessa

  21. 5 out of 5

    Jet John

  22. 5 out of 5

    Spencer Dubay

  23. 4 out of 5

    HyeJin Starlight

  24. 4 out of 5

    Natasha Mcgain

  25. 5 out of 5

    Melissa Areland

  26. 4 out of 5

    Jacob Parker

  27. 4 out of 5

    Rachel

  28. 5 out of 5

    Betty Bowersox

  29. 5 out of 5

    Ariza Zubia

  30. 5 out of 5

    Emily Breitbarth

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