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Hetch Hetchy: Undoing a Great American Mistake

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In the 1920's the thirsty city of San Francisco reached deep into Yosemite National Park to build the O'Shaughnessy Dam on the Tuolumne River, diverting one-third of the river's water and flooding the Hetch Hetchy Valley, said at the time to be as magnificent as Yosemite Valley itself. The water that flows through tunnels and pipelines into the households of San Francisco In the 1920's the thirsty city of San Francisco reached deep into Yosemite National Park to build the O'Shaughnessy Dam on the Tuolumne River, diverting one-third of the river's water and flooding the Hetch Hetchy Valley, said at the time to be as magnificent as Yosemite Valley itself. The water that flows through tunnels and pipelines into the households of San Francisco is steeped in the resulting heated debates, which began over a century ago and burn to this day. Examining the stunning engineering feat that the dam represented to some when it was constructed, as well as the heartbreak of others, such as John Muir, over the loss of a valley as radiant as any in Yosemite National Park, award-winning nature writer Kenneth Brower's Hetch Hetchy: Undoing a Great American Mistake is a tribute to the men and women whose lives were shaped by those waters, and the wild landscape that still exists beneath them.


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In the 1920's the thirsty city of San Francisco reached deep into Yosemite National Park to build the O'Shaughnessy Dam on the Tuolumne River, diverting one-third of the river's water and flooding the Hetch Hetchy Valley, said at the time to be as magnificent as Yosemite Valley itself. The water that flows through tunnels and pipelines into the households of San Francisco In the 1920's the thirsty city of San Francisco reached deep into Yosemite National Park to build the O'Shaughnessy Dam on the Tuolumne River, diverting one-third of the river's water and flooding the Hetch Hetchy Valley, said at the time to be as magnificent as Yosemite Valley itself. The water that flows through tunnels and pipelines into the households of San Francisco is steeped in the resulting heated debates, which began over a century ago and burn to this day. Examining the stunning engineering feat that the dam represented to some when it was constructed, as well as the heartbreak of others, such as John Muir, over the loss of a valley as radiant as any in Yosemite National Park, award-winning nature writer Kenneth Brower's Hetch Hetchy: Undoing a Great American Mistake is a tribute to the men and women whose lives were shaped by those waters, and the wild landscape that still exists beneath them.

30 review for Hetch Hetchy: Undoing a Great American Mistake

  1. 4 out of 5

    Donnell

    So wonderful that this book is here--putting a light on the tragic loss of a beautiful valley.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Pamela

  3. 4 out of 5

    Joannmorreale

  4. 4 out of 5

    Robert

  5. 5 out of 5

    Constance

  6. 4 out of 5

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  7. 5 out of 5

    Inlandia Institute

  8. 4 out of 5

    Jamie Gray

  9. 4 out of 5

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  10. 5 out of 5

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  11. 5 out of 5

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  12. 4 out of 5

    Molly

  13. 5 out of 5

    Nate Williams

  14. 5 out of 5

    Curt

  15. 4 out of 5

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  16. 5 out of 5

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  17. 4 out of 5

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  18. 5 out of 5

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  19. 5 out of 5

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  20. 5 out of 5

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  21. 5 out of 5

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  22. 5 out of 5

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  23. 5 out of 5

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  24. 4 out of 5

    Andrew

  25. 5 out of 5

    Eric

  26. 5 out of 5

    Amy Baer

  27. 5 out of 5

    Jeff

  28. 4 out of 5

    Chloe Cruz

  29. 4 out of 5

    Mike

  30. 5 out of 5

    Kody

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