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Education for Critical Consciousness (Impacts)

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'Freire combines a compassion for the wretched of the earth with an intellectual and practical confidence and personal humility... Most of all he has a vision of man.' Times Higher Educational Supplement most influential writer and thinker on education in the late twentieth century. His seminal work Pedagogy of the Oppressed has sold almost 1 million copies. revolutionary 'Freire combines a compassion for the wretched of the earth with an intellectual and practical confidence and personal humility... Most of all he has a vision of man.' Times Higher Educational Supplement most influential writer and thinker on education in the late twentieth century. His seminal work Pedagogy of the Oppressed has sold almost 1 million copies. revolutionary method of education. It takes the life situation of the learner as its starting point and the raising of consciousness and the overcoming of obstacles as its goals. For Freire, man's striving for his own humanity requires the changing of structures which dehumanise both the oppressor and the oppressed, rather than therapy.


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'Freire combines a compassion for the wretched of the earth with an intellectual and practical confidence and personal humility... Most of all he has a vision of man.' Times Higher Educational Supplement most influential writer and thinker on education in the late twentieth century. His seminal work Pedagogy of the Oppressed has sold almost 1 million copies. revolutionary 'Freire combines a compassion for the wretched of the earth with an intellectual and practical confidence and personal humility... Most of all he has a vision of man.' Times Higher Educational Supplement most influential writer and thinker on education in the late twentieth century. His seminal work Pedagogy of the Oppressed has sold almost 1 million copies. revolutionary method of education. It takes the life situation of the learner as its starting point and the raising of consciousness and the overcoming of obstacles as its goals. For Freire, man's striving for his own humanity requires the changing of structures which dehumanise both the oppressor and the oppressed, rather than therapy.

30 review for Education for Critical Consciousness (Impacts)

  1. 5 out of 5

    Zach

    This is my second time reading this book in the last year, and the vistas it opens up continue to expand. Freire’s exploration of the problematizing method is layered and thoughtful. This is a brief book, but that’s like saying it doesn’t take very long to see a beautiful sunrise. This book helps layout the approach for overturning the pedagogy of the oppressed and combating the banking model of education (teacher deposits information into students). The solution is put forward in The Pedagogy o This is my second time reading this book in the last year, and the vistas it opens up continue to expand. Freire’s exploration of the problematizing method is layered and thoughtful. This is a brief book, but that’s like saying it doesn’t take very long to see a beautiful sunrise. This book helps layout the approach for overturning the pedagogy of the oppressed and combating the banking model of education (teacher deposits information into students). The solution is put forward in The Pedagogy of the Oppressed, but in this book the problem focused model of education is more fully developed. The approach is geared toward the cultural realities in Chile and Brazil, so it must be adapted by the reader in order to apply the education for critical consciousness to the various cultural realities in the United States, but the adaptation is not too hard to envision. The banking model of education is the overemphasis on didactic teaching (lecture) and of course, the glut of standardized testing -- overall, the banking model assigns a passive role to the student. The problem focused model of education can be exhibited in the classroom through inquiry based instruction and genuine seminars. The problem focused model of education allows for education for critical consciousness through the students' dynamic interaction with questions, the open-ended questions of the inquiry process. The dialogue in the seminars between the teacher and the students does NOT consist of the teacher approving of the knowledge the students repeat (after having heard it from the teacher). The dialogue in the seminar consists of the students and the teacher exploring open-ended questions without assumptions of correct answers -- especially on the teacher's part. This allows for the students to discover knowledge/understanding on their own, and in this discovery, a transformation of the world takes place. This transformation expresses the true aim of education (as Freire explains it): the practice of freedom -- in understanding & making meaning of the world. Anything less than the problem focused model of education amounts to the domestication of humans -- the taming of people, taking away the freedom of thought & critical thinking that allows for praxis. As Freire defines it, praxis is the combination of action and reflection, and it's what separates humans from being brute animals. The combination of action & reflection isn't possible for students (and citizens at large) who have been domesticated by the banking model of education -- only conditioned responses to advertising & propaganda are possible. One of the most important aspects of Education for Critical Consciousness that I haven't mentioned is the importance of the teacher understanding, empathizing, and valuing the point of view & cultural background of each student. If teachers don't take the time to do this, then they are essentially performing cultural invasion and are acting in the realm of domestication. What's the biggest reason teachers don't use the problem focused model of education? One reason is the fact that nearly the entire education system (K-16) is rigged towards the banking model of education. Freire nails another reason: many teachers, when faced with knowable objects, "are incapable of taking up a cognitive position. They remain in the realm of 'doxa' beyond which they are the mere repeaters of texts read but not known." Education for Critical Consciousness excels at explicitly showing how an education system can function through oppression & manipulation to create domesticated animals, and it also excels at showing how education can create people who can actually think for themselves.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Ray Carroll

    Though Freire's analysis of the "dialogue" required for any education to be necessarily transformative can be easily applied to more contemporary ideas of decolonizing education, the failure to synthesize Brazilian women into his vision of radical "historical participation" leaves much to be desired. Though Freire's analysis of the "dialogue" required for any education to be necessarily transformative can be easily applied to more contemporary ideas of decolonizing education, the failure to synthesize Brazilian women into his vision of radical "historical participation" leaves much to be desired.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Brett Morrow

    This is an amazing and inspiring book for any educator that has felt that the current/historical way of teaching leads to the continual submission to authority instead of the liberation on the individual.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Michelle

    Note to self: Re-Read this book.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Julia Leporace

    "Knowing, whatever its level, is not the act by which a Subject transformed into an object docilely and passively accepts the contents others give or impose on him or her. Knowledge, on the contrary, necessitates the curious presence of Subjects confronted with the world. It requires their transforming action on reality. It demands a constant searching. It implies invention and re-invention. It claims from each person a critical reflection on the very act of knowing. It must be a reflection whic "Knowing, whatever its level, is not the act by which a Subject transformed into an object docilely and passively accepts the contents others give or impose on him or her. Knowledge, on the contrary, necessitates the curious presence of Subjects confronted with the world. It requires their transforming action on reality. It demands a constant searching. It implies invention and re-invention. It claims from each person a critical reflection on the very act of knowing. It must be a reflection which recognizes the knowing process, and in this recognition becomes aware of the "raison d'être" behind the knowing and the conditioning to which that process is subject."

  6. 5 out of 5

    Nam Do

    Very good philosophical + sociological observations of authoritarian societies and of democratic education, yet the simplistic view of the world (black or white only) and the overuse of jargons and unfamiliar terms (which ironically tells how aloof an educator Paulo is) gave the book some setbacks. Overall its pretty damn good.

  7. 4 out of 5

    sam howie

    Although quite specific on subject matter, that of teaching illiterate adults in South America, Freire is such an incredible humanist with ideas that are fundamental and transcend to education as a whole.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Aaron El Sabrout

    Really interesting and useful methodologies for teaching and learning with folks. A bit frustrating that it's book about how it's necessary to engage with people as equals for anyone to learn, but he still refers to some people as "naive" and "primitive." Really interesting and useful methodologies for teaching and learning with folks. A bit frustrating that it's book about how it's necessary to engage with people as equals for anyone to learn, but he still refers to some people as "naive" and "primitive."

  9. 4 out of 5

    Sherwin

    A revolutionary brief text for teachers who wish to learn the way of understanding, instead of what is understood.It effected my style of teaching.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Helen Perks

    My favourite Freire so far. More practical. Very inspiring.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Bill DeGenaro

    Thin volume that covers material more fully fleshed out in Pedagogy of the Oppressed, but with added emphasis on the gradual and incremental move from "massification" to "education." Thin volume that covers material more fully fleshed out in Pedagogy of the Oppressed, but with added emphasis on the gradual and incremental move from "massification" to "education."

  12. 5 out of 5

    Georg Ivanov

    Brazilian society in the mid of 60's was permeated by analfabetism and it was the major force that prevented poor people to take part in the political scene. Freire's work on education was not only a goodwill service for society. It was a truly revolutionary idea, and the military coup was a counter-revolution to stop the transformation that Goulart's government was commited to. Good to understand why president Bolsinaro is against preserving Freire's memory. Recommend it. A sociedade brasileira Brazilian society in the mid of 60's was permeated by analfabetism and it was the major force that prevented poor people to take part in the political scene. Freire's work on education was not only a goodwill service for society. It was a truly revolutionary idea, and the military coup was a counter-revolution to stop the transformation that Goulart's government was commited to. Good to understand why president Bolsinaro is against preserving Freire's memory. Recommend it. A sociedade brasileira nos meados dos anos 60 era permeada pelo analfabetismo e ele era a principal força que previnia os pobres de tomarem parte na política. O trabalho de Freire na educação não era simplesmente um serviço de boa vontade para a sociedade. Era uma verdadeira ideia revolucionária e o golpe militar foi uma contra-revolução para frear a transformação que o governo de Goulart estava comprometido a fazer. Bom para entender o porquê do presidente Bolsonaro ser contra a preservação da memória de Freire. Recomendo.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Maddie

    Studied this in "Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages" (TESOL). Freire was a brilliant, compassionate scholar with a shrewd eye for the underlying oppressions in our society's education. An oasis of theory for educators, linguists, librarians and the like. Studied this in "Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages" (TESOL). Freire was a brilliant, compassionate scholar with a shrewd eye for the underlying oppressions in our society's education. An oasis of theory for educators, linguists, librarians and the like.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Nick

    This book on "critical pedagogy" opened up a whole new world to me. Next up is Friere's classic in the field: Pedagogy of the Oppressed. This book on "critical pedagogy" opened up a whole new world to me. Next up is Friere's classic in the field: Pedagogy of the Oppressed.

  15. 4 out of 5

    SoulScream

    A great read for anyone who is connected with the educational system in one way or another. Anyone who claims to be an educator should read this.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Carolina

    A must to read for any educator

  17. 5 out of 5

    Mai Ali

    One of my favorite reads for Freire

  18. 4 out of 5

    Alex

    In this book, Friere continues to build on his theories of education. He begins by looking at a society in transition, and spends some time differentiating between radicalism and sectarianism. The radical submits his or her actions to reflection, while the sectarian is largely uncritical and concerned more with pushing ideology. The radical necessarily engages in dialogue, as it is necessary to continually refine theory with experience, while the sectarian utilizes propaganda as a way to massify In this book, Friere continues to build on his theories of education. He begins by looking at a society in transition, and spends some time differentiating between radicalism and sectarianism. The radical submits his or her actions to reflection, while the sectarian is largely uncritical and concerned more with pushing ideology. The radical necessarily engages in dialogue, as it is necessary to continually refine theory with experience, while the sectarian utilizes propaganda as a way to massify change. Friere argues that in order for an individual to be truly educated, he/she must understand the context in which they are situated. In this sense, an individual cannot be passively injected with knowledge, as this process denies the capacity of an individual to investigate the multifaceted aspects of life. The educator must recognize a shared humanity and struggle with the educatee to develop critical consciousness. Also included in this text is a set of illustrated ‘situations’ which can be used as teaching tools for literacy and consciousness raising. Each illustration has an accompanying description that gives a kind of mock scenario in which the individual is situated, as a way to gain insight into the social and cultural context. The book ends with Extension or Communication, an essay in which Friere argues the importance of semantics in education. Building on the rest of the text, he argues that extension is inherently dehumanizing, because it serves as a mode of passing on knowledge in which the educator is the expert and the student is simply an empty vessel to be filled. Communication, on the other hand, is an encounter with the other, in which the person’s humanity is fully recognized. There is a shared search for significance.

  19. 4 out of 5

    TC

    The Introduction to Education for Critical Consciousness starts right out with a little something about Freire's dialectical ability to move beyond his own superceded, potentially naive work without totally denigrating it, and I believe that is just about the best descriptor I can gather for this aggregation of two of his earlier essays. The first, Education as the Practice of Freedom, gives a broad exposition of the social dynamics in which Freire's own work was embedded - of Brazil's historical The Introduction to Education for Critical Consciousness starts right out with a little something about Freire's dialectical ability to move beyond his own superceded, potentially naive work without totally denigrating it, and I believe that is just about the best descriptor I can gather for this aggregation of two of his earlier essays. The first, Education as the Practice of Freedom, gives a broad exposition of the social dynamics in which Freire's own work was embedded - of Brazil's historical superimposition of European strucures and the requisite massification - before diving into the particulars of his own methodology with the initially "semi-intransitively conscious" peasants of early-mid-60's Brazil. The second, Extension or Communication, while spending much energy in a Jared Diamond-esque chewing of the theoretical cud on the inherent difference between coercive, propagandistic, purely technocratic rural extension, and an education that enables both educator-educatee and educatee-educator Subjects to examine the social relations that result in the latter's own cultural milieu, does serve as the core of his thinking, and can be seen very much as the precursor to Pedagogy of the Oppressed, as well as being embodied in all subsequent Participary approaches to the project cycle, in development parlance. Basically, education with, not for. All development is modernization, but all modernization is not development. Dialogue, not "communiques." Solidarity, not charity. Point taken.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Jessica

    questions (primarily to j): of those i borrowed, are there any books you'd particularly like back this weekend (off hand i remember this, hagakure, weil, leduc)? &&, aside from finding it discussion-worthy that freire also uses the "[culture:] waves" concept, is all this stuff about epochal transition (while super interesting/awesome) already outdated? is it even possible anymore to grasp any epoch as it occurs, let alone "intervene in reality" to reach the sort of integration he talks about in as questions (primarily to j): of those i borrowed, are there any books you'd particularly like back this weekend (off hand i remember this, hagakure, weil, leduc)? &&, aside from finding it discussion-worthy that freire also uses the "[culture:] waves" concept, is all this stuff about epochal transition (while super interesting/awesome) already outdated? is it even possible anymore to grasp any epoch as it occurs, let alone "intervene in reality" to reach the sort of integration he talks about in asserting the self as subject (regardless of education)? & if not, would that be a tiny part of why all of the symptoms of the adaptive man --- imprisoned in the present, "crushed, diminished," facing the "dynamic of transition" with "tragic hopelessness & generalized fear" --- just kinda sound like everyone? or am i hanging out with the wrong crowd? p.s. can i be in yr fancy badiou club? peripherally?

  21. 5 out of 5

    Steph

    I found this text to be quite abstract and at times contradictory. It's filled with jargon, which I found odd considering the subject matter (how can any society aim for critical consciousness when this idea is theorized in such abstract terms that appeal only to intellectuals or academics?). The concepts of this text exist in obscure, intellectualized realms and so any connection to real-life experiences is completely lacking. I was also distracted by Freire's default to masculine pronouns--wom I found this text to be quite abstract and at times contradictory. It's filled with jargon, which I found odd considering the subject matter (how can any society aim for critical consciousness when this idea is theorized in such abstract terms that appeal only to intellectuals or academics?). The concepts of this text exist in obscure, intellectualized realms and so any connection to real-life experiences is completely lacking. I was also distracted by Freire's default to masculine pronouns--women are mentioned (a few times), but are not agents within Freire's conceptualizations. The repetitiveness of his concepts & ideas seem to mask the fact that there is no real theoretical development here. I was surprisingly disappointed considering how often I have heard Freire cited and discussed.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Kadine

    In this book, Freire essentially provides a guideline for achieving the epistemological ideal: consciousness-raising, a forever evolving process of how we come to know - with a specific focus on the institution of education. Freire does so by using Brazil as a starting point, and tremendously unpacks a number of critical issues present in today's academic domain. Basically, if you are interested in radically changing the way we think in our culturally specific education institutions, this book i In this book, Freire essentially provides a guideline for achieving the epistemological ideal: consciousness-raising, a forever evolving process of how we come to know - with a specific focus on the institution of education. Freire does so by using Brazil as a starting point, and tremendously unpacks a number of critical issues present in today's academic domain. Basically, if you are interested in radically changing the way we think in our culturally specific education institutions, this book is for you. If the practice of critical self-reflection as a gateway to mental growth is a lifestyle of yours, this book is for you. If you believe in the collective and that the collective must not remain mentally or ideologically stagnant, this book is for you.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Kelly Tavares

    focus on education theorists who analyzed democracy as a group of social practices to promote social welfare. As means to engage individuals and promote change on a systemic level in societies. Many different practitioners and researchers have recognized and practiced democracy in their lives (Dewey, 1916; Freire, 1998). They developed the basis to rethink community development, educational reform and critical thinking. They inspire movements throughout different fields of knowledge and research focus on education theorists who analyzed democracy as a group of social practices to promote social welfare. As means to engage individuals and promote change on a systemic level in societies. Many different practitioners and researchers have recognized and practiced democracy in their lives (Dewey, 1916; Freire, 1998). They developed the basis to rethink community development, educational reform and critical thinking. They inspire movements throughout different fields of knowledge and research on civic engagement.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Shay Akil McLean

    Excellent book in regards to discussing the philosophy, theory, & politics as critical components of education as well as demonstrating how education is a tool for teaching people critical thinking NOT teaching them to parrot random statements fed by society. The book also provides an amazing format for creating a Saturday school like program for teaching literacy as well as critical social and political consciousness to underserved & underclass communities. Crucial read for any organizer. Its a Excellent book in regards to discussing the philosophy, theory, & politics as critical components of education as well as demonstrating how education is a tool for teaching people critical thinking NOT teaching them to parrot random statements fed by society. The book also provides an amazing format for creating a Saturday school like program for teaching literacy as well as critical social and political consciousness to underserved & underclass communities. Crucial read for any organizer. Its a quick read, I finished it in under an hour.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Benjamin Britton

    "This undertaking requires something basic from any one of the Subjects participating in it-that they ask themselves if they really believe in the people, in ordinary people, in the peasants. They're capable of communing with them, of "proclaiming" the world with them. If they are incapable of believing in the peasants, communing with them, they will at best be cold technicians. They will probably be technocrats, or even good reformers. But they will never be educators who will carry out radical "This undertaking requires something basic from any one of the Subjects participating in it-that they ask themselves if they really believe in the people, in ordinary people, in the peasants. They're capable of communing with them, of "proclaiming" the world with them. If they are incapable of believing in the peasants, communing with them, they will at best be cold technicians. They will probably be technocrats, or even good reformers. But they will never be educators who will carry out radical transformations." Paulo Freire

  26. 5 out of 5

    Robert Morrow

    This book is one of my educational bibles. It is also an outstanding work on managing culture change through dialogue. A surprisingly easy read due to Freire's clear thinking, the book has great depth and insight. This book is one of my educational bibles. It is also an outstanding work on managing culture change through dialogue. A surprisingly easy read due to Freire's clear thinking, the book has great depth and insight.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Doni

    This gives a more concrete sense of Freire's strategy in implementing radical education, but Pedagogy of the Oppressed is still much better. This gives a more concrete sense of Freire's strategy in implementing radical education, but Pedagogy of the Oppressed is still much better.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Armando Moreno

    It seems like it was talking about any country of Latin America.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Betzabe Torres

    I wish everyone reads this before starting to teach. It should be mandatory in education syllabus

  30. 4 out of 5

    Nathan

    Freire uses the poor working class individuals in Brazil as the basis for this text. Reading this book provides an invaluable insight into what Freire would say is, perhaps, closely related to today's reform movement rooted in socio-economics. The education system has been heralded as a tool of liberation and simultaneously critiqued as a tool of social control to maintain the oppressive status quo. Critical consciousness developed by the advances an educational pedagogy to liberate the masses f Freire uses the poor working class individuals in Brazil as the basis for this text. Reading this book provides an invaluable insight into what Freire would say is, perhaps, closely related to today's reform movement rooted in socio-economics. The education system has been heralded as a tool of liberation and simultaneously critiqued as a tool of social control to maintain the oppressive status quo. Critical consciousness developed by the advances an educational pedagogy to liberate the masses from systemic inequity maintained and perpetuated by process, practices and outcomes of interdependent systems and institutions. If people are not aware of inequity and do not act to constantly resist oppressive norms and ways of being, then the result is residual inequity in perpetuity. If inequity is likened to a disease or poison, then critical consciousness has been deemed the antidote to inequity and the prescription needed to break the cycle. As such, critical consciousness is a construct that has important scholarly, practice and policy implications, particularly as it relates to Education. One highlight of the book that has stayed with me: "There is no such thing as a neutral educational process. Education either functions as an instrument that is used to facilitate the integration of the younger generation into the logic of the present system and bring about conformity to it, or it becomes “the practice of freedom,” the means by which men and women deal critically and creatively with reality and discover how to participate in the transformation of their world." (Freire, 2000, p. 34) Do with that what you will...

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