hits counter Krapp's Last Tape/Not I/A Piece of Monologue/That Time - Ebook PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

Krapp's Last Tape/Not I/A Piece of Monologue/That Time

Availability: Ready to download

Samuel Beckett, one of the great avant-garde Irish dramatists and writers of the second half of the 20th century, was born on 13 April 1906. His centenary will be celebrated throughout 2006 with performances of his major plays, including Waiting for Godot. Here are the two most famous plays for a single actor. Krapp's Last Tape finds an old man, with his tape recorder, mus Samuel Beckett, one of the great avant-garde Irish dramatists and writers of the second half of the 20th century, was born on 13 April 1906. His centenary will be celebrated throughout 2006 with performances of his major plays, including Waiting for Godot. Here are the two most famous plays for a single actor. Krapp's Last Tape finds an old man, with his tape recorder, musing over the past and future. Not I is a remarkable tour de force for a single actress, as a woman emits memories and fears. It follows the highly acclaimed recordings of Beckett's Trilogy, Molloy, Malone Dies and The Unnamable published by Naxos AudioBooks. Directed by John Tydeman.


Compare

Samuel Beckett, one of the great avant-garde Irish dramatists and writers of the second half of the 20th century, was born on 13 April 1906. His centenary will be celebrated throughout 2006 with performances of his major plays, including Waiting for Godot. Here are the two most famous plays for a single actor. Krapp's Last Tape finds an old man, with his tape recorder, mus Samuel Beckett, one of the great avant-garde Irish dramatists and writers of the second half of the 20th century, was born on 13 April 1906. His centenary will be celebrated throughout 2006 with performances of his major plays, including Waiting for Godot. Here are the two most famous plays for a single actor. Krapp's Last Tape finds an old man, with his tape recorder, musing over the past and future. Not I is a remarkable tour de force for a single actress, as a woman emits memories and fears. It follows the highly acclaimed recordings of Beckett's Trilogy, Molloy, Malone Dies and The Unnamable published by Naxos AudioBooks. Directed by John Tydeman.

30 review for Krapp's Last Tape/Not I/A Piece of Monologue/That Time

  1. 5 out of 5

    Dave Schaafsma

    After listening to Waiting for Godot, I decided to listen to some of Beckett’s short monologue plays I enjoyed years ago. “Krapp's Last Tape” is about a 69 year-old man man, with his tape recorder, musing over the past and future. He both listens to memoir tapes he made when he was 39, and makes a new tape now. The tape at 39 features a strong and confident man Krapp now rejects as insufferable, while on that tape the 39 year-old Krapp disdains his 19 year-old self. The 69 year-old Krapp isn’t p After listening to Waiting for Godot, I decided to listen to some of Beckett’s short monologue plays I enjoyed years ago. “Krapp's Last Tape” is about a 69 year-old man man, with his tape recorder, musing over the past and future. He both listens to memoir tapes he made when he was 39, and makes a new tape now. The tape at 39 features a strong and confident man Krapp now rejects as insufferable, while on that tape the 39 year-old Krapp disdains his 19 year-old self. The 69 year-old Krapp isn’t particularly proud of where he is now. The tape he makes is a reflection on the past year, but he has little good to say about it, except that he admits that he has found the word “spool” is a funny word. And he reports that his late book sold 17 copies. It’s a strange and funny short play, not at all linear. “Not I” would be a challenging play for a single actress, as a woman in highly manic fashion talks about her anxieties and fears in a single monologue. Juliet Stevenson actually is the actress in this version that I listened to, and she is hilarious. I hadn’t recalled how lyrical Beckett’s writing can be. And goofy, too, sometimes. A master of language, and sure, sometimes difficult, but never boring.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Aloha

    One of the best audiotape and selections of short stories. If you haven’t read Beckett, this is a great intro. to him. If there’s a most favorite shelf, this would go on it.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Tony

    Well, Samuel Beckett. I listened to these performances whilst following along from 'The Complete Dramatic Works', published by Faber & Faber. I like doing that with poetry and, although these are 'dramatic works' there is a sense of poetry about them. It starts with Krapp's Last Tape, performed by Jim Norton. This was my favourite of the four pieces and I'm going to find a performance of this to watch. There is a John Hurt one, which I think I might have to try and get my grubby little protubera Well, Samuel Beckett. I listened to these performances whilst following along from 'The Complete Dramatic Works', published by Faber & Faber. I like doing that with poetry and, although these are 'dramatic works' there is a sense of poetry about them. It starts with Krapp's Last Tape, performed by Jim Norton. This was my favourite of the four pieces and I'm going to find a performance of this to watch. There is a John Hurt one, which I think I might have to try and get my grubby little protuberances on. A man listens to tapes of his old self. It's more moving than you'd expect because so much is sub-text. Then 'That Time: A/B/C, performed by John Moffatt. Here a man talks to himself about losing himself. It seems like the words of a man who has been broken by something. A wondering, wounded man. Next is 'Not I: Mouth', performed by Juliet Stevenson. This time a woman, also broken in some way, lying in a field delivers a speedy monologue from a mouth that, if we are to believe what we hear, hardly ever speaks. The flow of words is rapid and repetitive. It is also surprisingly moving. Someone who survived through (almost) silence trying to explain something to us that we are never going to entirely understand. Is she dying? Who knows? Who. Knows. Finally, Peter Marinker performs 'A Piece of a Monologue'. If 'Not I: Mouth' is rapid-fire then 'A Piece of a Monologue' is the very opposite. Yet its slowness is as much of a verbal smokescreen as the Mouth's speed. A man, in a room, where the light is barely enough for him to see. Unable to say what needs to be said? Is he trapped in memories at the end of life? Is this a reflection on mortality? It is hard to be certain, but it sounds like the musings of the loneliest person on Earth to me. Beckett, like Pinter, is elusive. You can read what you want into his work and I don't think he'd mind much.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Melissa (ladybug)

    I liked "Krapp's Last Tape" better than "Not I". I really wished I could understand Samuel Beckett's writing. I feel confused because his writings sound more like they are from someone who needs series mental help. I liked "Krapp's Last Tape" better than "Not I". I really wished I could understand Samuel Beckett's writing. I feel confused because his writings sound more like they are from someone who needs series mental help.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Chloé

    A great audio book; appropriate and in keeping with Beckett's dramatic style. The solo-voiced works create an intimate atmosphere and bring his striking pieces to life. I particularly enjoyed Juliet Stevenson's 'Not I: Mouth'; because I like her as an actress and because she has a lovely voice that persuades the listener and encourages empathy and sympathy for the human condition. A great audio book; appropriate and in keeping with Beckett's dramatic style. The solo-voiced works create an intimate atmosphere and bring his striking pieces to life. I particularly enjoyed Juliet Stevenson's 'Not I: Mouth'; because I like her as an actress and because she has a lovely voice that persuades the listener and encourages empathy and sympathy for the human condition.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Leniw

    I like it when a book - or in this case a play - makes me want to read more about it. You finish reading something but still you want to learn more about it. I have no idea how to rate this. I had a very uneasy feeling while reading it. I found myself going back and re-reading a sentence or a paragraph (just like Krapp's tapes). I did like it. It left me thinking for a while. I like it when a book - or in this case a play - makes me want to read more about it. You finish reading something but still you want to learn more about it. I have no idea how to rate this. I had a very uneasy feeling while reading it. I found myself going back and re-reading a sentence or a paragraph (just like Krapp's tapes). I did like it. It left me thinking for a while.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Matthias Vannieuwenhuyze

    Beckett is one of the key writers in what is called the "Theatre of the Absurd". His work became increasingly minimalist in his later career. 'Last Tape' carries his theatrical experiment one step further, reducing the cast of characters to a single human actor, supplemented by a tape recorder playing back the same voice at a much earlier age, with references to still earlier recordings. Beckett is one of the key writers in what is called the "Theatre of the Absurd". His work became increasingly minimalist in his later career. 'Last Tape' carries his theatrical experiment one step further, reducing the cast of characters to a single human actor, supplemented by a tape recorder playing back the same voice at a much earlier age, with references to still earlier recordings.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Steven

    Quintessentially Beckett - Krapp's Last tape is a 1 act, 1 man radio play where an old man plays back recordings of his younger self from 30 years before. Quintessentially Beckett - Krapp's Last tape is a 1 act, 1 man radio play where an old man plays back recordings of his younger self from 30 years before.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Daniel Wright

    The Complete Dramatic Works The Complete Dramatic Works

  10. 4 out of 5

    Chris Lilly

    I think Juliette Stevenson is the finest actor on the planet. This telling of 'Not I' is immense. And quite funny, if bleak makes you mile. I think Juliette Stevenson is the finest actor on the planet. This telling of 'Not I' is immense. And quite funny, if bleak makes you mile.

  11. 4 out of 5

    جابر طاحون

    المأساة /الملهاة /الألم/

  12. 5 out of 5

    Constantinos Sarris

  13. 5 out of 5

    Pierre

  14. 4 out of 5

    Jovana

  15. 4 out of 5

    Edwin Blair

  16. 5 out of 5

    Estelle

  17. 5 out of 5

    Jay

  18. 4 out of 5

    Sereen

  19. 4 out of 5

    Kelly

  20. 4 out of 5

    Eoghan

  21. 5 out of 5

    N

  22. 4 out of 5

    Wolfgang Bas

  23. 4 out of 5

    Katelyn

  24. 5 out of 5

    Keefe

  25. 5 out of 5

    Kristin

  26. 5 out of 5

    MG

  27. 4 out of 5

    Ali

  28. 5 out of 5

    Sandy

  29. 5 out of 5

    Jared Solovei

  30. 4 out of 5

    Justine Seynhaeve

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.