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The sixteen short stories collected here were written between 1891 and 1917 by the Bengali poet, writer, painter, musician and mystic, Sir Rabindranath Tagore (1861-1941). Throughout these stories, Tagore's main interest is people and the kaleidoscope of human emotions, as men and women struggle with the restrictions and prohibitions of contemporary Hindu society. The sixteen short stories collected here were written between 1891 and 1917 by the Bengali poet, writer, painter, musician and mystic, Sir Rabindranath Tagore (1861-1941). Throughout these stories, Tagore's main interest is people and the kaleidoscope of human emotions, as men and women struggle with the restrictions and prohibitions of contemporary Hindu society.


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The sixteen short stories collected here were written between 1891 and 1917 by the Bengali poet, writer, painter, musician and mystic, Sir Rabindranath Tagore (1861-1941). Throughout these stories, Tagore's main interest is people and the kaleidoscope of human emotions, as men and women struggle with the restrictions and prohibitions of contemporary Hindu society. The sixteen short stories collected here were written between 1891 and 1917 by the Bengali poet, writer, painter, musician and mystic, Sir Rabindranath Tagore (1861-1941). Throughout these stories, Tagore's main interest is people and the kaleidoscope of human emotions, as men and women struggle with the restrictions and prohibitions of contemporary Hindu society.

30 review for Short Stories From Rabindranath Tagore

  1. 5 out of 5

    Sanjay Gautam

    The prose of Tagore is mesmerizing which makes you feel enchanted; and often gives you a dose of refreshment. Its beauty lies in the profound insights conveyed in very simple words. Nearly all the stories touch you somewhere deep but it was the story 'Cabulliwalah' that was quite moving for me. The prose of Tagore is mesmerizing which makes you feel enchanted; and often gives you a dose of refreshment. Its beauty lies in the profound insights conveyed in very simple words. Nearly all the stories touch you somewhere deep but it was the story 'Cabulliwalah' that was quite moving for me.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Jan-Maat

    I found this an engaging and lively collection of short stories, I had never read Tagore before, I knew he had won the Nobel prize, and I had the feeling that he was more renowned for his poetry, these stories though felt vital and fresh despite being over a hundred years old, perhaps because they are strongly character driven. Most of the stories began with him introducing one or two characters and unfold through their interactions, the time and the place of the setting mostly Bengal in the 1890 I found this an engaging and lively collection of short stories, I had never read Tagore before, I knew he had won the Nobel prize, and I had the feeling that he was more renowned for his poetry, these stories though felt vital and fresh despite being over a hundred years old, perhaps because they are strongly character driven. Most of the stories began with him introducing one or two characters and unfold through their interactions, the time and the place of the setting mostly Bengal in the 1890s did not feel to be hugely significant and despite (or maybe because) his opposition to British occupation and empire the British seemed to me mostly evident though their absence, his rural Bengal is possibly timeless or slightly removed from the pace of the 1890s in some ways, a few stories take place in Kolkata but mostly they are in the countryside and deal with village life where the big news is about relations between landlord and tenant, fathers and sons, mothers in law and daughters in law. The stories tend to be political rather than Political, touching on social and economic issues - child marriage, dowries, inheritance, at the time Tagore was writing these stories he was running the families ancestral estates, and reading these tales I could imagine him doing a lot of listening, hearing the stories that people told and the problems that were on their minds, I did not get the feeling that he was much inspired by the landscape or by his family roots. In this collection there are thirty stories over 263 or so pages, I do not have enough fingers and toes to work out the average length, but none of these stories is particularly long, Tagore is frequently ironic, my smile to page ratio was pretty good, I am familiar with short stories having a twist at the end but Tagore seemed to prefer a snap -a sudden death or disappearance as though human nature meant that there might be thesis and antithesis, but that synthesis is too much to expect in human life. Thee was a huge variety of stories, realistic ones dealing with social issues, to the supernatural. Dignity I felt was the most common theme, human dignity, the struggle of an individual to assert or maintain dignity, to how dignity is bruised, damaged or denied through a variety of inequalities.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Mrinmayi

    Apparently, the Main Character in one of the stories is named Mrinmayi!!!! I don't know about you guys BUT I have NEVER in my entire life read MY name in either books OR films BUT they adapted the book in a series on Netflix named Stories by Rabindranath Tagore Episode 12 and 13 is named "Samaapti{Conclusion}" The protagonist and I share the same name!!! TBH...when I saw the adaptation...I was more happy to HEAR the actors PRONOUNCE my name correctly xD🤣😂 This is me IRL☝ This has happened ONLY ONCE The Apparently, the Main Character in one of the stories is named Mrinmayi!!!! I don't know about you guys BUT I have NEVER in my entire life read MY name in either books OR films BUT they adapted the book in a series on Netflix named Stories by Rabindranath Tagore Episode 12 and 13 is named "Samaapti{Conclusion}" The protagonist and I share the same name!!! TBH...when I saw the adaptation...I was more happy to HEAR the actors PRONOUNCE my name correctly xD🤣😂 This is me IRL☝ This has happened ONLY ONCE The aunty who said it right is still my fav aunty!!#respect My friend saw this series first and recommended it to me She said that this episode had a "surprise" Soooo when the "Love Interest " said "Mrinmayi" ...I was like.... https://youtu.be/gB-evlal_cM?t=796 Listen to him say my name CORRECTLY!!! *happy tears* Another instance where the MC's mother says her name!! https://youtu.be/gB-evlal_cM?t=1014 *sobbing happily* Now you ALL know how to say my name!! I have NO IDEA why I am SOOOOO excited about this!! (You guys knowing how my name sounds makes me happy!!!!..IDK why!!) maybe it's my MBTI(I am ENFP) I am gonna blame my MBTI for my excitement level over this series!! BUT after watching the show...I am EVEN MORE excited to READ IT!!!! The show has subtitles..so you can watch it... even if you don't know Hindi!! BUT I am still gonna tell you about episode 12 and 13!!! *excited babbling* 🌟So this series is a collection of short stories Episode 12 & 13 revolve around Mrinmayi and Apurba *giggling* I just want to start by saying that I found Mrinmayi to be verrrrrrry relatable (It sounds weird to say or write your own name in review ngl ) I mean the reaction Apurba's mother has after knowing that he wants to marry her(Mrinmayi) was *chefs Kiss* Bahu= Daughter-in-law *Mrin pretends to NOT know how to make a round roti *😎#Staysingle4eva 🌟Ummm..ok back to review Apparently, Mrinmayi(in this series) is too loud, an extrovert, loves spending her time getting into mischief, makes jokes, is kinda immature(?), loves her family more than her crush, is hungry 24/7 xD Can someone count the no. of times I wrote "Mrinmayi" in this review ??!😂 hmm..so now Mrinmayi pulls a prank on Apurba *High fives Mrinmayi* Apurba is a calm, mature, and "serious" person He falls in love with Mrinmayi *Mrin in the background: You gonna regret this dude😂* Here's an extract I got from one of the review sites: His conscious decision to marry this unusual Mrinmayi shatters his mother’s hope for a calm and quite daughter-inlaw She is a Mrinmayi...HOW THE HECK CAN SHE BE QUITE??!!*shouts this sentence* 🌟Now this book is set in the 1900s soooo during that time women had little to no rights Since Apurba is in "lurve" with Mrinmayi...he decides to get married to her NO ONE asks Mrinmayi if SHE wants to get married!!! Now Mrin was pissed IRL...so was the Mrinmayi in the series 🌟What I appreciated was the way the story portrays the power structure during that time period How the Men had more say in a woman's future than the woman herself We see Apurba NOT realizing that he basically manipulated her into the marriage BUT we see an AWESOME character arc!! Look...During their first night Mrinmayi destroys their bed lol She refuses to spend her life with someone she does not even know Now Apurba is SHOCKED that Mrinmayi doesn't love him back*facepalms* But Mrinmayi is like, "No instant love for me dude!!" And trust me this is the slowest slow burn romance you can get!! I have to admit that I felt *slightly* bad for Apurba Cause WE could SEE👀 that he loved her BUT just like Mrinmayi even I was skeptical of him He proved me wrong though!! He was indeed a good person!! He waited for sooooo many months !! And the "groveling" he did was *double chefs kiss* Well...you see...Mrinmayi is really close to her father (Can relate girl) She wants to visit him BUT her evil mother-in-law wouldn't let her go!! Now Apurba takes Mrinmayi to her dad against his mom's wishes (He basically faces the wrath of his own mother for her!!) And the time they spend with her father was just sooo adorable!! I think that's when Mrinmayi and Mrin ..both realized that he is worth a chance but eventually, Mrinmayi and Mrin..both fall for him *sighs* 🌟We have in this series something REALLY important i.e. a Woman's consent I see MANY books and shows skip that even NOW!! But we see how Apurba respects her decision... WAITS for her faithfully !! Gonna be honest here...I thought he would cheat BUT he stays loyal FOREVER!! Even after Mrinmayi says she HATES him!! I know this sounds like having very low standards BUT soo many books have men cheating that these kinda men feel rare!!! Did I mention Apurba is a Bibliophile ??!! (He gets brownie points for that!!) Basically Mrinmayi and Mrin at the beginning My ONLY complaint was that Apurba kept calling her Mrinu ...(I DON'T like this nickname!!) Idk..Mrinu sounds waaaay too intimate xD Ohhh..and other concern was the ending We see that Mrinmayi has finally "calmed down" and her mother- in- law LOVES her all of a sudden SMH It felt like a Bollywood movie IMO I mean Mrinmayi is still loud and extrovert BUT it felt like gave up her fun side Suddenly she became the "ideal" daughter-in-law And ONLY THEN did her mother in law like her!! I mean..I KNOW that you have to behave like a "mature" person after some time BUT you don't give up your OG self!! But we are talking about the 1900s So in hindsight, it was a realistic ending for THAT time period I still enjoyed these episodes though !! Apurba is going on my book boyfriend list!! Mrinmayi's expression while getting married xD😂 Apurba waiting patiently after Mrinmayi ran away😱🤣 Apurba excited about marriage while Mrinmayi just wants to go back home I know this review is of the series rather than the book BUT I still wrote it this review is special for ME If you read this Thank you!!😊🤗

  4. 4 out of 5

    Corinne

    This is a beautiful collection of short stories. Although the stories are somewhat driven by fates, the protagonists are original in their actions, and the themes linger in mind long after I put them down. Tagore has great insight in human psyche and behavior

  5. 4 out of 5

    Rahul Matthew

    For those who like poetry and quotes, you cannot go wrong with one of India's most famous "the Bard of Bengal"-Rabindranath Tagore. Not much about him but he became the first Non-European to win the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1913 and wrote two nation's national anthems(India and Bangladesh). A few quotes from him: "Clouds come floating into my life, no longer to carry rain or usher storm, but to add color to my sunset sky." "I slept and dreamt that life was a joy. I awoke and saw that life was se For those who like poetry and quotes, you cannot go wrong with one of India's most famous "the Bard of Bengal"-Rabindranath Tagore. Not much about him but he became the first Non-European to win the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1913 and wrote two nation's national anthems(India and Bangladesh). A few quotes from him: "Clouds come floating into my life, no longer to carry rain or usher storm, but to add color to my sunset sky." "I slept and dreamt that life was a joy. I awoke and saw that life was service. I acted and behold, service was a joy." "You can't cross the sea merely by standing and staring at the water." "The butterfly counts not months but moments, and has time enough." "Death is not extinguishing the light; it is only putting out the lamp because the dawn has come." "Faith is the bird that feels the light when the dawn is still dark." "Let your life lightly dance on the edges of Time like dew on the tip of a leaf." "Every child comes with the message that God is not yet discouraged of man." "Don't limit a child to your own learning, for he was born in another time." "Trees are the earth's endless effort to speak to the listening heaven." Simple and short, such timeless meaning and a universal appeal to it!!!

  6. 4 out of 5

    J.G. Keely

    This collection has a very strong start: the first few stories are gems, just wonderfully-well crafted, evocative, sympathetic tales of life. There are humorous clever bits and heartbreaking bits, and it all has the ring of truth about it. I kept getting hints of this in The Home and The World, but Tagore couldn't seem to sustain it. Unfortunately, that proves to be true here, as well, as several of the stories don't quite come together, and get hung-up on clumsy construction. My previous complai This collection has a very strong start: the first few stories are gems, just wonderfully-well crafted, evocative, sympathetic tales of life. There are humorous clever bits and heartbreaking bits, and it all has the ring of truth about it. I kept getting hints of this in The Home and The World, but Tagore couldn't seem to sustain it. Unfortunately, that proves to be true here, as well, as several of the stories don't quite come together, and get hung-up on clumsy construction. My previous complaint with Tagore was about his habit of just telling us (or having the characters tell us) the subtext, instead of actually letting it play out in dialogue and action. The plot and actions of a character are not what give them personality--it's how they do things that makes them unique. After all, there are endless books that share roughly the same plot, for example the Hero's Journey story of a young, inexperienced man who goes out into the world and, with the help of his wise mentor, defeats a great threat and returns older and wiser. Some of these stories are dull and vapid, others are engrossing and fascinating--so it's not the mere litany of facts, but the way in which they are shown to us. Most stories have subtext: a meaning that's never quite stated outright, but which becomes obvious through the relationships as they are depicted. So, in one of Tagore's stories, we have a girl who can't speak, and the story is about the difficulty of her life. There's a great concept for a bit of subtext in the story, but the way Tagore delivered it was very disappointing. In the opening paragraphs, we are told: "her mother looked upon her as a deformity in herself." That would be a very poignant way of looking at the relationship--except that when the author just blandly states it instead of actually showing it in action, it loses a great deal of its strength. Then, Tagore ends the paragraph: "Her mother regarded her with aversion as a stain upon her own body." So, not only is the story's subtext just blandly laid out for the reader, it's done so twice in the same paragraph. This is the kind of sloppy execution that makes a lot of Tagore's writing disappointing, especially when other sections are crafted with so much more skill and care. It's certainly well worth reading for the number of excellent stories that it contains, but as a whole, it's uneven.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Anya (~on a semi-hiatus~)

    Watching tv during dinner is a family ritual in our house. I generally stay away from tv, but tv during dinner time is sacred to me. So these days, the 'rents and I have been watching Stories by Rabindranath Tagore and they are so lovely in their quaintness that it makes me weep. (I just had a good weepfest while watching Kabuliwaala) I have read a couple of these stories as a child but they were scattered over the years so I don't remember much. I grew up in West Bengal so I had become fluent i Watching tv during dinner is a family ritual in our house. I generally stay away from tv, but tv during dinner time is sacred to me. So these days, the 'rents and I have been watching Stories by Rabindranath Tagore and they are so lovely in their quaintness that it makes me weep. (I just had a good weepfest while watching Kabuliwaala) I have read a couple of these stories as a child but they were scattered over the years so I don't remember much. I grew up in West Bengal so I had become fluent in Bangla by the time we moved to Uttar Pradesh. But I don't remember a lick of it. I wish I could read the original text. :c

  8. 4 out of 5

    Chaitali Chakraborty

    I am a Bengali, and have read all these stories in Bengali language. When I read the same in English, I had a thought passing. There are some expressions that are innate and inherent to one specific language. No other language in the entire world can capture the exact emotion. I love his work.Although, I enjoyed reading the same in my language better, nevertheless a book that would open the ajar door of Bengali emotions completely. I guess my other Bengali friends would feel the same.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Sherry

    I just joined the Iconic India challenge in the History Group. And this is one I chose to read. One of India's greatest writers, he captures a feeling of the life of India in his stories. Much like Anton Chekhov does for Russia. He tells his stories without judgement. We are left to draw our own conclusions. Unlike the west, death in this framework is never the end to be avoided. There is a gentle fatalism that is not devoid of hope. People can change, sometimes they do and sometimes they don't I just joined the Iconic India challenge in the History Group. And this is one I chose to read. One of India's greatest writers, he captures a feeling of the life of India in his stories. Much like Anton Chekhov does for Russia. He tells his stories without judgement. We are left to draw our own conclusions. Unlike the west, death in this framework is never the end to be avoided. There is a gentle fatalism that is not devoid of hope. People can change, sometimes they do and sometimes they don't and whichever way it goes is just the way it goes. I loved the stories, they have a simple beauty, full of deep understanding of and compassion for the human condition.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Megha Chakraborty

    Thid book doesn't need any review. The story never gets old. So many emotions. Genius Genius man. Thid book doesn't need any review. The story never gets old. So many emotions. Genius Genius man.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Shikha

    Tagore has won my heart since childhood with his timeless short stories and poems. His stories do not follow any particular pattern or theme yet it is consistently mind pleasing. The vibrancy of themes and plots makes it so fresh to read each time. I am pretty sure I have read this book earlier in my childhood, yet I have the impulse to read it again every time I lay my hands on. The beauty also lies in the unexpected yet the simplest turn of plots in the stories. Tagore successfully expresses s Tagore has won my heart since childhood with his timeless short stories and poems. His stories do not follow any particular pattern or theme yet it is consistently mind pleasing. The vibrancy of themes and plots makes it so fresh to read each time. I am pretty sure I have read this book earlier in my childhood, yet I have the impulse to read it again every time I lay my hands on. The beauty also lies in the unexpected yet the simplest turn of plots in the stories. Tagore successfully expresses simple thing in the simplest manner possible. The simplicity and the commonness of the stories make it so gripping to read. There is no heavy truth, no harsh realities and no difficult lessons, just simple stories! And that's the beauty! A must read for teenagers and everyone elder to teenagers!

  12. 4 out of 5

    Muthu Anand

    One word -Ineffable.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Meghana

    Short stories are my least favourite genre of literature. That's because so few authors get it right. My favourites include R.K. Narayan, Saki, O'Henry, and Jhumpa Lahiri. After reading this book, I have no hesitation in adding Rabindranath Tagore to the list. I had read The Kabuliwalla nearly a decade ago, and it remains one of my favourite stories of all time. Like many others, I also enjoyed reading The Postmaster, but my personal favourite find was The Return Of The Child. Tagore has a gift f Short stories are my least favourite genre of literature. That's because so few authors get it right. My favourites include R.K. Narayan, Saki, O'Henry, and Jhumpa Lahiri. After reading this book, I have no hesitation in adding Rabindranath Tagore to the list. I had read The Kabuliwalla nearly a decade ago, and it remains one of my favourite stories of all time. Like many others, I also enjoyed reading The Postmaster, but my personal favourite find was The Return Of The Child. Tagore has a gift for sketching memorable, luminous characters using the limited medium of the short story, and this book is extremely gripping. However, the undertow of melancholy and death in this book is rather depressing.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Amitava Das

    First off - I can understand the indignation of the well - read Russian , French , or Italian people when we (not speaking their native tongue ) fail to sometimes appreciate the genuis of a Chekhov or a Flaubert or a Tomasi di Lampedusa, or when we fail to find those fine nuances in the screenplay of a Tarkovsky or a Renoir or a Rossellini classic. Because , sometimes , if not always , those fine details, that subtle twist in the word , sentence or colloquial form gets invariably lost in transla First off - I can understand the indignation of the well - read Russian , French , or Italian people when we (not speaking their native tongue ) fail to sometimes appreciate the genuis of a Chekhov or a Flaubert or a Tomasi di Lampedusa, or when we fail to find those fine nuances in the screenplay of a Tarkovsky or a Renoir or a Rossellini classic. Because , sometimes , if not always , those fine details, that subtle twist in the word , sentence or colloquial form gets invariably lost in translation. It is the worse for regional languages like Bengali , in which Tagore wrote , since there are simply no great translators around who could do a justice to these stories as Steegmuller did for Flaubert , or Mirra Ginsberg did for Bulgakov or recently , what Breon Mitchell has been doing for Kafka. It is this woeful state of translation that renders Tagore’s short stories , which I would place in an even higher pedestal than those by Chekhov - usually regarded as the greatest short story writer of all time by the Anglophone world - merely good , sometimes great , but not as examples of supreme artistic mastery of the short story form, which they really are. Tagore’s stories , in their experimentation with form and content , in their playfulness with all kinds of literary techniques , in their razor sharp portrayal of people and places and social milieu, in their devastating satire of traditional values , in their empathy for the most wretched of characters and situations , in their panoptical assessment of the human condition - are simply amongst the handful of literary creations that should be preserved for posterity in a special bunker immune to the ravages of time alongside Shakespeare’s first folio or Dante’s Divine Comedy.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Avinash

    Every story in this collection is beautiful and unique in its own way. They all carry a certain set of emotions along with some life lessons. I think they have done a perfect justice in depicting THE India of Tagore's era without any prejudice or manipulation. They give you the glimpse of the beauty this country had that time, but at the same time they also portray the flaw in it. As I said every story has something to offer but my favorites are "The Postmaster", "Kabuliwallah" and "Guest". In sho Every story in this collection is beautiful and unique in its own way. They all carry a certain set of emotions along with some life lessons. I think they have done a perfect justice in depicting THE India of Tagore's era without any prejudice or manipulation. They give you the glimpse of the beauty this country had that time, but at the same time they also portray the flaw in it. As I said every story has something to offer but my favorites are "The Postmaster", "Kabuliwallah" and "Guest". In short a book that everyone should read in my opinion, whether you are a big fan of short stories or not. Hopefully it will not disappoint you.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Nazish

    Just finished this beautiful, fresh, sensitive collection of short stories for which Tagore holds so much ground and rightly so. He talks about loving fathers, songs of nature, hardworking young men fighting the family honour and empty vaults with smile on their faces and poverty and humanity in the streets of Calcutta. Must read to get a brief glimpse of Tagore's literary world. Just finished this beautiful, fresh, sensitive collection of short stories for which Tagore holds so much ground and rightly so. He talks about loving fathers, songs of nature, hardworking young men fighting the family honour and empty vaults with smile on their faces and poverty and humanity in the streets of Calcutta. Must read to get a brief glimpse of Tagore's literary world.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Julia

    Amazing short stories which bridge time and space as only real classics can do. Subtle characterizations, painful insights and light irony - need to read more of this.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Hana

    I've been watching Anurag Basu's adaptation of Tagore's short stories on Netflix. The acting and cinematography are superb but after only one episode I'm feeling quite lost. As a traveler who loved the days before GPS and global homogenization I relish the feeling. Perhaps reading Tagore's stories will clue me in to the complex family history. I've been watching Anurag Basu's adaptation of Tagore's short stories on Netflix. The acting and cinematography are superb but after only one episode I'm feeling quite lost. As a traveler who loved the days before GPS and global homogenization I relish the feeling. Perhaps reading Tagore's stories will clue me in to the complex family history.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Laura Avellaneda-Cruz

    I highly recommend to anyone who has not yet read Tagore to read his short stories. I am not even sure that the one here is the same collection of short stories I read--I read the ones that he wrote in 1898 or so. They are way ahead of their time in some of the insights and ideas, and yet also so reflective of the time and place--a time and place where it's normal to marry your daughter off by 8 or 9, and she is quite old for marriage by her teenage years, a time when the British still had colon I highly recommend to anyone who has not yet read Tagore to read his short stories. I am not even sure that the one here is the same collection of short stories I read--I read the ones that he wrote in 1898 or so. They are way ahead of their time in some of the insights and ideas, and yet also so reflective of the time and place--a time and place where it's normal to marry your daughter off by 8 or 9, and she is quite old for marriage by her teenage years, a time when the British still had colonial power in India. I haven't read a lot of older fiction since I was a teen, so it is a treat to read Tagore, but he is so much more thoughtful than most of the older continental European authors I used to read. Tagore communicates culture, landscape, language to me--someone who has never been to Bengal, or India--very powerfully, and I can only presume accurately and with its complexity. Tagore writes from a man's perspective, for the most part, and lacks certain insight into women, and yet the last story in the collection, narrated by a woman, is incredibly powerful. And his stories that center around some way in which a woman is oppressed by her husband, etc. are very compelling, as are his depictions of power and subservience, money and exploitation, in-law relationships, and the land and the water. I kept wondering, as I read his stories, "Why had I not begun reading Tagore earlier?" That said, he also clearly belongs to the class (rich) and gender that he comes from, and there are, of course, limitations to the kinds of voices he can deeply convey. But he does seem to work with curiosity, insight and compassion to tell a rich variety of stories. You will be transported to Bengal in the late 19th century with little effort on your part. He wraps you in. I also really liked how short most of the stories are--good for bedtime.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Dipti

    The subtlety and simplicity with which Sir Tagore writes, compliments the old Indian times of Calcutta and places around it. Stories with lessons and hidden morals reminds me of English textbook stories which was worth looking forward to when a fresh new year began. The best part about Sir Tagore's stories are that they have a very mellow edge to the stories which reflect the hardships and struggles of a common man. Although written with respect to a society which dated back almost a century back The subtlety and simplicity with which Sir Tagore writes, compliments the old Indian times of Calcutta and places around it. Stories with lessons and hidden morals reminds me of English textbook stories which was worth looking forward to when a fresh new year began. The best part about Sir Tagore's stories are that they have a very mellow edge to the stories which reflect the hardships and struggles of a common man. Although written with respect to a society which dated back almost a century back the style in which the emotions are displayed can be related to even today. Not ending a story in a conventional 'happy ending' manner makes it stand out from the rest. It makes us roam around the fictional world of the story for sometime and hitting the harsh reality of the world at the end teaching us that in reality 'happiness' is just another emotion and not the sole emotion to be in perpetually and that human beings need to have the ability to deal with other emotions as strongly and adamantly as much as they treat happiness. The last story "The Son of Rashmani" moved me the most. I almost welled up a little at the end. I guess the best one was kept for the last. Apart from this it would be difficult to pick out the best ones but few I found really good were 'The Cabuliwallah', 'Subha'(for effectively portraying the hardships and emotions of dumb people ) and 'The Castaway' (The way he has justified the 'theft' filled with emotions is brilliant.)

  21. 5 out of 5

    Sally

    "Small lives, humble distress, Tales of humdrum grief and pain", November 23, 2014 This review is from: Selected Short Stories (Penguin Classics) (Paperback) Containing thirty very short stories, often only about six pages long, yet for all their brevity the author completely wraps you up in the world and the events. Set in and around the River Padma (near Calcutta) in the late 19th century, Tagore writes of the ordinary people: deaths and marriages, children, poverty, the rich, the mean, the ava "Small lives, humble distress, Tales of humdrum grief and pain", November 23, 2014 This review is from: Selected Short Stories (Penguin Classics) (Paperback) Containing thirty very short stories, often only about six pages long, yet for all their brevity the author completely wraps you up in the world and the events. Set in and around the River Padma (near Calcutta) in the late 19th century, Tagore writes of the ordinary people: deaths and marriages, children, poverty, the rich, the mean, the avaricious... Plus a couple with a ghostly touch. It's an era where women are definitely second-class-citizens; especially if they fall ill, when their husbands may well seek another wife; where the Hindus live alongside a Moslem population and the English governors....and where the river is a constant backdrop with its luxory houseboats and its monsoon flooding. The collection includes a poem, 'Passing Time in the Rain' (from which I have taken title of this review) and a selection of letters written by Tagore. Also a comprehensive glossary of Hindu terms encountered, a family-tree of family and map of Padma River area. Masterly storytelling, enhanced by a superb translation.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Gazala

    Though I am not too fond of Indian writers, the authors that wrote in earlier times had such a fine command over the language that a lot of new-gen Indian authors lack . Tagore happens to be one of those who never disappoints. With realistic portrayals and stories that touch one's hearts and move us in gentle ways , these short stories are no exception and provide to us reading material that targets the heart. While I've read some of these stories in school , it has been a pleasure to read them Though I am not too fond of Indian writers, the authors that wrote in earlier times had such a fine command over the language that a lot of new-gen Indian authors lack . Tagore happens to be one of those who never disappoints. With realistic portrayals and stories that touch one's hearts and move us in gentle ways , these short stories are no exception and provide to us reading material that targets the heart. While I've read some of these stories in school , it has been a pleasure to read them again - at a different age , with a different perspective which to me is the most beautiful thing about re-reading books...it shows us how much we have changed as we perceive it differently every single time. The stories are set in Bengal , and encompass varied raw human emotions. The highlight for me remains the fact that very few writers have some prowess where they deliver such powerful ideas - take one on a journey in such few words and still manage to arouse all the right emotions. Overall , this one makes to the favorites. More on www.merakipost.com soon. Happy reading.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Portia S

    I loved this collection. I was disappointed that it did not have as well "The Broken Nest", but these were fine all the same. Sigh, Tagore is depressing. In almost every single story, someone either died or ...died....and the sadness came through the opened floodgates. I think the only thing I've ever read from him that was hopeful or even cheerful would have been Gitanjali which I would listen to on headphones during the Great Panic Attacks of '09. In this collection, we learn of loving fathers I loved this collection. I was disappointed that it did not have as well "The Broken Nest", but these were fine all the same. Sigh, Tagore is depressing. In almost every single story, someone either died or ...died....and the sadness came through the opened floodgates. I think the only thing I've ever read from him that was hopeful or even cheerful would have been Gitanjali which I would listen to on headphones during the Great Panic Attacks of '09. In this collection, we learn of loving fathers, tyrannical mother in laws, hateful brother in laws and the like. I find it's interesting how women are portrayed in this collection, they are all insatiable beings who rule their husbands who argue and make unreasonable demands. I feel as though he's trying to be humourous, but it comes off so dry, but I like dry humour so it works for me :D Definitely a Good Read.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Mangesh Zope

    Amazing stories which will take you back to your childhood Touching stories from calcutta , almost felt like I am reading textbooks from school days. It's amazing how small stories like kabuliwalla and the last one could teach you lessons of life. Would love to read more work written by Ravindranath Tagore Amazing stories which will take you back to your childhood Touching stories from calcutta , almost felt like I am reading textbooks from school days. It's amazing how small stories like kabuliwalla and the last one could teach you lessons of life. Would love to read more work written by Ravindranath Tagore

  25. 5 out of 5

    Taungzilla Lao-aruen

    Touching with words and Tagore's narrative style. The writer had left a big room for us to think about the destiny of the characters in every chapters. Perhaps it's impossible for us, as the readers, to finish this book without the soliloquy about our real hard life. Touching with words and Tagore's narrative style. The writer had left a big room for us to think about the destiny of the characters in every chapters. Perhaps it's impossible for us, as the readers, to finish this book without the soliloquy about our real hard life.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Maria Z

    Brilliant. Makes you fall in love with literature again and again.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Dhara (dha.raiter)

    I've read Tagore's stories as a kid and was always touched by varying emotions that his characters and plot held. As an adult, his tone of writing has exceptionally awed me. His writing style can effortlessly strike a chord with you in a way that makes you long for the familiarity and nostalgia that is found in his works. All the short stories in this version have powerful themes and messages. None of stories' protagonist were bland. They were all emotional and psychologically multi layered, whi I've read Tagore's stories as a kid and was always touched by varying emotions that his characters and plot held. As an adult, his tone of writing has exceptionally awed me. His writing style can effortlessly strike a chord with you in a way that makes you long for the familiarity and nostalgia that is found in his works. All the short stories in this version have powerful themes and messages. None of stories' protagonist were bland. They were all emotional and psychologically multi layered, which shows Tagore's immense knowledge in human psyche. Among these stories, 'The Homecoming' will always remain closest to my heart. It's painful and heartbreaking, but it touches you like nothing else. Needless to say, English translation doesn't do much justice to his original works.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Paras Abbasi

    Rabindranath Tagore's short story collection was often loose ended and extremely brief, so much so that the collection can be done with in a few hours if you're a quick reader. What struck me most about the stories was his focus on poor-rich disparity in pre-partition Bengal while belonging to the upper class himself. His stories on thaylay walas and postmasters and women, subjects that were mostly ignored as members of the Indian society, not only provided a perspective to these otherwise invis Rabindranath Tagore's short story collection was often loose ended and extremely brief, so much so that the collection can be done with in a few hours if you're a quick reader. What struck me most about the stories was his focus on poor-rich disparity in pre-partition Bengal while belonging to the upper class himself. His stories on thaylay walas and postmasters and women, subjects that were mostly ignored as members of the Indian society, not only provided a perspective to these otherwise invisible people, but also aroused feelings of empathy and tenderness towards them. I'm definitely looking forward to reading more of Tagore.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Anushe Khan Pagnier

    3.5/5 I really enjoyed his style and was surprised by how modern his take was. His ability to describe Bengali life and cover the lives of several individuals, their beliefs and values, in that cultural climate in one sweep and without over sentimentality was great. Of course there were some stories I enjoyed more than others, also found it amusing that he too had his rendition of a ‘Freaky Friday’ story. The stories were well told, succinct, poetic yet dark, most ended with a hint of tragedy bu 3.5/5 I really enjoyed his style and was surprised by how modern his take was. His ability to describe Bengali life and cover the lives of several individuals, their beliefs and values, in that cultural climate in one sweep and without over sentimentality was great. Of course there were some stories I enjoyed more than others, also found it amusing that he too had his rendition of a ‘Freaky Friday’ story. The stories were well told, succinct, poetic yet dark, most ended with a hint of tragedy but super cool. I would definitely like to explore his writings more!

  30. 5 out of 5

    Rajat Gupta

    Simple stories about simple people and their day to day life. The narrative of stories is such that a reader will instantly connect with the stories. The emotions expressed by the characters of their love, fear, hate anger, jealousy related to people or things in their life is something which everyone could relate to. I particularly liked the stories 'Cabuliwala', 'Babus of Nayanjore' and 'the son of Rashmani'. Simple stories about simple people and their day to day life. The narrative of stories is such that a reader will instantly connect with the stories. The emotions expressed by the characters of their love, fear, hate anger, jealousy related to people or things in their life is something which everyone could relate to. I particularly liked the stories 'Cabuliwala', 'Babus of Nayanjore' and 'the son of Rashmani'.

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