hits counter Egon Schiele: Drawings and Watercolors - Ebook PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

Egon Schiele: Drawings and Watercolors

Availability: Ready to download

Schiele's oils have often been reproduced and are well recognized. However, limited access to the fragile works on paper and dispersion among several collections have made for an unbalanced representation of his work as a draftsman. This book assembles drawings and watercolors from public and private collections and reproduces work from every year of the artist's career, be Schiele's oils have often been reproduced and are well recognized. However, limited access to the fragile works on paper and dispersion among several collections have made for an unbalanced representation of his work as a draftsman. This book assembles drawings and watercolors from public and private collections and reproduces work from every year of the artist's career, beginning with the juvenilia and early academic studies. The focus means that work that is rarely reproduced is represented extensively, providing a unique opportunity to study the rapid artistic development of Schiele over the course of his brief twelve-year career. The book is organized chronologically and divided into year-by-year sections. Each section includes a text that discusses the major events in Schiele's life and the interrelation between the artist's drawing and developments in his oil painting. Features a previously unpublished Schiele watercolor and several works that have never been reproduced in color.


Compare

Schiele's oils have often been reproduced and are well recognized. However, limited access to the fragile works on paper and dispersion among several collections have made for an unbalanced representation of his work as a draftsman. This book assembles drawings and watercolors from public and private collections and reproduces work from every year of the artist's career, be Schiele's oils have often been reproduced and are well recognized. However, limited access to the fragile works on paper and dispersion among several collections have made for an unbalanced representation of his work as a draftsman. This book assembles drawings and watercolors from public and private collections and reproduces work from every year of the artist's career, beginning with the juvenilia and early academic studies. The focus means that work that is rarely reproduced is represented extensively, providing a unique opportunity to study the rapid artistic development of Schiele over the course of his brief twelve-year career. The book is organized chronologically and divided into year-by-year sections. Each section includes a text that discusses the major events in Schiele's life and the interrelation between the artist's drawing and developments in his oil painting. Features a previously unpublished Schiele watercolor and several works that have never been reproduced in color.

30 review for Egon Schiele: Drawings and Watercolors

  1. 4 out of 5

    Tim Pendry

    This is a review of Egon Schiele's drawings and watercolours, perhaps around 10% of his 3,000 works, but not of his oil paintings which need to be explored elsewhere. Jane Kallir, who appears to have dedicated her scholarly life to understanding and interpreting Schiele, provides a succinct and coherent psychological biography, tracing his short life year by year. The production values (Thames & Hudson but owing a great deal to the editing of Ian Vartanian of Goliga Books in Japan) are superb with This is a review of Egon Schiele's drawings and watercolours, perhaps around 10% of his 3,000 works, but not of his oil paintings which need to be explored elsewhere. Jane Kallir, who appears to have dedicated her scholarly life to understanding and interpreting Schiele, provides a succinct and coherent psychological biography, tracing his short life year by year. The production values (Thames & Hudson but owing a great deal to the editing of Ian Vartanian of Goliga Books in Japan) are superb with full page illustrations of the works to a very high standard. There is not much to add other than that I am persuaded by Kallir's thesis that Schiele's power to move lies in his ability to express individual maturation from adolescence to adulthood. There is, of course, the strong sexual element to his drawings but it should not be studied to the exclusion of what became his true area of genius - the portrait. What Schiele does is rescue humanity from the false dichotomy between the erotic and the pornographic in his art while clearly struggling to come to terms with and eventually submit to social expectations. This is why the life story is usefully read alongside the more intimate drawings and watercolours, away from grand and pompous allegories and market-driven portraiture great though these may be. The works are an essay in strategies of love and objectification in dealing with the power of the sexual. They will last so long as men and women are free to choose what they can see in order to effect personal transformation and so long as new individuals emerge to deal with sex and society. It is a male perspective but, as Ms. Kallir points out, it comes to a view of women as persons in his final years (1917/1918). We can only guess where he might have headed if he had survived the Flu at 28.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Ashley Tanasiychuk

    Author Jane Kallir founded the Galerie St. Etienne in 1939 in New York. A gallery of the same name, started in Vienna by her Austrian grandfather, closed due to the Nazi invasion, his family escaped to the US. Both galleries focus(ed) on Austrian and German Expressionism. Undoubtedly, Kallir is THE qualified expert to examine the too-short life of Austrian illustrator and painter, Egon Schiele. And she does a beautiful job of it. This stunning book is everything a visual art lover wants. Jam packed Author Jane Kallir founded the Galerie St. Etienne in 1939 in New York. A gallery of the same name, started in Vienna by her Austrian grandfather, closed due to the Nazi invasion, his family escaped to the US. Both galleries focus(ed) on Austrian and German Expressionism. Undoubtedly, Kallir is THE qualified expert to examine the too-short life of Austrian illustrator and painter, Egon Schiele. And she does a beautiful job of it. This stunning book is everything a visual art lover wants. Jam packed with high quality, full color reproductions of Schiele's work (there isn't a single black & white piece, which you find too often in art history books, don't you?): Over 300 color pieces in an under 500 page book. A surprise that continues to win me over: the physical size of this book. The dimensions of a typical hardcover novel, this volume (though thick and heavy) is portable, unlike most coffee table-sized art books. More art books should consider this size, paper quality, 100% full colour reproductions, and proportionately more art than text. My only complaint, publishing-wise? The type face is much too small for relaxed reading. Back to the content: Written quite methodically and skirting accusations that Schiele had an inappropriate interest in children, was loose with women, and was a whiny self entitled boy who expected the world to crawl over itself to be his patron, Kallir wants Schiele to be adored. As stated in the table of contents, this is a "biographical and stylistic study." Note: not a critical study. Each written section, organized mainly by year (this is a strictly chronological book, no jumping back and forth in time), is never more than 6 or 7 pages. Kallir provides only the most important bits of info from Schiele's life, whether he's studying and dropping out of school, struggling to find models or make money, working for the army or getting married, the author lets the art take the reader's attention. And there's so much to take in: Schiele was always creating, even in his rare quiet year. His work is impossible to resist. Page after page, even pieces that seem unfinished are great studies in the creator's process. So obviously skilled at rendering hands, why did Schiele so often leave them out? The only possible answer is one that should reassure artists around the world: drawing hands is really f**king difficult!!! The art: His 1907 (age 17!) charcoal portraits, while not stylistically unique, are absolutely stunning realistic portrayals of the human face and form. His 1909 oil painting, Portrait of the Painter Anton Peschka, stylistically borrows heavily from Klimt, but is so wonderfully executed, it stands (sits?) confidently on its own. Portrait of a Woman with Black Hat, also oil, also 1909, demonstrates the fabric of Klimt but a cloud-like treatment of hair - and those hands, those fingers! - that are something I would've loved to seen Schiele explore more. In 1910, the confidence grows, resulting in beautiful pieces like Frou Dr. Horwitz with Large Hat, and Standing Girl in Plaid Garment. He goes through a period in 1914 when he paints people with button-like lifeless eyes. He even does it to himself in Self-Portrait in Jerkin with Right Elbow Raised. This apparent personal detachment or lack of respect changes by 1918. Something wonderful is happening in crayon portraits like Seated Woman. She faces us, pearl necklace and blouse, looking like she's in the 21st century. Although not obviously Schiele, there's an unexpected warmth in the whole drawing but especially her face that would've been nice to see more of had Schiele not died that year of the Spanish Flu. Also The Artist's Mother (Marie Schiele), also 1918, contains the same warmth as Seated Woman, with perhaps a bit more expressionism that we associate with Schiele. Kallir closes the final chapter by saying that despite Schiele's death at age 28, "the artist's quest (was) successful, his mission fulfilled." I disagree. While he definitely did not waste a moment in creating work, and his talent was beyond his years, he definitely had much much more art to make, was capable of so much more, there were hints of styles and techniques that would have been wonderful to see him progress within. One of the most encouraging statements I've ever heard regarding the human fear of aging is that artists create their best work when they're older, that life experience coupled with technical mastery can result in work never possible in younger years. A shame we'll never know what the elder Schiele may have made. But of that he did, this book couldn't be a more beautifully comprehensive and respectful catalogue.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Dan

    Very fascinating book, beautifully produced.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Michael

    170316: i do not know if it was one of his works in Drawing classes at u that showed me i did not express myself best in visual art- but this excellent chronological text with reproductions certainly reminds me. now, decades later, i can philosophically think more of his work, but even so... would i ever be able to catch that swift, perfect line?... well i can look at his work... (only failing is the critical/biographical text is printed very small)...

  5. 5 out of 5

    Robert

    This book takes a simple approach. The editor links external events in the life of Egon Schiele to the subtle progression of his style through copious reproductions. Each chapter chronicles a year of the artist's short artistic life, starting with a summery and followed by page after page of meticulously organized watercolors and drawings. Complete with triumph, defeat and a coming of age, the book reads almost as well as an experimental novel as an artist monograph. This book takes a simple approach. The editor links external events in the life of Egon Schiele to the subtle progression of his style through copious reproductions. Each chapter chronicles a year of the artist's short artistic life, starting with a summery and followed by page after page of meticulously organized watercolors and drawings. Complete with triumph, defeat and a coming of age, the book reads almost as well as an experimental novel as an artist monograph.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Lita

    I like how this book is arranged chronologically, with essays about each body of work, and it's a small, thick, hardcover paperback, so it is an artbook you can read in bed without being in danger of it falling on your face like a huge block. Good reproductions and tons of his work represented. Nice quality book. I like how this book is arranged chronologically, with essays about each body of work, and it's a small, thick, hardcover paperback, so it is an artbook you can read in bed without being in danger of it falling on your face like a huge block. Good reproductions and tons of his work represented. Nice quality book.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Jesse

    My more exhaustive overview of Schiele's work (the title is a bit deceptive: a number of oil paintings are included as well), with countless full-color reproductions and brief biographical essays meant to provide a loose chronological context. But I read it less than I pore over the work itself. My more exhaustive overview of Schiele's work (the title is a bit deceptive: a number of oil paintings are included as well), with countless full-color reproductions and brief biographical essays meant to provide a loose chronological context. But I read it less than I pore over the work itself.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Frank McAdam

    Egon Schiele, in my opinion at least, was the greatest German artist of the twentieth century. Though he might have begun his career as a protégé of Gustav Klimt, he eventually moved past his mentor to become the preeminent practitioner of early twentieth century Austrian Expressionism. If today his accomplishments are not so well recognized as those of other European artists such as Picasso and Matisse, it is only partly due to Schiele's untimely death at age 28. More to blame is the success th Egon Schiele, in my opinion at least, was the greatest German artist of the twentieth century. Though he might have begun his career as a protégé of Gustav Klimt, he eventually moved past his mentor to become the preeminent practitioner of early twentieth century Austrian Expressionism. If today his accomplishments are not so well recognized as those of other European artists such as Picasso and Matisse, it is only partly due to Schiele's untimely death at age 28. More to blame is the success the Nazis achieved in suppressing all forms of modern German art during their time in power. As the 2004 Neue Galerie publication Arcadia and Metropolis makes clear, there was far more to the Nazis' war against entartete kunst than staging the infamous 1937 exhibit in Munich. The looting of masterpieces from Jewish victims throughout the 1930's and 40's has been well publicized; less well known is that established museums such as the Nationalgalerie Berlin were also routinely ransacked and their collections dispersed and in some instances destroyed outright. The terrible truth is that the Nazis dealt modern German art a blow from which, even today, it has not fully recovered. That so many of Schiele's works have survived is surprising in itself. Schiele was a genuine prodigy. His artistic talent was readily discernible even when he was still a small child even if it was not fully encouraged by his middle class family. He himself was well aware of his genius, and this self knowledge often rendered him insufferable to those who knew him best. It led him to place unrealistic demands on both friends and patrons and to remain childishly spoiled well into his mid-20's. Often in the early part of his career he used his great talent to shock unwary viewers as he rebelled against the staid traditions of proper Viennese society, an unfortunate tendency that hindered his commercial success. Behind the posturing, however, Schiele was a dedicated artist who was constantly striving to improve his skills. The rapidity with which his style evolved was astonishing. Egon Schiele: Drawings and Watercolors is necessarily limited in its approach to Schiele's art as it deals only with his works on paper. It is, however, quite thorough in cataloging these works and contains over 350 color illustrations, all of them of the highest quality. Moreover, its year-by-year chronological approach provides the reader with a guide to the evolution of Schiele's style from one year to the next and even sometimes from one month to the next. The progression is nothing short of amazing. The works themselves are almost entirely figurative, including a huge number of self-portraits as well as a great many nudes. Though many of the early nudes are shocking, the work of a young man clearly obsessed with sex, the later nudes reveal an unexpected sensitivity on the part of the artist and some are as revealing of character as any portrait while others are utterly detached in their depiction of the female form. Each chapter, or year, is preceded by a short essay by Jane Kallir, a renowned Schiele scholar (she is the author of the catalogue raisonné of Schiele’s work) as well as an excellent writer. She often has excellent insights into the artist's style, as when she writes (on page 73): "However, while Schiele's rendering of the figure was more or less naturalistic, his colors were decidedly not: they were bright, gaudy, and almost totally unresponsive to the demands of three-dimensional modeling. By substituting emotional effect for decorative effect in his use of color, Schiele achieved a synthesis between form and content that had eluded Klimt." This book is intended for those who already possess some knowledge of Schiele's art and biography. Those seeking a more general introduction to the artist would do better with Egon Schiele: Life and Work (Abrams, 2003), also by Jane Kallir.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Iain Lennon

    Innevitably a little bit difficult to separate a review of the book from the gorgeous drawings and paintings themselves. A slightly larger version would be lovely, and the type size of the text is small enough that it's a bugger to read it, but heck - it's a portfolio of beautiful pictures. Innevitably a little bit difficult to separate a review of the book from the gorgeous drawings and paintings themselves. A slightly larger version would be lovely, and the type size of the text is small enough that it's a bugger to read it, but heck - it's a portfolio of beautiful pictures.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Wing

    I think the monograph made a strong start, but it started to wane like an engine losing steam as the chronology went on. The pacing of the artwork really annoyed me—they seemed to just fill vacant pages like a photo album (almost as if she wanted to please collectors by featuring the pieces they owned: she is also a gallerist). Jane Kallir is no doubt an authority on Schiele. Throughout the book, she occasionally gives insight on what is prominently believed, and contrasts it with a telling tidb I think the monograph made a strong start, but it started to wane like an engine losing steam as the chronology went on. The pacing of the artwork really annoyed me—they seemed to just fill vacant pages like a photo album (almost as if she wanted to please collectors by featuring the pieces they owned: she is also a gallerist). Jane Kallir is no doubt an authority on Schiele. Throughout the book, she occasionally gives insight on what is prominently believed, and contrasts it with a telling tidbit of Schiele's personal history. At the heart of the book is Kallir's explanation of the role that the drawings and the paintings played in Schiele's oeurve—and this is the one thing that I take away from her book—the drawings ask questions, and the paintings, however much successfully, try to answer them. I think this is probably the most relevant point she makes in connection to the title of the book: Why not select a more appropriate title, such as "Schiele: A Chronology"? The story of Egon Schiele is as much a P.R. story spun by clever Europeans as is Jesus Christ and the Bible. I think Kallir helps demystify Schiele, if that was ever her intention. Let the art do the talking! However, I do agree when Frank Whitford says that Schiele is an artist where interpretation is indeed helpful. But maybe some CRITICAL interpretation would be helpful instead of a rehash of Schiele's personal history.

  11. 5 out of 5

    R Strange

    I didn't read all of the accompanying text, but it is thorough enough to return to for years. Densely packed with a chronology of almost purely figurative works on paper, great to show anyone who admits hands and feet are tough, that if you give it ten years even Schiele can get the bone length right. A beautiful document of skill development. The digest size is nice to hold. I didn't read all of the accompanying text, but it is thorough enough to return to for years. Densely packed with a chronology of almost purely figurative works on paper, great to show anyone who admits hands and feet are tough, that if you give it ten years even Schiele can get the bone length right. A beautiful document of skill development. The digest size is nice to hold.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Todd

    I know this book is not for everyone, but i totally love egon schiele's loose narrative nature in painting. He describes a lot with his linework(unusual in painting-sort of frowned upon), but it is more graphic that way...and possibly harsh. His patterns and layout is expressive, much like his teacher Klimt, but totally of his own merit. I know this book is not for everyone, but i totally love egon schiele's loose narrative nature in painting. He describes a lot with his linework(unusual in painting-sort of frowned upon), but it is more graphic that way...and possibly harsh. His patterns and layout is expressive, much like his teacher Klimt, but totally of his own merit.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Tony

    Beautiful book. Clear, lucid writing.

  14. 5 out of 5

    E7boehm

    Exceptional art book...

  15. 4 out of 5

    Petabyte

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Saw and scanned this at the shop yesterday. It's positively pornographic! Is that a bad thing? You decide. Oh, but the pages are breathtaking. Might have to go back and get a copy, after all. Saw and scanned this at the shop yesterday. It's positively pornographic! Is that a bad thing? You decide. Oh, but the pages are breathtaking. Might have to go back and get a copy, after all.

  16. 4 out of 5

    melissa bock

    a beautiful coffee table book purchased for me by my love.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Bruno Dal Molin

    Very nice book. Includes artwork from his early days to the last. The text is ok, informative.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Lala

  19. 4 out of 5

    Sami

  20. 5 out of 5

    Nicholas

  21. 4 out of 5

    Lesiba

  22. 4 out of 5

    Andrey Shcherbinin

  23. 4 out of 5

    Nachiket Baviskar

  24. 5 out of 5

    Ann

  25. 5 out of 5

    Paula

  26. 4 out of 5

    Dragan Petrovic

  27. 4 out of 5

    Kathie

  28. 5 out of 5

    Nurdin Surahman

  29. 5 out of 5

    Sarah

  30. 4 out of 5

    Jolee

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...