hits counter Young Men in Spats - Ebook PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

Young Men in Spats

Availability: Ready to download

These eleven stories describe the misadventures of the delightfully idle "Eggs," "Beans," and "Crumpets" that populate the Drones club: young men wearing spats, starting spats, and landing in sticky spots. For the first of his many appearances in the Wodehouse canon, Uncle Fred comes to what he believes to be the rescue. These eleven stories describe the misadventures of the delightfully idle "Eggs," "Beans," and "Crumpets" that populate the Drones club: young men wearing spats, starting spats, and landing in sticky spots. For the first of his many appearances in the Wodehouse canon, Uncle Fred comes to what he believes to be the rescue.


Compare

These eleven stories describe the misadventures of the delightfully idle "Eggs," "Beans," and "Crumpets" that populate the Drones club: young men wearing spats, starting spats, and landing in sticky spots. For the first of his many appearances in the Wodehouse canon, Uncle Fred comes to what he believes to be the rescue. These eleven stories describe the misadventures of the delightfully idle "Eggs," "Beans," and "Crumpets" that populate the Drones club: young men wearing spats, starting spats, and landing in sticky spots. For the first of his many appearances in the Wodehouse canon, Uncle Fred comes to what he believes to be the rescue.

30 review for Young Men in Spats

  1. 4 out of 5

    Pramod Nair

    Reading Wodehouse is always a perfect antidote for depression, stress and boredom, as the wonderful world that the author creates in his stories through charming narrations involving loveable characters and hilarious happenings always acts as a magical restorative to the frayed nerves. Nothing disastrous or bad happens in the landscape of Wodehouse narratives and they always fill the reader with a healthy dose of cheerfulness. Young Men in Spats can be seen as a fine example for this timeless co Reading Wodehouse is always a perfect antidote for depression, stress and boredom, as the wonderful world that the author creates in his stories through charming narrations involving loveable characters and hilarious happenings always acts as a magical restorative to the frayed nerves. Nothing disastrous or bad happens in the landscape of Wodehouse narratives and they always fill the reader with a healthy dose of cheerfulness. Young Men in Spats can be seen as a fine example for this timeless comedy and the clean yet delightful humor that where a feature of P.G. Wodehouse stories. Originally published in 1936, this compilation of eleven short stories is loaded with enough wit and signature Wodehouse style of narration, which will engulf the reader in a blanket of cozy comfort. This collection, which contains eight Eggs, Beans And Crumpets tales featuring the members of the Drones club and three Angler’s Rest stories featuring Mr. Mulliner has some of the most hilarious & recognizable characters created by Wodehouse – other than Bertie Wooster and Jeeves – making their appearance. One of my favorite Wodehouse characters, Uncle Fred along with his nephew Pongo Twistleton makes their debut in one of the short stories featuring the Drones club in this anthology. The short stories in this anthology present sidesplitting accounts of upper-class characters getting muddled in preposterous situations often involving monetary issues, pursuit of love, eccentric uncles and unsentimental aunts. Like other Wodehouse tales these tales brim with excellent usage of verbal humor, engaging metaphors, fascinating descriptions of the characters and ridiculously funny situations which will leave the reader laughing in a blissful state of mind. Tales like ‘The Amazing Hat Mystery’, ‘Goodbye to all cats’, ‘Uncle Fred Flits By’ and ‘Archibald and the masses’ can be regarded as some of the very best short stories ever written by Wodehouse. If you are looking for a book that is meant for light-hearted reading with a heavy dose of humor then Young Men in Spats will not disappoint you.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Nandakishore Varma

    This book contains avowedly some of the funniest Wodehouse stories about... well, young men in spats. Of these, three stories of Freddie Widgeon (who loves and losses girls at regular intervals), two stories about Archibald Mulliner (yet another of Mr. Mulliner's nephews) and the lone story about Pongo Twistleton's eccentric uncle Fred - Lord Ickenham - are absolute gems. They still double me up. The stories are: 1. Fate - Freddie Widgeon learns the hard way that helping females in distress is no This book contains avowedly some of the funniest Wodehouse stories about... well, young men in spats. Of these, three stories of Freddie Widgeon (who loves and losses girls at regular intervals), two stories about Archibald Mulliner (yet another of Mr. Mulliner's nephews) and the lone story about Pongo Twistleton's eccentric uncle Fred - Lord Ickenham - are absolute gems. They still double me up. The stories are: 1. Fate - Freddie Widgeon learns the hard way that helping females in distress is not a fit occupation for affianced young men in America, because "sugar daddies" are always being discovered in "love nests" there. 2. Tried in the Furnace - Barmy Fotheringay-Phipps and Pongo Twistleton run after the same girl, thus trying their friendship in the furnace - so to speak. 3. Trouble Down at Tudsleigh - Freddie Widgeon learns that Tennyson is not a very safe device to woo a girl, when her impressionable younger sister is listening. 4. The Amazing Hat Mystery - A plain mix-up or something to do with the fourth dimension? You decide. 5. Goodbye to All Cats - This is the most hilarious Widgeon story ever. He losses his girl (of course!) after paying a visit to her pet-infested home. 6. The Luck of the Stiffhams - Young Stiffham proves that luck is the most important thing in life - after some hair-raising adventures, of course. 7. Noblesse Oblige - Freddie Widgeon learns that being loyal to one's high-school code does not always bode well for romance. 8. Uncle Fred Flits By - In one of his "instructive" afternoons, Lord Ickenham makes life hell for his nephew Pongo but hilarious for the rest of us. His impersonations of various persona in this story is mind-boggling. 9. Archibald and the Masses - Mulliner's nephew becomes a communist through the influence of his valet, but finds it rather hard going for a pampered young man of the idle rich class. 10. The Code of the Mulliners - Archibald thinks there may be madness in his family, and wants to get his fiance break off his engagement. Easier said than done! 11. The Fiery Wooing of Mordred - Mulliner's nephew, Mordred the poet, literally sets things on fire - a talent much sought by the dad of his lady love, an impoverished aristocrat. A hilarious comedy and also a biting satire on post-war British gentry.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Trevor

    Perhaps you have been wondering if you should risk it and read some Wodehouse, but are afraid to start just in case you find that this is some sort of proof of what you have long suspected - that Trevor McCandless has no sense of humour and his advice is not worth a pinch of salt. Well, all I can say is get your hands on this book and read just one story - Good-bye to All Cats. If you don't find this story amusing (well, actually, hilarious) we can have nothing further to say to one another. I k Perhaps you have been wondering if you should risk it and read some Wodehouse, but are afraid to start just in case you find that this is some sort of proof of what you have long suspected - that Trevor McCandless has no sense of humour and his advice is not worth a pinch of salt. Well, all I can say is get your hands on this book and read just one story - Good-bye to All Cats. If you don't find this story amusing (well, actually, hilarious) we can have nothing further to say to one another. I know, that seems harsh - but it is the way life is, I'm afraid. If four and a half billion years of evolution has left you without a sense of humour then there is nothing for it. It was obvious I was going to love this story from the off. The early paragraphs in which he establishes that the two young people are in love is remarkable in its simplicity and had me in stitches when they started shoving each other. The cats and the father and how these two come together - honestly. I really loved the father asking his daughter - supposedly under his breath, but actually loud enough to be heard in Canada, "Who's the half-wit?" About her new boyfriend at the dinner table - I'm taking notes for when the daughters begin bringing around young gentlemen to my place. But the line about the dog making a sotto voce impersonation of distant thunder ... If this was the only funny story in the book it would justify the reading. But there's more, so much more - and all nearly as good - though, obviously, not quite. After all, we are talking about near perfection here. Glorious stuff.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Jason Koivu

    Oh I say! Yes, jolly good, this! *nonsensical ejaculation!-cough-mutter* Another rollicking good time with the, ah, inane rich gentlemen of yesteryear - capital chaps! *throat-clearing tick* as, ah, as penned by the prolific P.G. Wodehouse...Sir Pelham Grenville, "Plum" as we called him back in good old Dulwich. Marvelous school that. He made out well there, if I recall...a First XI cricketer, I think. *wanders off in cloudy musings* Wodehouse...Wodehouse...Respectable Norfolk family, the Wodeho Oh I say! Yes, jolly good, this! *nonsensical ejaculation!-cough-mutter* Another rollicking good time with the, ah, inane rich gentlemen of yesteryear - capital chaps! *throat-clearing tick* as, ah, as penned by the prolific P.G. Wodehouse...Sir Pelham Grenville, "Plum" as we called him back in good old Dulwich. Marvelous school that. He made out well there, if I recall...a First XI cricketer, I think. *wanders off in cloudy musings* Wodehouse...Wodehouse...Respectable Norfolk family, the Wodehouses, what? And what a smashing good writer the old bean turned out to be! Some say this, this, what's it...Young Men in Spats isn't as memorable as his Jeeves and Wooster stuff. Well, *huff!* I have nothing to say to that, but *huff! huff!* but that it's a bunch of hogwash and claptrap! No, no. Bunch of nonsense. Why, I chortled and snorted my way through from start to finish!

  5. 5 out of 5

    Em*bedded-in-books*

    I adore PG Wodehouse, and have been reading and rereading his books at intervals since my early teens. Took up this book with great hopes, but somehow this collection of short stories fell. short somewhere. The overall theme was same...young men trying to win their sweethearts by hook or by crook, often with hilarious results. The vintage Wodehouse humor was there , but this time round I wasn't much affected. it was just above average sort of book, though a couple of stories were really interest I adore PG Wodehouse, and have been reading and rereading his books at intervals since my early teens. Took up this book with great hopes, but somehow this collection of short stories fell. short somewhere. The overall theme was same...young men trying to win their sweethearts by hook or by crook, often with hilarious results. The vintage Wodehouse humor was there , but this time round I wasn't much affected. it was just above average sort of book, though a couple of stories were really interesting. I always prefer his novels to anthologies, Jeeves and Uncle Fred series being my favorites.

  6. 4 out of 5

    John

    Eleven amusing stories set around members of the Drones club. All of them bring a smile to the face. Misunderstandings abound with resolutions in the end. Freddie Widegon, Pongo, several Mullner’s and an appearance by Uncle Fred all create hilarious situations. The amazing hat mystery, Archibald and Aurelia’s on again off again relationship, a traumatic visit by Uncle Fred to Pongo and a visit to the suburbs all weave a hilarious tapestry of hilarity.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Leslie

    This collection of short stories, marvellously narrated by Jonathan Cecil, is told by and to various Eggs, Beans and Crumpets who belong to the Drones Club, relating gossip of the recent activities of some of their fellow club members. My favorites were "The Amazing Hat Mystery" and "Uncle Fred Flits By" but all the stories were great fun. Contents: "Fate" (Drone Freddie Widgeon) "Tried in the Furnace" (Drones Barmy Fotheringay-Phipps and Pongo Twistleton) "Trouble Down at Tudsleigh" (Drone Freddie This collection of short stories, marvellously narrated by Jonathan Cecil, is told by and to various Eggs, Beans and Crumpets who belong to the Drones Club, relating gossip of the recent activities of some of their fellow club members. My favorites were "The Amazing Hat Mystery" and "Uncle Fred Flits By" but all the stories were great fun. Contents: "Fate" (Drone Freddie Widgeon) "Tried in the Furnace" (Drones Barmy Fotheringay-Phipps and Pongo Twistleton) "Trouble Down at Tudsleigh" (Drone Freddie Widgeon) "The Amazing Hat Mystery" (Drones Percy Wimbolt and Nelson Cork) "Goodbye to All Cats" (Drone Freddie Widgeon) "The Luck of the Stiffhams" (Drone Stiffy Stiffham) "Noblesse Oblige" (Drone Freddie Widgeon) "Uncle Fred Flits By" (Drone Pongo Twistleton, Uncle Fred) "Archibald and the Masses" (Drone Archibald Mulliner, told by Mr Mulliner) "The Code of the Mulliners" (Drone Archibald Mulliner, told by Mr Mulliner) "The Fiery Wooing of Mordred" (non-Drone story told by Mr Mulliner)

  8. 4 out of 5

    Steven

    "It began to seem to Pongo that with any luck he might be able to keep the old blister pottering harmlessly about here till nightfall, when he could shoot a bit of dinner into him and put him to bed. And as Lord Ickenham had specifically stated that his wife, Pongo's Aunt Jane, had expressed her intention of scalping him with a blunt knife if he wasn't back at the Hall by lunchtime on the morrow, it really looked as if he might get through this visit without perpetrating a single major outrage o "It began to seem to Pongo that with any luck he might be able to keep the old blister pottering harmlessly about here till nightfall, when he could shoot a bit of dinner into him and put him to bed. And as Lord Ickenham had specifically stated that his wife, Pongo's Aunt Jane, had expressed her intention of scalping him with a blunt knife if he wasn't back at the Hall by lunchtime on the morrow, it really looked as if he might get through this visit without perpetrating a single major outrage on the public weal. It is rather interesting to note that as he thought this Pongo smiled, because it was the last time he smiled that day." (174)This collection of relatively early stories centers on various members of the Drones Club, as they recount tales of their own and others' shenanigans and misfortunes. Of note is that Uncle Fred makes his appearance here for the first time. I didn't love all of the stories, but most of them were entertaining enough and a couple of them quite good, particularly Uncle Fred Flits By, from which I quote above.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Tanmay Jadhav

    What a splendid read to get back into the habit of reading. Probably the best author to ever put words to paper. Even though it’s a compilation of short stories of 2 young men inter spread through London and the book alike, the conversation like flow to the stories is the crux of Wodehouse’s storytelling. Not as non cerebral as one might think but quite successful in engender a chuckle whilst you read this on your daily commute or the local library as I did. Additionally, I was also reminded of What a splendid read to get back into the habit of reading. Probably the best author to ever put words to paper. Even though it’s a compilation of short stories of 2 young men inter spread through London and the book alike, the conversation like flow to the stories is the crux of Wodehouse’s storytelling. Not as non cerebral as one might think but quite successful in engender a chuckle whilst you read this on your daily commute or the local library as I did. Additionally, I was also reminded of how great it feels to hold a book in your hand instead of an iPad which although has it’s advantages but has nothing on paper when it comes to eliciting nostalgia and the ‘experience’ of reading a book.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Madhulika Liddle

    Percy continued to stare before him like a man who has drained the wine-cup of life to its lees, only to discover a dead mouse at the bottom. I began reading this book after attempts to read three other books—Breakfast at Tiffany’s, The Leopard and Keep the Aspidistra Flying—all failed within a couple of paragraphs of starting. By the time I’d set down the third book, I knew nothing but Wodehouse would serve. I needed something that didn’t wear me down, something light and entertaining. Something Percy continued to stare before him like a man who has drained the wine-cup of life to its lees, only to discover a dead mouse at the bottom. I began reading this book after attempts to read three other books—Breakfast at Tiffany’s, The Leopard and Keep the Aspidistra Flying—all failed within a couple of paragraphs of starting. By the time I’d set down the third book, I knew nothing but Wodehouse would serve. I needed something that didn’t wear me down, something light and entertaining. Something like Buck-u-Uppo. Wodehouse, of course. This collection consists of short stories featuring—as its title suggests—various young men, most of them members of the Drones (though there are a few stories, the ones at the end of the book, which feature Mr Mulliner’s nephews). All of the ‘young men in spats’, with one exception, are also young men in love: nearly all have their stories centered round girls they’ve fallen in love with. There are unattainable girls, girls who’ve said yes but who are in danger of being lost, and girls to be wooed. There are rivals, there are frightening relatives, and other obstacles in the path of true love. And, in inimitable Wodehouse style, the situations are fun, but the icing on the cake is the writing, so brilliantly witty and intelligent that you can’t help but admire the genius of this man. (The exception to the ‘young men in love’ motif is Pongo Twistleton, who appears in the unforgettably hilarious Uncle Fred Flits By, one of my favourite Wodehouse short stories. Though Pongo does feel a sweeping infatuation for the pretty girl he encounters in the house where he poses briefly as assistant to vet, nephew, and then again vet, the story isn’t about the one-sided love of Pongo at all). I couldn’t recommend this more.

  11. 4 out of 5

    J.G. Keely

    It took a bit of time, at least from this particular volume, to recognize the reasons for Wodehouse's pre-eminance as British Humorist. I still did not find that those reasons were able to upturn Adams or Pope, but Wodehouse has a wit and verve which cannot be denied. What I expected (and eventually got) was a bit of mastery of the art of the ridiculous situation, where the escalation of events and unlikely (but usually, rationally-following) coincidences provides an equal escalation of hilarity. It took a bit of time, at least from this particular volume, to recognize the reasons for Wodehouse's pre-eminance as British Humorist. I still did not find that those reasons were able to upturn Adams or Pope, but Wodehouse has a wit and verve which cannot be denied. What I expected (and eventually got) was a bit of mastery of the art of the ridiculous situation, where the escalation of events and unlikely (but usually, rationally-following) coincidences provides an equal escalation of hilarity. Wodehouse's wordplay is strong, but it is likely that my estimation of him fell in that it was not as strong as the aforementioned authors. I find that the greatest wit and humor comes with that one must work for; a sense that you have shared something with the author: bridged time and space and come to a coy little understanding. For me, the sense of such a wink and nudge which moves even beyond death connects the fundamental tragedy which underlies humor to the absurd tragedy of life, itself. Not everyone needs such bizarre little requirements met, however; nor the ego-stoking of matching wits with some great author. Wodehouse presents little idiomatic tales which achieve the greatest challenge of any author: making pointless drivel seem as important in writing as it is in our everyday lives. In a world where books seem to have the ability to make all-powerful, beautiful, serendipidous, charming gods into boring cliches, he is a welcome refreshment.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Lydia

    What is it about Wodehouse? It's not just the tone, the subject-matter, his vapid, idle, unintentionally-deprecating idiots that wreak havoc on two continents while dressed in the latest fashions. He takes not only England and its society, but the usually sober themes of marriage, inheritance, death, and friends, as his own comic inventions, and makes us laugh so hard at the vagaries of existence that we burst out laughing in libraries and offend everyone around us. This book in general deals wi What is it about Wodehouse? It's not just the tone, the subject-matter, his vapid, idle, unintentionally-deprecating idiots that wreak havoc on two continents while dressed in the latest fashions. He takes not only England and its society, but the usually sober themes of marriage, inheritance, death, and friends, as his own comic inventions, and makes us laugh so hard at the vagaries of existence that we burst out laughing in libraries and offend everyone around us. This book in general deals with disappointed love, and in particular that suffered by the members of the Drones Club, an institution rendered immortal by the inclusion of the honorable Bertie Wooster amongst their number. He doesn't make an appearance, alas, but it speaks volumes for this one book that he and his Jeeves are scarcely missed.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Abigail

    This wasn't my favorite style of Wodehouse. Young Men in Spats is a collection of short stories, but there were a couple of very funny chapters! This wasn't my favorite style of Wodehouse. Young Men in Spats is a collection of short stories, but there were a couple of very funny chapters!

  14. 5 out of 5

    Elisha Condie

    This is a set of short stories featuring members of the Drones Club. The club of young gentlemen, friends of Bertie Wooster, who are always getting into some jam or another. The story about Freddie Widgeon trying to make a good impression on his girlfriend's family while at the same time tripping over, stepping on, and sitting atop of their dang collection of cats made me laugh out loud. It was poetic. I also loved the story about Archibald Mulliner and how he wants to serve the less fortunate This is a set of short stories featuring members of the Drones Club. The club of young gentlemen, friends of Bertie Wooster, who are always getting into some jam or another. The story about Freddie Widgeon trying to make a good impression on his girlfriend's family while at the same time tripping over, stepping on, and sitting atop of their dang collection of cats made me laugh out loud. It was poetic. I also loved the story about Archibald Mulliner and how he wants to serve the less fortunate and goes down to Bottleton East to give bread to the masses. But, the child he tries to give a loaf to tosses it at him and he chases the kid down, intending to shove the bally bread down his throat. I wish the Drones Club was real. Add it to the list of literary-worlds-I-wish-were-real, Jeeves. Very good, Madam.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Jason Furman

    Consistently light, whimsical, funny, but also taking place in a coherent universe that sprung from his imagination, P.G. Wodehouse is one of the most consistent prolific authors and Young Men in Spats is no exception. The stories revolve around the Drones club and features characters that show up elsewhere in Wodehouse canon. Each of the stories begins with a framing discussion in the club that leads someone to recount a story, more often than not about Freddie Widgeon, that involves a series of Consistently light, whimsical, funny, but also taking place in a coherent universe that sprung from his imagination, P.G. Wodehouse is one of the most consistent prolific authors and Young Men in Spats is no exception. The stories revolve around the Drones club and features characters that show up elsewhere in Wodehouse canon. Each of the stories begins with a framing discussion in the club that leads someone to recount a story, more often than not about Freddie Widgeon, that involves a series of genteel misunderstandings, accidents, hapless loves, sometimes ending well and sometimes ending badly, but always with the same measure of good cheer.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Steve Walker

    The reader must be warned before reading Wodehouse, ANY Wodehouse. The reader should not be in area where out burst of laughter are frowned upon and the reader should be careful as to what they are doing while reading. For example: I would not attempt to eat, operate electrical or mechanical equipment, or shave while reading. It would be best to find a comfortable chair, sit down and prepare to enjoy one of the greatest writers of the 20th century.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Trixie Fontaine

    I might have enjoyed this even more than the Wooster & Jeeves books. LOVED the last story, which was oddly disturbing (only mildly so, of course, which made it very surreal). Also appreciated the self-consciousness (again, MILD) regarding class issues. This stuff is too much fun and sometimes all I want to read.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Anna Kļaviņa

    Fate Tried in the Furnace Trouble Down at Tudsleigh The Amazing Hat Mystery Goodbye to all Cats The Luck of the Stiffhams Noblesse Oblige Uncle Fred Flits By Archibald and the Masses The Code of the Mulliners The Fiery Wooing of Mordred

  19. 4 out of 5

    Rumaisah

    A dear friend of mine recommended books by PG Wodehouse a good many years ago. She had also then recommended Jonathan Stroud’s Bartimaeus trilogy. Though I still have to read the last two books in the trilogy, I’m not sure if I’m ever reading a book by PG Wodehouse again. The book is made up of eleven parts. The first eight have to do with the Drones Club and the last three with Mr Mulliner. Almost every story gave me something to laugh at, but I didn’t find the stories as funny. I also found th A dear friend of mine recommended books by PG Wodehouse a good many years ago. She had also then recommended Jonathan Stroud’s Bartimaeus trilogy. Though I still have to read the last two books in the trilogy, I’m not sure if I’m ever reading a book by PG Wodehouse again. The book is made up of eleven parts. The first eight have to do with the Drones Club and the last three with Mr Mulliner. Almost every story gave me something to laugh at, but I didn’t find the stories as funny. I also found the writing verbose and took more time to finish this book than was needed. I can’t talk of any particular story as my favourite. I’m rating it 3 stars because the book served the purpose of making me laugh. However, I didn’t find it funny enough to pick another one of Wodehouse’s works.

  20. 4 out of 5

    John Frankham

    Wonderful stories, mainly concerning the misfortunes in love of the well-meaning, if dim, young men based at the aptly-named Drones club. So exuberant, witty, brilliant use of proper and conversational English. Wodehouse - a master of his trade. The GR blurb: ‘These eleven stories describe the misadventures of the delightfully idle "Eggs," "Beans," and "Crumpets" that populate the Drones club: young men wearing spats, starting spats, and landing in sticky spots. For the first of his many appearanc Wonderful stories, mainly concerning the misfortunes in love of the well-meaning, if dim, young men based at the aptly-named Drones club. So exuberant, witty, brilliant use of proper and conversational English. Wodehouse - a master of his trade. The GR blurb: ‘These eleven stories describe the misadventures of the delightfully idle "Eggs," "Beans," and "Crumpets" that populate the Drones club: young men wearing spats, starting spats, and landing in sticky spots. For the first of his many appearances in the Wodehouse canon, Uncle Fred comes to what he believes to be the rescue.’

  21. 4 out of 5

    Selah

    Wodehouse is delightful as always!

  22. 5 out of 5

    Nicholas Martens

    First-rate Wodehouse. Finally I've gotten to read how Uncle Fred and Pongo pretend to come to clip the parrot's claws, as alluded to in Uncle Dynamite. I think I laughed harder during "Goodbye to All Cats" than anything I've read. First-rate Wodehouse. Finally I've gotten to read how Uncle Fred and Pongo pretend to come to clip the parrot's claws, as alluded to in Uncle Dynamite. I think I laughed harder during "Goodbye to All Cats" than anything I've read.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Shashi

    "Uncle Fred Flits By" and "The Amazing Hat Mystery" are the clear highlights. However, all the other stories are also very enjoyable! "Uncle Fred Flits By" and "The Amazing Hat Mystery" are the clear highlights. However, all the other stories are also very enjoyable!

  24. 4 out of 5

    Judy

    These eleven stories are quintessentially Wodehouseian, focusing on the foibles, romantic entanglements and other dramas that envelop the British upper class. In this collection, the stories revolve around members of the Drones club, whose member groups have names such as Eggs, Beans, and Crumpets. Freddie Widgeon is always falling in love at first sight and is forever trying to extricate himself from trouble and misunderstandings. . . Pongo, who must deal with a daffy uncle who insists on prete These eleven stories are quintessentially Wodehouseian, focusing on the foibles, romantic entanglements and other dramas that envelop the British upper class. In this collection, the stories revolve around members of the Drones club, whose member groups have names such as Eggs, Beans, and Crumpets. Freddie Widgeon is always falling in love at first sight and is forever trying to extricate himself from trouble and misunderstandings. . . Pongo, who must deal with a daffy uncle who insists on pretending to be the owners of an empty country house. . . and Archibald, who is the star of two of the funniest of the stories of all. One is "Archibald and the Masses," when, under the influence of his valet, decides to become a socialist. When Archibald decides he must hear "the voice of the people" and his valet, Meadows, talks of the coming revolution: "Like in Russia, you mean?" "Yes, sir." "Massacres and all that?" "Yes, sir." "Now listen, Meadows," said Archibald firmly. "Fun's fun, but no rot about stabbing me with a dripping knife. I won't have it, do you understand?" "Very good, sir." Archibald's visit to the lower social echelons of London to "help" inevitably lead to mishaps that erase his temporary solidarity with the people, but not without great hilarity. Another Wodehouse winner!

  25. 4 out of 5

    Honoria

    Wodehouse excelled at the short story, and this tip-top collection brims with some of his finest and fruitiest. It includes the well known classic (well known among discerning readers anyway) 'Uncle Fred Flits By', in which Pongo Twistleton endures a visit from his Uncle Fred, temporarily 'off the leash' and at large in the metropolis. Uncle Fred's seemingly harmless plan to visit the suburbs results in the pair impersonating a vet, a mute parrot anaesthetist, and a Mr Roddis of the Cedars, Mitc Wodehouse excelled at the short story, and this tip-top collection brims with some of his finest and fruitiest. It includes the well known classic (well known among discerning readers anyway) 'Uncle Fred Flits By', in which Pongo Twistleton endures a visit from his Uncle Fred, temporarily 'off the leash' and at large in the metropolis. Uncle Fred's seemingly harmless plan to visit the suburbs results in the pair impersonating a vet, a mute parrot anaesthetist, and a Mr Roddis of the Cedars, Mitching Hill. Another offering is one of my favourite Wodehouse stories, 'Tried in the Furnace', in which Wodehouse displays his expert knowledge of knock-about-cross-talk acts. His description of the Mothers' Annual Outing reduces me to tears, and deserves to be hailed as one of the great moments in fiction.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Yibbie

    It's a rare author who can make me laugh out loud, but Wodehouse hardly ever misses. What a sense of the hilarious he has! Oh every situation, in this collection of short stories, is absolutely over the top funny. For instance, one story, detailing the trials of one young man trying to stay engaged, is followed by one chronicling the struggles of another young man to get his girl to dump him. Though by far the best one involves a young man, an old man, a pair of frustrated lovers and some quite It's a rare author who can make me laugh out loud, but Wodehouse hardly ever misses. What a sense of the hilarious he has! Oh every situation, in this collection of short stories, is absolutely over the top funny. For instance, one story, detailing the trials of one young man trying to stay engaged, is followed by one chronicling the struggles of another young man to get his girl to dump him. Though by far the best one involves a young man, an old man, a pair of frustrated lovers and some quite excusable meddling,oh yes, and some unauthorized entering. These are some of his earlier stories, so there are not as many questionable words as in some of his other works. There were a couple, but most of them were in Goodbye to All Cats.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Karin

    Freddi, Pongo and other young men go through no end of scrapes while being in love. Freddie is always falling in love at first sight only to foil his own romantic schemes, and others meet with various levels of success. The stories are all told at their men’s clubs by “crumpets” or by Uncle Fred to other young men, known affectionately only as crumpets, eggs and other edibles. The stories are a mixed bag as far as how funny each is, so I rounded it to three. I only read one story per day to be su Freddi, Pongo and other young men go through no end of scrapes while being in love. Freddie is always falling in love at first sight only to foil his own romantic schemes, and others meet with various levels of success. The stories are all told at their men’s clubs by “crumpets” or by Uncle Fred to other young men, known affectionately only as crumpets, eggs and other edibles. The stories are a mixed bag as far as how funny each is, so I rounded it to three. I only read one story per day to be sure I didn’t tire of the humour and spoil any that way. This is my first time reading one of Wodehouse’s books of short stories, and the first that didn’t feature Wooster and Jeeves

  28. 5 out of 5

    C. A. Powell

    These short stories tickled me pink. I had to stop and chuckle while on the train. Every one of the tales was a fabulous little bundle of laughs. P.G. Wodehouse has some wonderful characters in this. Especially Freddie Widgeon who seems to fall hopelessly in love with every woman he meets and against all the odds manages to cause catastrophic mayhem. He seems to find a way of making a complete dog's breakfast out of every first time meeting of his true loves' parents. You start to get geered up These short stories tickled me pink. I had to stop and chuckle while on the train. Every one of the tales was a fabulous little bundle of laughs. P.G. Wodehouse has some wonderful characters in this. Especially Freddie Widgeon who seems to fall hopelessly in love with every woman he meets and against all the odds manages to cause catastrophic mayhem. He seems to find a way of making a complete dog's breakfast out of every first time meeting of his true loves' parents. You start to get geered up to be imbaressed for him. While giggling with anticipation ay the same time.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Jeff Crompton

    I have a weakness for Wodehouse. This short story collection is from 1936 - a vintage period for Wodehouse. Most of the stories concern the doings of the less-than-brilliant young men of the Drones Club, with three of Mr. Mulliner's tales about his many nephews thrown in. The best of these stories, such as "Tried in the Furnace" and "The Amazing Hat Mystery" are absolutely worthy of five stars, but, as with any Wodehouse collection, some stories are better than others. I have a weakness for Wodehouse. This short story collection is from 1936 - a vintage period for Wodehouse. Most of the stories concern the doings of the less-than-brilliant young men of the Drones Club, with three of Mr. Mulliner's tales about his many nephews thrown in. The best of these stories, such as "Tried in the Furnace" and "The Amazing Hat Mystery" are absolutely worthy of five stars, but, as with any Wodehouse collection, some stories are better than others.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Paul Secor

    Not quite as funny as the two novels I've read, but still worth four stars. I checked off "Tried in the Furnace", "The Luck of the Stiffhams", Uncle Fred Flits By", and "The Code of the Mulliners" as ones to reread at some point. I'm especially looking forward to reading more about Uncle Fred. Not quite as funny as the two novels I've read, but still worth four stars. I checked off "Tried in the Furnace", "The Luck of the Stiffhams", Uncle Fred Flits By", and "The Code of the Mulliners" as ones to reread at some point. I'm especially looking forward to reading more about Uncle Fred.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.