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Violent Python: A Cookbook for Hackers, Forensic Analysts, Penetration Testers and Security Engineers

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Violent Python shows you how to move from a theoretical understanding of offensive computing concepts to a practical implementation. Instead of relying on another attacker's tools, this book will teach you to forge your own weapons using the Python programming language. This book demonstrates how to write Python scripts to automate large-scale network attacks, extract meta Violent Python shows you how to move from a theoretical understanding of offensive computing concepts to a practical implementation. Instead of relying on another attacker's tools, this book will teach you to forge your own weapons using the Python programming language. This book demonstrates how to write Python scripts to automate large-scale network attacks, extract metadata, and investigate forensic artifacts. It also shows how to write code to intercept and analyze network traffic using Python, craft and spoof wireless frames to attack wireless and Bluetooth devices, and how to data-mine popular social media websites and evade modern anti-virus.


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Violent Python shows you how to move from a theoretical understanding of offensive computing concepts to a practical implementation. Instead of relying on another attacker's tools, this book will teach you to forge your own weapons using the Python programming language. This book demonstrates how to write Python scripts to automate large-scale network attacks, extract meta Violent Python shows you how to move from a theoretical understanding of offensive computing concepts to a practical implementation. Instead of relying on another attacker's tools, this book will teach you to forge your own weapons using the Python programming language. This book demonstrates how to write Python scripts to automate large-scale network attacks, extract metadata, and investigate forensic artifacts. It also shows how to write code to intercept and analyze network traffic using Python, craft and spoof wireless frames to attack wireless and Bluetooth devices, and how to data-mine popular social media websites and evade modern anti-virus.

30 review for Violent Python: A Cookbook for Hackers, Forensic Analysts, Penetration Testers and Security Engineers

  1. 4 out of 5

    Acc13

    Disappointing. This book is for beginner scripters seeking an intro to some useful python libraries. For any depth (how those libraries work under the hood, for example), look elsewhere. I was expecting more implementation, rather than just calling into other peoples code where all the fun has been abstracted out. Consequently, most of the exercises over-promise and under-deliver. The only reason I finished is because the simplicity made it a quick read. Examples of why I was disappointed: "Building a Disappointing. This book is for beginner scripters seeking an intro to some useful python libraries. For any depth (how those libraries work under the hood, for example), look elsewhere. I was expecting more implementation, rather than just calling into other peoples code where all the fun has been abstracted out. Consequently, most of the exercises over-promise and under-deliver. The only reason I finished is because the simplicity made it a quick read. Examples of why I was disappointed: "Building a Port Scanner" Wraps nmap, the best known port scanner available, in a python script. You haven't built a port scanner any more than calling the windows registry means you wrote a registry. "Writing your own zero day proof of concept" This is a cut and paste of some shell code (which may be architecture specific - the author glosses over this, yet in same section feels the need to explain what FTP is) targeting a FreeFloat FTP vulnerability on Windows XP from 2011. Given this book was published in 2013, this vulnerability is ancient history by security standards; so titling this a zero-day exploit is more than exaggeration. "Wireless Mayhem" Provides examples on sniffing unencrypted HTTP traffic over wireless, which really has nothing to do with wireless at all, and in the end is just sifting plaintext w/ regexes. "Antivirus Evasion with Python" Repackaging existing exploits in different ways will produce new signatures that may escape sig based antivirus. I was hoping for more active evasion (like counter-heuristics, for example), rather than rearranging bits to produce new signatures. But I should have known better by this point in the book...

  2. 4 out of 5

    Stuart Larsen

    The book is split into six main chapters, and an intro chapter. Each chapter focuses on a specific topic of cracking via python. I enjoyed some chapters more than others. The first chapter was just an intro to python. I don't know if it's any good. The second chapter was about building botnets with a few simple attack vectors, simple bruteforce cracking of ssh/ftp, cracking ssh keys, and interacting with metasploit. The third chapter was forensic investigations with python. Honestly my favorite par The book is split into six main chapters, and an intro chapter. Each chapter focuses on a specific topic of cracking via python. I enjoyed some chapters more than others. The first chapter was just an intro to python. I don't know if it's any good. The second chapter was about building botnets with a few simple attack vectors, simple bruteforce cracking of ssh/ftp, cracking ssh keys, and interacting with metasploit. The third chapter was forensic investigations with python. Honestly my favorite part was the PDF metadata parser. I had been looking for one for awhile, and some simple python code was just sitting right there. It also gets into reading Skype logs and mozzila logs. And the windows registry, if you're into windows. The fourth chapter was on Network traffic analysis. Another really neat program was built here. Using the GeoIP lib, you create an application to track where your information is going. Then using google maps you can create a world map of who all you are talking to. The fifth chapter was on generating and injecting wireless packets. Didn't find it too execiting. Just use ncrack and scapy. THe sixth chapter was on social information gathering. Gathing web pages, parsing tweets. Neat stuff like that for more specific targeted attacks. And last was antivirus evasion using python. Overall I enjoyed the book and will definetly make room for it next to my other infosec books.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Takedown

    Cool book if you want to know how to use python in security field. It mostly about smart usage of API and libraries but still cool and interesting.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Martin

    Me terminó de convencer en lo práctico que resulta Python. En cuanto a técnicas de hacking es algo básico, pero creo que apunta a eso. Aunque sea 2012, me parece que no está del todo actualizado. A excepción por hablar sobre Flame y su complejidad al evadir por más de dos años a todas las firmas de antivirus. Pero como dije, me vendió uy bien Python como lenguaje simple y práctico.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Bengt

    A joyful introduction to netsec using Python and its myriad of third party libraries as your toolbox. I highly recommend it! The examples are well executed and easy to comprehend (and easy to maintain and extend!)

  6. 5 out of 5

    Cameron Smith

    Outdated, poorly written, poorly formatted, and uninteresting. Very little context when new concepts are introduced, boring example projects, and absolutely no interaction between theory and implementation. This book will make you hate Python.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Ahmed Sultan

    This book give you a really great idea about how to use python the smart way , few lines of codes on the fly make you avoid searching , installation or usage of many other tools highly recommended for every pentrster

  8. 5 out of 5

    Khoa

    The book pops up every here and there over online forums whenever there is a question "How to begin" (/r/netsec for example). * Pros: - Author's humor makes the book really amusing to read, despite being a technical book. - Almost every topic is inspired from a real event (such as Operation Aurora) or a common vulnerability / attack vector (such as FTP Anonymous), thus providing a lot of real life examples about how / why something is broken and what to do to exploit / patch it. - All scripts are sh The book pops up every here and there over online forums whenever there is a question "How to begin" (/r/netsec for example). * Pros: - Author's humor makes the book really amusing to read, despite being a technical book. - Almost every topic is inspired from a real event (such as Operation Aurora) or a common vulnerability / attack vector (such as FTP Anonymous), thus providing a lot of real life examples about how / why something is broken and what to do to exploit / patch it. - All scripts are short, self-contained with explanations, also very good, scalable code structures overall, from parsing args to the end. * Cons: - Python 2 is like from 200 BC or something. Also many APIs and databases used in the book are outdated / not available / not compatible with Python 3, which is much more annoying than some slight differences in language syntax. - Not exactly beginner level. As the title of the book suggests: "Cookbook", you should have some basic background knowledge in certain fields, such as basic networking, FTP/SSH, scanning,... * Would I recommend ? - If you are beginner, regardless of new to coding or new to InfoSec, then probably no. Instead I would suggest reading about basic Networking. - If you already know some basics, then yes. The text is really resourceful and informative than the code, don't skimp it or anything. - If you are experienced already, then probably a no, most tools here is a bit simple in comparison to common tools (nmap, hydra,...). However you might find some inspirations here. Personally I learnt quite a lot in forensic stuff, like using huge database mapping IP to locations to see the past connections. I would skip most of the code and go for the text only.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Scott Johnson

    This was an excellent transition book to learn how to build and detect exploits yourself. Typically, this sort of grey-hat manual goes no further than introducing script-kiddie tools like Metasploit, never telling you how to go one step further and add to them yourself. It's very informative to structure this to follow well-known incidents, first explaining what happened and then showing how simple this is to translate into Python. It provides a much more down-to-earth and easy-to-follow view of This was an excellent transition book to learn how to build and detect exploits yourself. Typically, this sort of grey-hat manual goes no further than introducing script-kiddie tools like Metasploit, never telling you how to go one step further and add to them yourself. It's very informative to structure this to follow well-known incidents, first explaining what happened and then showing how simple this is to translate into Python. It provides a much more down-to-earth and easy-to-follow view of the topics at hand than your typical theory-centric approach. I think a good portion of this just went in one ear and out the other, it's really a book I should work through at a computer where I can follow along. But that's fine for a programming book, I'd rather it have too much to absorb by just reading than to be bored. I'd highly recommend this over any other so-called hacking manuals I've read before.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Chad Zody

    Python is the perfect language for quickly creating forensics tools. The language is easy to learn and has the power of classes. The book does a great job teaching beginners and is a great reference.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Jolan

    Great introduction to pen testing.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Ben Yu

    Not very in-depth. Examples are a bunch of wrappers around existing libraries, sniffing over HTTP or simple webscraping...

  13. 4 out of 5

    Balhau

    This is a very interesting book. On this book Connor achieves a very difficult objective. The work it has done here is simultaneously broad, historical relevant and relatively deep in content while simplifying to the maximum the approach and the code developed. The language sits like a glove here as well as the frameworks chosen to tackle every single problem purposed. The author is a very pragmatic one and, as you'll see as soon as you read the book, knowledgeable one. I truly recommend this bo This is a very interesting book. On this book Connor achieves a very difficult objective. The work it has done here is simultaneously broad, historical relevant and relatively deep in content while simplifying to the maximum the approach and the code developed. The language sits like a glove here as well as the frameworks chosen to tackle every single problem purposed. The author is a very pragmatic one and, as you'll see as soon as you read the book, knowledgeable one. I truly recommend this book to all of you that wanna get a little more hands on on the field of computer security while having fun testing nasty attacks on your virtual machines (or not if you are true evil). The only reason why I gave four stars and not five is simple. The book is few more than 200 pages and in my opinion it could easily get more 200 with equally interesting content. Some of the chapters could be more explored and some more interesting attacks could be achieved. I understand the author in the approach and the efforts done in maintaining the accessibility for the not so knowledge reader but I believe that some more could be achieved. In an overall overview I think that this is an excellent book and all of you should give it a chance.

  14. 4 out of 5

    John Dideriksen

    You should wrestle the violent python! It's filled with quick and easy language, fun anecdotes and very violent python snipplets. When combined with your own creativity and playfullness there's no end to just how easy you can unleash the python on your own network, your friends and your social media accounts. The book takes you through 3rd party libraries for analysing network traffic, reading geo locations etc. All examples are simple, so if you're looking for sofisticated cookbook examples on h You should wrestle the violent python! It's filled with quick and easy language, fun anecdotes and very violent python snipplets. When combined with your own creativity and playfullness there's no end to just how easy you can unleash the python on your own network, your friends and your social media accounts. The book takes you through 3rd party libraries for analysing network traffic, reading geo locations etc. All examples are simple, so if you're looking for sofisticated cookbook examples on how to create dictionary function lookups this is not the book to read. What thrilled me most about this book was the python codes simplicity for so called 'sofisticated' attacks. the 5th star would have been given if the book came with a linux livecd with a running environment and all source code. The books main link to the source code seems broken. leaving you stuck with typing stuff, unless you somehow manage to find the source.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Paul Childs

    This was a pretty interesting book on using Python for a variety of tasks that are mentioned in the title. I am relatively newto Python and found it to be a useful way to be introduced to how things can be done and what modules would be needed to do them. In general I found the code in the book to be clear enough that I was able to follow it, and the concepts where easily understandable. There were times that I would have trouble with the code in a chapter which would lead to a couple of hours go This was a pretty interesting book on using Python for a variety of tasks that are mentioned in the title. I am relatively newto Python and found it to be a useful way to be introduced to how things can be done and what modules would be needed to do them. In general I found the code in the book to be clear enough that I was able to follow it, and the concepts where easily understandable. There were times that I would have trouble with the code in a chapter which would lead to a couple of hours googling for reasons as to why it wouldn't work or why I was having my problems. (I would really recommend not trying to do these examples with Python 3 like I started to do, for example.) A wide variety of topics were covered in this book, not all of them were interesting to me, but many I found to be well worth the time spent, such as Penetration Testing and Network Packet Analysis.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Christopher

    It is written in a humorous writing style, which makes it a fun read. However it feels like I am not the intended audience for this book. As an experienced python developer the coding parts seemed very trivial (it begins from the very basics). On the upside there are some interesting introductions to some third party libraries. The security bits where often interesting and based of on real attacks, which I liked. However there were not much depth in explaining the attacks or the methology behind It is written in a humorous writing style, which makes it a fun read. However it feels like I am not the intended audience for this book. As an experienced python developer the coding parts seemed very trivial (it begins from the very basics). On the upside there are some interesting introductions to some third party libraries. The security bits where often interesting and based of on real attacks, which I liked. However there were not much depth in explaining the attacks or the methology behind discovering them. I would recommend the book to someone with a good understanding of penetration testing but wanted to learn python (in an example heavy way), rather than the other way around. Fun and inspiring.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Chetan Singh

    First of all i would like to thanks TJ. O'Conner for writing this wonderful book i really enjoyed. now i come to review In this book the author has done wonderful job by taking excellent examples from past (infosec field) to demonstrate various tools and technique using the power of python language, the codes are easy to understand and the example which author has chosen for this cook book add more excitement in the reader that not to stop reading this book, apart from the code and examples the lan First of all i would like to thanks TJ. O'Conner for writing this wonderful book i really enjoyed. now i come to review In this book the author has done wonderful job by taking excellent examples from past (infosec field) to demonstrate various tools and technique using the power of python language, the codes are easy to understand and the example which author has chosen for this cook book add more excitement in the reader that not to stop reading this book, apart from the code and examples the language is easy to understand for beginners, overall this book is must have for everyone who want to make career in infosec.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Chuk Yong

    This is a fantastic book for anyone interested in starting onto the world of hacking. You will need basic level of coding experience and understanding of computer security and networking because after the first chapter, it quickly gets going. It offers a fast track into various hacking techniques used in real world cases. Guiding the readers through how attacks were conducted and what he counter measurements necessary to mitigate them. This is easily one of the most relevant and interesting book This is a fantastic book for anyone interested in starting onto the world of hacking. You will need basic level of coding experience and understanding of computer security and networking because after the first chapter, it quickly gets going. It offers a fast track into various hacking techniques used in real world cases. Guiding the readers through how attacks were conducted and what he counter measurements necessary to mitigate them. This is easily one of the most relevant and interesting book on hacking.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Neal Aggarwal

    An excellent resource that motivates many of my students to dive deeper into programming. That it uses python is even more up our street. The examples are skimpy and not 'real world' in any sense of the phrase but they get across a lot of ideas and open up a pathway that my students can then follow to further their knowledge of computer systems. My sequence in teaching computing is Learn Python the Hard Way >> Dive Into Python 3 >> This book >> The Elements of Computer Systems (the Noam/Shocken An excellent resource that motivates many of my students to dive deeper into programming. That it uses python is even more up our street. The examples are skimpy and not 'real world' in any sense of the phrase but they get across a lot of ideas and open up a pathway that my students can then follow to further their knowledge of computer systems. My sequence in teaching computing is Learn Python the Hard Way >> Dive Into Python 3 >> This book >> The Elements of Computer Systems (the Noam/Shocken book/course).

  20. 4 out of 5

    Julio

    Nice book. TJ O'Connor's background is enough to make you want to read it. Although his prose can be vague or redundant, his python is quite interesting. For instance, I loved how he uses exceptions to output a successful match of a brute force password cracker, rather than loop until it equals x. Another great reason to read this book is for the bibliography. It has some excellent references which will keep me busy for quite some time. Nice book. TJ O'Connor's background is enough to make you want to read it. Although his prose can be vague or redundant, his python is quite interesting. For instance, I loved how he uses exceptions to output a successful match of a brute force password cracker, rather than loop until it equals x. Another great reason to read this book is for the bibliography. It has some excellent references which will keep me busy for quite some time.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Tadas Talaikis

    First chapter. No idea how to crack random generated passwords, when there are billions of billions of possible combinations. On the other hand, after reading this book, got lots of information, doesn't matter it's on outdated Python 2.7, many even tech aware people use ridiculously idiotic short, one word passwords for wireless routers, password and crypto-wallets. With increasing "technologization", just one undetectable keylogger and someone can steal everything, not just data. First chapter. No idea how to crack random generated passwords, when there are billions of billions of possible combinations. On the other hand, after reading this book, got lots of information, doesn't matter it's on outdated Python 2.7, many even tech aware people use ridiculously idiotic short, one word passwords for wireless routers, password and crypto-wallets. With increasing "technologization", just one undetectable keylogger and someone can steal everything, not just data.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Marek Krajewski

    Its a 2012 book, thus a little bit outdated, but nonetheless it shows you a collection of attack techniques. Repeating all the code at the end on a chapter is somehow irritating. Learned: - Ironically, Guido's efforts to create a beginner friendly language for CS-newbies ended in Python being the best language for criminal hackers! Its a 2012 book, thus a little bit outdated, but nonetheless it shows you a collection of attack techniques. Repeating all the code at the end on a chapter is somehow irritating. Learned: - Ironically, Guido's efforts to create a beginner friendly language for CS-newbies ended in Python being the best language for criminal hackers!

  23. 4 out of 5

    Hristo Deshev

    First a warning -- don't expect to get some deep Python insights from this book. That isn't really the point. The book shines as a tour of the wide range of Python tools that you can use to wreak havoc (or defend against that) on your network. I really enjoyed the parts on using scapy and dpkg to parse captured network packets, sniff them yourself, and craft your own ones. First a warning -- don't expect to get some deep Python insights from this book. That isn't really the point. The book shines as a tour of the wide range of Python tools that you can use to wreak havoc (or defend against that) on your network. I really enjoyed the parts on using scapy and dpkg to parse captured network packets, sniff them yourself, and craft your own ones.

  24. 5 out of 5

    George Silva

    i enjoyed this book. i did read it entirely, but i mostly liked to see s e of pythons dark side. i knew some of the tools mentioned on this book, but i really did not know how much interesting they are. the author successfully combined pythons simple nature with classical security breaches examples. its interesting, but not for beginners

  25. 5 out of 5

    Justin Andrusk

    This book had a lot of good examples and I really liked the various modules that were incorporated for various use cases. The source code in the book could have been better aligned as in certain spots it was difficult to tell which section you were in given various indents. Overall I would recommend it.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Eduardo Hideo

    bom livro para entender um pouco sobre invasões, ele conta a história de várias invasões e implementa o código em python. Apesar do livro ser atual (2012), bugs surgem e são corrigidos a todo momento, então, esse assunto está sempre desatualizado.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Ruben Fonseca

    Some things are overly simplified, but overall a good book that shows the simplicity of huge security holes in the past.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Rcsk

    It is exactly what I expected. Concise and terse.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Andrew

    Accidentally bought this with 1-click. It wasn't actually that bad though. Doesn't really cover much that is immediately useful to me, and I was already familiar with a lot of the material. Accidentally bought this with 1-click. It wasn't actually that bad though. Doesn't really cover much that is immediately useful to me, and I was already familiar with a lot of the material.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Dgg32

    Learned tons of new knowledge within these pages. Plus some working knowledge of the network. It is a very good book for python programmers to make a step from primary to intermediate.

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