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Children of the Sea, Volume 5

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Long-awaited conclusion to the critically acclaimed series!When Ruka was younger, she saw a ghost in the water at the aquarium where her dad works. Now she feels drawn toward the aquarium and the two mysterious boys she meets there, Umi and Sora. They were raised by dugongs and hear the same strange calls from the sea as she does. After following Umi deep into the ocean, Ru Long-awaited conclusion to the critically acclaimed series!When Ruka was younger, she saw a ghost in the water at the aquarium where her dad works. Now she feels drawn toward the aquarium and the two mysterious boys she meets there, Umi and Sora. They were raised by dugongs and hear the same strange calls from the sea as she does. After following Umi deep into the ocean, Ruka finds herself in an undersea cave where she hears a voice calling to her. She soon realizes it is the meteorite in her stomach, telling her the next step in her journey. The FINAL VOLUME of this majestic tale.


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Long-awaited conclusion to the critically acclaimed series!When Ruka was younger, she saw a ghost in the water at the aquarium where her dad works. Now she feels drawn toward the aquarium and the two mysterious boys she meets there, Umi and Sora. They were raised by dugongs and hear the same strange calls from the sea as she does. After following Umi deep into the ocean, Ru Long-awaited conclusion to the critically acclaimed series!When Ruka was younger, she saw a ghost in the water at the aquarium where her dad works. Now she feels drawn toward the aquarium and the two mysterious boys she meets there, Umi and Sora. They were raised by dugongs and hear the same strange calls from the sea as she does. After following Umi deep into the ocean, Ruka finds herself in an undersea cave where she hears a voice calling to her. She soon realizes it is the meteorite in her stomach, telling her the next step in her journey. The FINAL VOLUME of this majestic tale.

30 review for Children of the Sea, Volume 5

  1. 5 out of 5

    Dave Schaafsma

    Well, I won't give the details of the ending away, but for me it was immensely satisfying. As I've said in earlier reviews, this is less about a coherent tale and more about mystery. All of our questions are not fully answered. And following a set up i the last volume, where we are led to see the limitations of language, we get a final volume that is essentially wordless… well, to be specific, 2/3 of it is wordless, where we see the sea and its creatures depicted in great detail. As Dehdeh says, Well, I won't give the details of the ending away, but for me it was immensely satisfying. As I've said in earlier reviews, this is less about a coherent tale and more about mystery. All of our questions are not fully answered. And following a set up i the last volume, where we are led to see the limitations of language, we get a final volume that is essentially wordless… well, to be specific, 2/3 of it is wordless, where we see the sea and its creatures depicted in great detail. As Dehdeh says, "precious things are better left unspoken." But intermittently, as through the series, we get from around the world "testimonies of the sea" that open up mysteries and make it clear most people who know the sea from living on or around it defy the limitations of scientific knowledge about it. From the fourth to the fifth volume it took three years, so you know the art is painstakingly detailed, and the purposes and both mystical and epic, a colossal undertaking. This one is about birth, primarily, in various ways, births emanating from the sea. As DehDeh (who is a kind of sailing sea philosopher) says, "If we liken the universe to a living being, this planet of ocean is the living womb." The sea harbors memory, is collective memory. Unexplained mysteries. Beauty. The importance of listening to the sea instead of just merely studying it with the scientific method (though that is useful, too). Local knowledge and local lore and every day experience of the sea and nature in general as trumping other forms of official knowledge. Impressive accomplishment I think, as this one (sort of) wraps up, without all the answers, defying conventional narrative expectations. I notice Goodreads raters liked this volume least, but this I liked best, once I settled in tot he rhythm of the series, and I see this finish as most appropriate to its cosmic environmental intentions.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Sesana

    This is definitely a series that rewards the patient reader. Luckily, I can be patient. And more than that, the panels of of sea life were so arrestingly beautiful to me that I would have happily read all five volumes if there'd been no story at all, just page after page of beautiful underwater scenes. But there is a story, albeit a slow-moving, very dense one. I'd be lying if I said I fully understood the story and everything that happened. But I was satisfied with where it ended up. Still, I w This is definitely a series that rewards the patient reader. Luckily, I can be patient. And more than that, the panels of of sea life were so arrestingly beautiful to me that I would have happily read all five volumes if there'd been no story at all, just page after page of beautiful underwater scenes. But there is a story, albeit a slow-moving, very dense one. I'd be lying if I said I fully understood the story and everything that happened. But I was satisfied with where it ended up. Still, I would say to read this series for the lovely art more than the story.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Nelson

    A more perfect finale could not have been written. I know some would prefer something clearer, but that would be missing the point of the story. The manga provides ample information to form whatever lens you wish to view the events of the story through. "[...] you'll have to figure it out yourself. You must search for the meaning alone. Although the truth was made clear before you came here." "People love to attach meaning to every little thing. But who knows if it's really valid? [...] Anyone who A more perfect finale could not have been written. I know some would prefer something clearer, but that would be missing the point of the story. The manga provides ample information to form whatever lens you wish to view the events of the story through. "[...] you'll have to figure it out yourself. You must search for the meaning alone. Although the truth was made clear before you came here." "People love to attach meaning to every little thing. But who knows if it's really valid? [...] Anyone who believes what I say is a fool. The language of the waves and the wind is so simple... yet everyone over-analyzes it."

  4. 4 out of 5

    Wally Xie

    Wow. Just finished this. One of the finest things I've ever read. I cannot fathom the universe of ideas and concepts inside Igarashi Daisuke's head-- for sure, he is a genius for writing Children of the Sea. At a certain point in volume 5, the work became one of the few pieces of art I've experienced that defies analysis and day-to-day logic, joining a personal pantheon of other cherished works that include Neutral Milk Hotel's In The Aeroplane Under The Sea, Ingmar Bergman's Persona, One Hundred Wow. Just finished this. One of the finest things I've ever read. I cannot fathom the universe of ideas and concepts inside Igarashi Daisuke's head-- for sure, he is a genius for writing Children of the Sea. At a certain point in volume 5, the work became one of the few pieces of art I've experienced that defies analysis and day-to-day logic, joining a personal pantheon of other cherished works that include Neutral Milk Hotel's In The Aeroplane Under The Sea, Ingmar Bergman's Persona, One Hundred Years of Solitude, and The Clockwork Orange. There were lots of things about Children of the Sea that I did not understand at a surface level. For example, I'm still figuring out how the Testimonies of the Sea described myths, folklore that were only loosely topically related in that they were about the ocean, but still felt, for lack of a better word, metaphysically connected. At a more general scale, I wonder about the enigma of the plot, the inner universes driving the characters. But for my gut, everything about Children of the Sea felt natural and made sense, beautiful, intuitive sense. Fittingly, acceptance of mystery, the unknowable, all that defies human language and sensory processing are all themes presented in the book, so taking Igarashi Daisuke's advice, for the time being, I will stop trying to jam thoughts into words, and will continue wondering, appreciating the fact that while I still have no idea what the hell transpired across those pages, I have come away with a greater appreciation for the universe, for the planet, life, and bodies of water. I understand that I speak in vague, nonspecific hyperbole. Just read this thing for yourself. I'd venture to say that even if Children of the Sea is not your cup of tea in terms of enjoyment and escapism, it's worth reading to peer into the mind of someone (namely, Igarashi Daisuke), who approaches the world from a different, mysterious perspective.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Aaron S

    Children of the Sea kept up a feeling of equal parts horror and wonder all the way up to the end. This series filled me with deep existential curiosity of a kind I haven't often felt since I was a child. In a traditional sense there's not much of a story, but instead the evocative seascape imagery fills your heart with all kinds of strange and contradictory feelings. A brilliant experience of sequential art. Children of the Sea kept up a feeling of equal parts horror and wonder all the way up to the end. This series filled me with deep existential curiosity of a kind I haven't often felt since I was a child. In a traditional sense there's not much of a story, but instead the evocative seascape imagery fills your heart with all kinds of strange and contradictory feelings. A brilliant experience of sequential art.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Nicola Mansfield

    Finally the conclusion to the "Children of the Sea". Having waited three years between publication of volumes 4 and 5, I decided to re-read the first four before diving into this one and I am so glad that I did. This manga is classified as seinen, aimed at an under 40's male audience and contains a very deep metaphysical, existential plot that I think the author allows the reader to put their own meaning and deeper understanding into. I found this last volume absolutely fascinating and rewarding Finally the conclusion to the "Children of the Sea". Having waited three years between publication of volumes 4 and 5, I decided to re-read the first four before diving into this one and I am so glad that I did. This manga is classified as seinen, aimed at an under 40's male audience and contains a very deep metaphysical, existential plot that I think the author allows the reader to put their own meaning and deeper understanding into. I found this last volume absolutely fascinating and rewarding. I'm not going to say anything that happens so this may all sound mysterious to those who don't know what I'm talking about. The story ends as it begins with the woman on the boat talking to the boy and I'm not going to say who they are but this is important to remember from book one. I had talked about the importance of birth in the last volume and hoped this one would culminate in that theme and boy does it ever! The ocean is compared to the womb and I found the whole story when given this ending to be incredibly pro-life! I'd like to re-read the whole thing again in a few years with that theme in mind as I read. This volume contains a lot, and I do mean a lot, of wordless panels so we get to experience the full glory of Igarashi's intricate, awesome artwork of marine life. Nothing is spelled out for you in this series though, so it isn't gong to be to everyones tastes. But it sure is to mine and this series will stay on my shelves permanently.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Child960801

    So, I don't get. The big event happens, and Umi turns into the universe, and then various sea creatures turn into the universe, and then he dissolves. So... hmmm. These books were all so beautiful. The story and the flashbacks and 'testimony of the sea' things were all cool. I think I would recommend these books, even though I don't really get them. So, I don't get. The big event happens, and Umi turns into the universe, and then various sea creatures turn into the universe, and then he dissolves. So... hmmm. These books were all so beautiful. The story and the flashbacks and 'testimony of the sea' things were all cool. I think I would recommend these books, even though I don't really get them.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Danielle

    I’m not even sure how to describe this series or why I liked it so much. From the first volume it had me hooked with its unique and detailed visual style and it’s strange and mysterious story. I love anything to do with the ocean, so that was definitely my first draw to this series, and the artwork on all the sea creatures and water and space throughout was superb. I FELT like I was under the water or traveling over it or through it. It was such a visual story, especially this last volume, but t I’m not even sure how to describe this series or why I liked it so much. From the first volume it had me hooked with its unique and detailed visual style and it’s strange and mysterious story. I love anything to do with the ocean, so that was definitely my first draw to this series, and the artwork on all the sea creatures and water and space throughout was superb. I FELT like I was under the water or traveling over it or through it. It was such a visual story, especially this last volume, but the dialogue isn’t wasted either and despite the surreal nature of the story it still managed to create characters that seemed real and poignant and maybe not quite human and yet human. It is a story that is in part mythic, in part cosmic, in part existential and goes places that felt otherworldly, even though we never leave earth. I was honestly mesmerized by it and don’t think I can compare it to anything else I’ve read in either manga or books. It was truly unique on all fronts and explores a connection between myths, people, life, the ocean and the universe. I wasn’t prepared for how surreal it would become and I was pleasantly surprised by it all. Truly a unique and fantastic series worth the accolades it’s been given.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Fae

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Once upon a time, in my impressionable youth, I used to spend hours at the local library in the 'Graphic Novels' section perusing volumes of Battle Angel Alita, Evangelion, and Akira. While the Children of the Sea series does not involve radioactive children, cyborgs or child soldiers, it still gave me similar vibes when it came to the plot... of which it is very hard to follow at times. From what I can gather, there is a meteorite that is the origin of all the water in the oceans and a girl, Ru Once upon a time, in my impressionable youth, I used to spend hours at the local library in the 'Graphic Novels' section perusing volumes of Battle Angel Alita, Evangelion, and Akira. While the Children of the Sea series does not involve radioactive children, cyborgs or child soldiers, it still gave me similar vibes when it came to the plot... of which it is very hard to follow at times. From what I can gather, there is a meteorite that is the origin of all the water in the oceans and a girl, Ruka, swallowed it and by doing so has triggered a strange chain of events. Umi, a boy raised by dugongs with his brother, Sora, whom she met at the beginning of summer, finds her in a cave and removes the meteor from her mouth and swallows it himself, thus ensuring that he will become one with the ocean and the universe? Probably the most gorgeous manga I have ever come across! The depth and detail are evident in every panel, plus the visual storytelling is beyond anything I have seen before. Highly recommended for hardcore manga fans jonesing for the good old days of when reading manga was like entering another dimension of thought.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Stephanie - Books Less Travelled

    Such an interesting and satisfying ending! This story is unlike anything I have read before, and it's so complex it's amazing! While I didn't love the art, it was beautiful and well-done in a folk-art sort of way, and fit perfectly with the story. I did love the colored art of the underwater scenes, through-out the series I was amazed by all the tiny details shown in the lighting and motion of the water when colored. I enjoyed reading this one, and definitely recommend this series to anyone who Such an interesting and satisfying ending! This story is unlike anything I have read before, and it's so complex it's amazing! While I didn't love the art, it was beautiful and well-done in a folk-art sort of way, and fit perfectly with the story. I did love the colored art of the underwater scenes, through-out the series I was amazed by all the tiny details shown in the lighting and motion of the water when colored. I enjoyed reading this one, and definitely recommend this series to anyone who likes myth/folk-lore type stories! It has such a traditional old-timey feel that I enjoyed, and while I'm glad to know how things turned out, I will miss the depth this story shared! Such a unique read!

  11. 4 out of 5

    Stefanie

    3,5 Unfortunatly I was disappointed by this last volume. There was a lack of story overall in this volume. Some recently added story arcs ended, without having an answer to them. I already felt like they had been pushed in, and now, oops, they needed to end. This story is a mystery, and the questions at the end about what really happened in the ocean were great. But a lot of the other things felt convenient. Characters that we didn't know became important and I couldn't bring myself to care about 3,5 Unfortunatly I was disappointed by this last volume. There was a lack of story overall in this volume. Some recently added story arcs ended, without having an answer to them. I already felt like they had been pushed in, and now, oops, they needed to end. This story is a mystery, and the questions at the end about what really happened in the ocean were great. But a lot of the other things felt convenient. Characters that we didn't know became important and I couldn't bring myself to care about it. Why they were important? I didn't get an answer to that. This is not unusual in of itself, but not for a whole cast of characters! The artstyle is Beautiful and just what I wanted, but it felt so much more like it was an art book, many pages that I just whisked by. It even got to a Point were I asked myself if the author tried to just show off. I gave up trying to find any clues on those pages because I was convinced that there wasn't any. It really felt like the most pages was dedicated to really good imagery, than a conclusion - and could have been cut. Recommend? Volume 1-3, absolutly! Number 4, sure. 5? Well, there are at least some conclusion in this volume.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Monica

    There's definitely some parts that still seem unanswered even though it's the end of the series. Most of this book was depicted in pictures and not words, so it was difficult to deduct what was happening to the main characters. Definitely an interesting series to say the least, and very deep meanings, most of which I may have missed. There's definitely some parts that still seem unanswered even though it's the end of the series. Most of this book was depicted in pictures and not words, so it was difficult to deduct what was happening to the main characters. Definitely an interesting series to say the least, and very deep meanings, most of which I may have missed.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Alyssa

    The entire story was really creative. Even when they did the cutback scenes it was interesting. I feel like the ending left me hanging. Not sure if I was satisfied with it. But seriously- kiddo points for imagination.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Lindsey

    I was surprised at how satisfied I was with this ending when I felt pretty dragged along for most of this story...like when you try coming back to the beach and the waves just tumble you around. But this was more like that spot out from the shore when you just...float. 😎

  15. 5 out of 5

    Zaz

    Confusing last volume, that I didn't really enjoyed. Confusing last volume, that I didn't really enjoyed.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Kayla

    I'm so confused but i love the way they have so little dialogue in this volume. It's all visuals. I'm so confused but i love the way they have so little dialogue in this volume. It's all visuals.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Nour Boukhris

    A good conclusion to this saga . I love love loved it 💓

  18. 5 out of 5

    Chris

    Nice ending. The art throughout the series was great.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Ayen

    4.5 stars I have so many conflicted feelings about this volume and questions I need answered.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Grilled Toast

    Yep. Good ending.

  21. 4 out of 5

    MargReadsManga

    The art in this series is beyond beautiful! I’ve really enjoyed my time reading this mysterious tale. I loved all the testimonies of sea from around the world. They were excellent.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Edward Rathke

    Absolutely fantastic series. It begins very simply and very grounded in the real world. Volume by volume, we slip more into myths and magic and surrealism, only to come back to a world that is very stable and real. It's a very cool effect, showing how the journey changes even the familiarity of the world we know and understand, how the impossible breaks through the veneers of reality and allows us to see the world as if for the first time. What most impresses me about this series is how unconcern Absolutely fantastic series. It begins very simply and very grounded in the real world. Volume by volume, we slip more into myths and magic and surrealism, only to come back to a world that is very stable and real. It's a very cool effect, showing how the journey changes even the familiarity of the world we know and understand, how the impossible breaks through the veneers of reality and allows us to see the world as if for the first time. What most impresses me about this series is how unconcerned it is with direction and purpose. It's trying to tell the story of the universe and so it sprawls and flails, and in this way it becomes magical, beautiful. It's impressive in deceptive and quiet and simple ways. In its simplicity, it manages to say more than it could had it relied more on words and traditional narrative arcs. It begins with a young girl who struggles to find her identity in the world. Most stories would make this a coming of age thing, or lead us through the nebulous nature of teenagedom, cycling through disaffection and heartbreak to give us an emotional core to the fantastic elements. Children of the Sea skips all of that, and I think that's why I love it the way I do. It has a story to tell, and it's a story larger than humanity. It uses science, mythology, surrealism, magic, and anecdotal asides to give us a story that's both ephemeral and eternal, which is an odd and awesome thing to pull off. The final volume is largely told through images with about 150 pages flying by with just a handful of words on them. It's enormous and powerful and surreal and beautiful, and it's the way we need this story to be told.Because some stories can't be told, can't be explained or described with words. We need movement and images, the language of the world and our bodies. And then when it's over, nothing about the world has changed, but everything has changed. I think it's the best example of the fantastic invading and distorting reality and then dissolving to leave us with the reality we began with. But, of course, that reality can never be what it was, because we've seen the cracks in it, the holes, and we know, now, that there are worlds and truths on the otherside, if we can just listen right. This series tackles a lot of ideas I've always been fascinated by, the ones that drive my own fiction, my own worldview. The myths, the science, the silence, the movement, the language of bodies, of the earth, touch, magic, the eternal, the transient--it takes all these things I'm always obsessing over and weaves it into a gorgeous story about the universe and humanity's place in it. Can't recommend this enough. The best kind of fantasy there is. The best kind of story there is. The kind that changes you, even as you stay in one place.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Michael

    270915: previous volume reviews... 230915: possibly the most beautiful art i have seen in graphic work. in extensive depiction of the seas, the waves, the surf, the rain, the typhoon, the vast cloudless sky, the turbulent stormy sky, this is radically other than graphics set in urban worlds. there is some plot in flashbacks, some testimonies of varied ocean mysteries, some marine sciences, but philosophical insistence we humans know only a fraction of all reality... there are beautiful images of t 270915: previous volume reviews... 230915: possibly the most beautiful art i have seen in graphic work. in extensive depiction of the seas, the waves, the surf, the rain, the typhoon, the vast cloudless sky, the turbulent stormy sky, this is radically other than graphics set in urban worlds. there is some plot in flashbacks, some testimonies of varied ocean mysteries, some marine sciences, but philosophical insistence we humans know only a fraction of all reality... there are beautiful images of the aquatic depths, of shadowed fish, of humans, all the varied flora and fauna, from coral reef, deep sea vents, to angelfish, dugongs, sharks, manta rays, dolphins, and especially whales- a sense of this other world, a sense of what even the most careful human examination misses in this experiential knowing, those worlds of myth, of tales, of science from seas to space to cosmological speculations. there are several plots, there is much fantastical marking of characters as receptive or special, at the same time an apocalyptic fear of fish disappearing from the oceans... there is a great section showing destruction of a typhoon, of wind, rain, lightning- but then also a rational explanation of all the good such destruction brings. there is some talk of why Mars and Venus have no oceans- but by sheer number of other worlds there must be other oceans. there is maybe the distraction that everybody has huge eyes, but that is style. you get used to it. that it is hard to tell sometimes who is male and who is female, this is not important. more significant is weirdness of the two boys, but this becomes background and only really strong in the last volume... then the story is told almost entirely in images... great images... this is the art: the refraction patterns underwater, the leafy shadows from the surface forests, sandy beaches, the wavy sense of movement, the rain streaks, the rippling puddles or rain impacts, the snapping sails, the drumming waves on the boats... all of this creates a world much more... 'tactile', sensual in all ways, than most graphics set more in human worlds, almost like you can feel the heat, feel the seabeeze, taste the saltwater, absorb the red amniotic womb and passage of birth... this world is to me much more effective than usual architecture, monsters, mechanical creations, huge explosions and so on. i can see why this was critically lauded, if not bestseller. this is a manga unlike i have ever read before...

  24. 4 out of 5

    Michael

    I won't spoil the end (this is the final volume in the series), but readers should know going into Children of the Sea that there are no clear, simple answers to the mysteries it presents. I'm not always fond of ambiguous endings, especially in a five volume set of books as big and demanding as Children of the Sea, but this one works for a couple of reasons. First of all, Children of the Sea is worth reading if only as a delivery system for Igarashi's beautiful art. He not only has a perfect gra I won't spoil the end (this is the final volume in the series), but readers should know going into Children of the Sea that there are no clear, simple answers to the mysteries it presents. I'm not always fond of ambiguous endings, especially in a five volume set of books as big and demanding as Children of the Sea, but this one works for a couple of reasons. First of all, Children of the Sea is worth reading if only as a delivery system for Igarashi's beautiful art. He not only has a perfect grasp of the anatomy of sea creatures, he's also able to show underwater light patterns and communicate the vast depths of the ocean using nothing but black ink on white paper. He does this for page after page, pulling readers into his world with the sheer force of the imagery. And that's the second reason the story's ambiguity works. Whatever the scientific or mystical explanations for why things happen in the series, what's important is the connection between the main characters and the sea. The reason for the connection isn't as important as the connection itself, and Igarashi proves it by forming the same connection between reader and story. I don't have to completely understand it to feel it.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Charliesabers

    The series as a whole is good. The story is interesting, deep and thought provoking, and weaves a fascinating tale about the origin of life, death and everything in between. I did not particularly like the main cast. They receive a bit of development, but are mostly there as vehicles for the story. Maybe Ruka, her mom, Anglade and Dehdeh could be considered the best of the bunch. The pacing is kind slow, but not in a bad way. I definitely was actively finding time to read it, but it is no page t The series as a whole is good. The story is interesting, deep and thought provoking, and weaves a fascinating tale about the origin of life, death and everything in between. I did not particularly like the main cast. They receive a bit of development, but are mostly there as vehicles for the story. Maybe Ruka, her mom, Anglade and Dehdeh could be considered the best of the bunch. The pacing is kind slow, but not in a bad way. I definitely was actively finding time to read it, but it is no page turner like Pluto or MW. The one thing I loved the most about this series is the AMAZING art. Many a frame from these books could be shown on a museum. It looks natural, organic, and the depictions of sea flora and fauna are amazingly detailed and full of life. I definitely recommend the series for the art and smart concept alone, but it could've used a bit more exposition to clear up a few confusing plot points.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Abe Underhill

    This series is unlike anything I've ever read! The tone and atmosphere kept me spellbound as the story unfolded throughout all five volumes. Each character is unique and easily recognizable. The illustrations of sea creatures are so life like and show a deep appreciation for the natural world. The mystical tale is not forced on the reader but invites interpretation as it proceeds, often with long stretches of wordless panels that give time for meditation. After finishing this story, I want to go This series is unlike anything I've ever read! The tone and atmosphere kept me spellbound as the story unfolded throughout all five volumes. Each character is unique and easily recognizable. The illustrations of sea creatures are so life like and show a deep appreciation for the natural world. The mystical tale is not forced on the reader but invites interpretation as it proceeds, often with long stretches of wordless panels that give time for meditation. After finishing this story, I want to go back and read the full saga again to get a better feel for its scope but also to spend more time in this beautiful, mysterious setting. Rather than experiencing simple escapism, I found my view of Reality stretched by this wonderful manga epic. Thank you Daisuke Igarashi!

  27. 4 out of 5

    Holly Letson

    What the hell did I just read?!? I cannot make much sense of this, and I suppose that is because I have not read the other 4 volumes of this series. Also, the one I read, from Edelweiss, was only 124 pages, not 336 like Goodreads says, so I believe it was just a preview, not the complete volume. I would, indeed, like to read the other 4 volumes, since this caught my interest. I want to know what all lead up to this. ----------------------------- This volume was provided to me as an eBook by VIZ M What the hell did I just read?!? I cannot make much sense of this, and I suppose that is because I have not read the other 4 volumes of this series. Also, the one I read, from Edelweiss, was only 124 pages, not 336 like Goodreads says, so I believe it was just a preview, not the complete volume. I would, indeed, like to read the other 4 volumes, since this caught my interest. I want to know what all lead up to this. ----------------------------- This volume was provided to me as an eBook by VIZ Media, via Edelweiss, in exchange for an honest review. All opinions expressed here are my own.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Mikael Kuoppala

    Daisuke Igarashi’s “Children of the Sea” draws to a close with an ending that suits the series very well. Initially, I was expecting fascinating sci-fi answers to all the questions this enigmatic tale posed, but the completely opaque ending we receive is perfectly in tune with the bottomless sense of mystery that took over the series after the first few volumes. We don’t get fascinating scientific speculation, but we get to taste the immensity of the universe through pages of silent, contemplativ Daisuke Igarashi’s “Children of the Sea” draws to a close with an ending that suits the series very well. Initially, I was expecting fascinating sci-fi answers to all the questions this enigmatic tale posed, but the completely opaque ending we receive is perfectly in tune with the bottomless sense of mystery that took over the series after the first few volumes. We don’t get fascinating scientific speculation, but we get to taste the immensity of the universe through pages of silent, contemplative beauty. This volume was a meditative experience, and one that reached unconventional levels of tone and wonder.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Travis

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. There is nothing distinctly worse about this volume as compared to others in the series; in fact, it is full of some really gorgeous illustrations of sea life that are quite enjoyable to view. But it is the concluding volume of the series, and after so much build-up and suggestion of something profound, there is no real explanation of anything, or strong feeling of resolution. I always thought I would dislike the conclusion of this series since it would be mysticism cloaked in pseudo-science, bu There is nothing distinctly worse about this volume as compared to others in the series; in fact, it is full of some really gorgeous illustrations of sea life that are quite enjoyable to view. But it is the concluding volume of the series, and after so much build-up and suggestion of something profound, there is no real explanation of anything, or strong feeling of resolution. I always thought I would dislike the conclusion of this series since it would be mysticism cloaked in pseudo-science, but to not even attempt an explanation seems even worse. Meh. It wasn't a great investment of time, nor of money since I got it from a library, so not worth worrying about.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Lara

    While I loved the pacing and the atmosphere of this series, and the focus on the mysterious aspects of Umi and Sora's origins and of the sea itself, I feel like the series lost itself a bit towards the end. Still, I really enjoyed the friendship formed between Ruka and Umi and how Ruka's relationship with her mother is explored a little in the last couple of volumes. I don't entirely know what Igarashi is actually trying to say with this series, but it was an interesting and thought-provoking re While I loved the pacing and the atmosphere of this series, and the focus on the mysterious aspects of Umi and Sora's origins and of the sea itself, I feel like the series lost itself a bit towards the end. Still, I really enjoyed the friendship formed between Ruka and Umi and how Ruka's relationship with her mother is explored a little in the last couple of volumes. I don't entirely know what Igarashi is actually trying to say with this series, but it was an interesting and thought-provoking read for sure!

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