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Charles Xavier has a dream that one day mutants and humans will be able to live together in peace and understanding. Magneto is a mutant who wishes to dominate the whole of humankind. The X-Men have faced Magneto and mutant peace has triumphed. Now they are forced to combat the hatred of the humans they wish to protect. Collecting: Ultimate X-Men 13-20


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Charles Xavier has a dream that one day mutants and humans will be able to live together in peace and understanding. Magneto is a mutant who wishes to dominate the whole of humankind. The X-Men have faced Magneto and mutant peace has triumphed. Now they are forced to combat the hatred of the humans they wish to protect. Collecting: Ultimate X-Men 13-20

30 review for Ultimate X-Men, Vol. 3: World Tour

  1. 4 out of 5

    Sesana

    This is the best, most interesting thing to come out of Ultimate X-Men so far, with the single exception that I honestly thought the Proteus story went on too long. There's an extended lull in the middle that just didn't work for me. That said, there's finally some really interesting character work, particularly with Colossus and Xavier. Colossus is a much more morally complicated character than the original had been at this point in his personal timeline. He is, after all, a former mafia enforc This is the best, most interesting thing to come out of Ultimate X-Men so far, with the single exception that I honestly thought the Proteus story went on too long. There's an extended lull in the middle that just didn't work for me. That said, there's finally some really interesting character work, particularly with Colossus and Xavier. Colossus is a much more morally complicated character than the original had been at this point in his personal timeline. He is, after all, a former mafia enforcer, so it makes sense that he'd find Xavier's moral code to be somewhat less than convincing. Xavier himself comes across as particularly sanctimonious in this volume, which is, I think, a very valid take on the character. But he also, eventually, shows considerably more self-reflection, something that the 616 version of Xavier was notoriously bad at. Betsy Braddock shows up, briefly, but it's a memorable appearance.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Nicolo

    The third volume of the Ultimate X-Men is Mark Millar’s modern take on the classic Proteus story by Chris Claremont. The changes by Millar take advantage of the rich X-Men mythos since Claremont’s story. In this new form, Proteus is now Charles Xavier’s son with Moira MacTaggert. Moira is still the award-winning gene researcher and Xavier takes on the role of the absentee father. This is not out of character for Xavier; since in the classic X-Men stories, he is also an absentee father to Legion, The third volume of the Ultimate X-Men is Mark Millar’s modern take on the classic Proteus story by Chris Claremont. The changes by Millar take advantage of the rich X-Men mythos since Claremont’s story. In this new form, Proteus is now Charles Xavier’s son with Moira MacTaggert. Moira is still the award-winning gene researcher and Xavier takes on the role of the absentee father. This is not out of character for Xavier; since in the classic X-Men stories, he is also an absentee father to Legion, a mutant with a massive multiple personality disorder who inherits his father’s vast mental gifts. Both sons even share the same first name, David. Betsy Braddock appears in this story as a SHIELD agent. She still has her Asian looks, despite being British and her formidable mental powers. She’s no ninja, like her classic incarnation, but she’s no wallflower either. She is resolute in bringing down the Proteus threat permanently and by any means necessary. Millar didn’t change everything. In the end, it would be Colossus that would kill Proteus. But the original Colossus was a farm boy with a heart of a poet, while the Ultimate Colossus is a Russian Mafia enforcer who has no qualms on using lethal force on bringing down a dangerous mass murderer. Unlike in the original story where Colossus faced a gut wrenching moral and ethical dilemma and massive guilt afterwards, it would be the father, whose principles of non-violence and preference for a peaceful resolution, who would face this attack on his dream. Xavier sees himself and mutants as not only the next step in physical evolution but spiritual as well. He believes that mutants have an evolved capacity to do good and advocates a post-human philosophy of taking the moral high ground, shunning violence. He had been an incapable father; would he be fit to run his surrogate children of X-Men? In the aftermath, Xavier makes an important decision regarding his dream of peaceful co-existence between mutant and human. The art is better here than the second volume. I feel that Chris Bachalo’s art is a suitable fill-in with Adam Kubert’s inability to finish a whole arc of six issues.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Nicky

    This is an improvement on the two previous volumes, where I actually got somewhat more involved in the story. Not so much Colossus’ story, which kind of seemed out of the blue to me — he seemed pretty engaged with the X-Men and Xavier’s plan, and suddenly he… wants to go off and have a normal life, and he’s not sure about the goals of the X-Men? But the story with Xavier’s son has genuine feeling and character development, mostly for Xavier. It takes him being the wise mentor to being a guy who c This is an improvement on the two previous volumes, where I actually got somewhat more involved in the story. Not so much Colossus’ story, which kind of seemed out of the blue to me — he seemed pretty engaged with the X-Men and Xavier’s plan, and suddenly he… wants to go off and have a normal life, and he’s not sure about the goals of the X-Men? But the story with Xavier’s son has genuine feeling and character development, mostly for Xavier. It takes him being the wise mentor to being a guy who can really fuck up on his own account, too. I wish he wasn’t quite so all-knowing at times, but I guess that’s the problem with your character being a telepath. I’m not so sure about the Gambit storyline; I recall enjoying the character in an animated series or something, but how he’s supposed to be getting by in a world that hates mutants while so blatantly displaying his abilities, I don’t know. And I know the whole Cajun background is an important part of Gambit, but man, is his dialogue ever difficult to parse. That whole section isn’t much connected to the rest of the book, either… Still, more enjoyable than the first two volumes, I think. Originally posted here.

  4. 5 out of 5

    James DeSantis

    Man it's been so long since I oringally read this, I was probably only around 13 or so when this first came out. Knowing more about the history of the X-Men I actually really enjoyed this volume. This starts off a two parter of Gambit and his adventures as a bum. This is mostly about him protecting a little girl from pieces of shit on the street. Then the main story, World Tour, is about Xavier taking his group of X-Men around the world while promoting his new book. Then, out of nowhere, we focu Man it's been so long since I oringally read this, I was probably only around 13 or so when this first came out. Knowing more about the history of the X-Men I actually really enjoyed this volume. This starts off a two parter of Gambit and his adventures as a bum. This is mostly about him protecting a little girl from pieces of shit on the street. Then the main story, World Tour, is about Xavier taking his group of X-Men around the world while promoting his new book. Then, out of nowhere, we focus on David who is Xavier's son. If you didn't know, and back then I didn't, David (who also is known as Legion) is EXTREMELY powerful mutant. And so the X-Men must face him but David ain't playing around. The pacing is insane here, with plenty of storylines all being told at once. I also loved the action here, very high end and exciting. Watching David do horrible things to each of the X-Men was scary and fun. I also think the ending was really well told and helped build Magneto and Xavier relationship. I will say the worst part was the unnecessary focus on woman getting half naked or clothes ripped off. I didn't need a Psylock bra shot at all here. But overall, this was pretty fun. I can see why I enjoyed this as much as I did as a teenager. A 4 out of 5.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Asher Klassen

    In many ways, the main body of the story exemplifies Millar's skill in character development. As I read I cannot help but blend this tale with Joss Whedon's run of Astonighins X-Men; where Whedon took the character of Kitty Pryde to levels we'd never seen before, Millar is developing Piotr Rasputin to be much more than a steel strongman. He has a dark side to him that doesn't fit the ideal of what the X-Men are supposed to be. In some ways he's more like Wolverine than Charles Xavier. It's inter In many ways, the main body of the story exemplifies Millar's skill in character development. As I read I cannot help but blend this tale with Joss Whedon's run of Astonighins X-Men; where Whedon took the character of Kitty Pryde to levels we'd never seen before, Millar is developing Piotr Rasputin to be much more than a steel strongman. He has a dark side to him that doesn't fit the ideal of what the X-Men are supposed to be. In some ways he's more like Wolverine than Charles Xavier. It's interesting to take this Colussus and put him in the relationship Whedon developed with Shadowcat. It's one of the many joys of having two stellar writers work with the same characters. All that said, my favourite part of this volume wasn't, in fact, the main story. My favourite part was Millar's introduction of Remy LeBeau, later to be known as Gambit. The writing of Remy's New Orleans "Yat" accent is beautifully executed. Millar takes the reader right to the heart of the character, an escalating story of passion and heart culminating in one chilling frame and the words, "The power is in me." This is hands down the best treatment of the Gambit character I've ever seen. Cheers to you, Mr. Millar.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Mersini

    I wasn't really feeling it till the introduction of Gambit and my heart melted. It's literally the only reason this one's getting 4 stars. I wasn't really feeling it till the introduction of Gambit and my heart melted. It's literally the only reason this one's getting 4 stars.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Krystl Louwagie

    This volume didn't pull me in as much as the first volume, I find Storm a bit annoying with her shallow girly-girl-ness, glad to see Gambit, but the story seemed weak and over done, though I did enjoy the focus on Charles and I always love the Proteus storyline, because I love Proteus, but as I recently read the original Proteus storyline, I thought that was was more devastating for some reason-especially how it affected Wolverine. Still enjoyable, but the whole line paled a little bit next to t This volume didn't pull me in as much as the first volume, I find Storm a bit annoying with her shallow girly-girl-ness, glad to see Gambit, but the story seemed weak and over done, though I did enjoy the focus on Charles and I always love the Proteus storyline, because I love Proteus, but as I recently read the original Proteus storyline, I thought that was was more devastating for some reason-especially how it affected Wolverine. Still enjoyable, but the whole line paled a little bit next to the X-Factor I've been reading lately. It is fun to see Colossus portrayed as gay, though (well, he's not out yet, but, it's there).

  8. 4 out of 5

    Todd

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. I had forgotten that they had played the David card so early on. HE's obviously very different here in the Ultimate Universe. I'd also forgotten about Psylocke as she was so quickly killed after her first appearance. This is still a great volume. The Professor finally waivers at least a little bit about what he's doing. The first shred of humanity. The Beast and Storm romance is so sad. I hate that Beast is willing to throw the relationship away because he can't be sure that Charles hasn't messed I had forgotten that they had played the David card so early on. HE's obviously very different here in the Ultimate Universe. I'd also forgotten about Psylocke as she was so quickly killed after her first appearance. This is still a great volume. The Professor finally waivers at least a little bit about what he's doing. The first shred of humanity. The Beast and Storm romance is so sad. I hate that Beast is willing to throw the relationship away because he can't be sure that Charles hasn't messed with Storm's head. There are some early hints at Colossus' later revelation in this story. I don't remember when I started picking up on it the first time, but it might've been here.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Zach Danielson

    The quality starts to decline after two decent volumes, most recently Ultimate X-Men, Vol. 2. Unfortunately, it's gonna get worse (in Ultimate X-Men Vol. 4: Hellfire & Brimstone) before it gets better. The quality starts to decline after two decent volumes, most recently Ultimate X-Men, Vol. 2. Unfortunately, it's gonna get worse (in Ultimate X-Men Vol. 4: Hellfire & Brimstone) before it gets better.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Kimberly

    I am really enjoying this series. Plus we get an intro for one of my favorite X-Men, Gambit :) It's funny to see storylines in this series that sort of line up with the movies. Only they are way cooler in the comic. I'm excited to see who else we will get introduced to in the next comics. I am really enjoying this series. Plus we get an intro for one of my favorite X-Men, Gambit :) It's funny to see storylines in this series that sort of line up with the movies. Only they are way cooler in the comic. I'm excited to see who else we will get introduced to in the next comics.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Jeneé

    Well the story was pretty interesting. But I wasn't too wild about how the art randomly changed half way through. It got really cartoony and just wasn't as good as Kuberts art. Well the story was pretty interesting. But I wasn't too wild about how the art randomly changed half way through. It got really cartoony and just wasn't as good as Kuberts art.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Steve

    Wow, that was a real drop from the first two volumes.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Adam Stone

    This was an emotionally confusing read. The issues are slightly out of order, to hide the fact that Chuck Austen writes an almost textbook forgettable origin story for a character that we might not ever see again, and putting it at the beginning of the book probably would have cut sales in half. Instead the book opens with what might be Mike Millar's best issue of any of his Ultimate books: an essay from the persepctive of Charles Xavier about what he's actually trying to accomplish. The text is i This was an emotionally confusing read. The issues are slightly out of order, to hide the fact that Chuck Austen writes an almost textbook forgettable origin story for a character that we might not ever see again, and putting it at the beginning of the book probably would have cut sales in half. Instead the book opens with what might be Mike Millar's best issue of any of his Ultimate books: an essay from the persepctive of Charles Xavier about what he's actually trying to accomplish. The text is in the margins of the page, while Kubert does tight, small panels, packed with cinematic goodness. The essay is breifly interrupted by Millar's best plot twist of the run, as revealed by Charles to one of his students. It's paced well, and beautifully drawn. The arc that follows is a well-plotted and laid out retelling of the Proteus storyline that suffers from being about an issue too long. It's never terrible, but it does fall just short of great. The Colossus and Iceman stories within this arc are some of Millar's best character work. And having Chris Bachalo fill in for Adam Kubert worked really well for me. Austen's story is, as previously mentioned, textbook bad. Its intent and concept: Gambit is a charming rogue who is forced to become a hero to save a young girl whose parents died, could be ok in a better writer's hands. Unfortunately, every stereotype, every emotional manipulation, every sotrytelling cliche you can imagine is packed into this. And while Millar's Ultimates work is inconsistent, it's not trite. Also, why are we experiencing Gambit's origin story? He's not in any of the previous issues, nor is he in the next storyline. It's been a while since I've read through The Ultimate Universe, but I don't recall him showing up at all. I still recommend this for X-Men fans, or people just curious about the Ultimate Universe. The first issue really is excellent, and I think the plot changes and the art make this version of the Proteus story superior to the original. Just ... just put the book down before you get to the Gambit origin. It's totally unimportant and uninspiring.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Adam

    This was another good and enjoyable entry in this series. I liked how it showed the various characters (especially Professor X) questioning both their motives and their efficacy, and I felt like that brought a lot of depth to them and their motivations. The generally mature content continues to elevate the stories to more enjoyable levels than previous X-Men comics as well. And finally, I liked the last story about Gambit and some of his origins. The artwork continued to be great as well, even t This was another good and enjoyable entry in this series. I liked how it showed the various characters (especially Professor X) questioning both their motives and their efficacy, and I felt like that brought a lot of depth to them and their motivations. The generally mature content continues to elevate the stories to more enjoyable levels than previous X-Men comics as well. And finally, I liked the last story about Gambit and some of his origins. The artwork continued to be great as well, even though I didn't really appreciate the one to two "chapters" (issues) in the middle that were with a different artist, still it was great overall. Overall, a very enjoyable book that makes me happy to continue reading this series!

  15. 5 out of 5

    Lauren

    Starting out with a quick two-shot standalone introducing Gambit to the Ultimate universe (and also some of the most enh line art by Esad Ribic), the "World Tour" arc takes us a little deeper into Colossus' character and also reminds us what a dick Xavier can be by making the X-Men's next adventure be to track down his abandoned son, David, before he destroys half the world in an "Ultimate" take on Claremont's Proteus arc. Thankfully, outside of introducing Betsy "Psylocke" Braddock to the story Starting out with a quick two-shot standalone introducing Gambit to the Ultimate universe (and also some of the most enh line art by Esad Ribic), the "World Tour" arc takes us a little deeper into Colossus' character and also reminds us what a dick Xavier can be by making the X-Men's next adventure be to track down his abandoned son, David, before he destroys half the world in an "Ultimate" take on Claremont's Proteus arc. Thankfully, outside of introducing Betsy "Psylocke" Braddock to the storyline, Millar keeps the X-Men roster the same to allow for better character development. Adam Kubert's pencil work really hits its stride between issues 15 and 17 with some really awesome art: just in time to be replaced with Chris Bachalo who makes the X-Men look like they belong in an episode of Undergrads. Three stars for an engaging storyline that improves on the previous volumes, but the art takes a hit halfway through and a less attractive Gambit I've never seen.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Nancy

    Nice little story and it shows even Professor Xavier can have doubts. I loved the cameo of Stan Lee. Even hiding in a graphic novel his presence is there. I will leave it for other readers to find it. The artwork is interesting because it is showing these characters as teens. Something I had not seen growing up reading the comics. It was a good story that examines the mistakes we can make in the past and how they affect our present. Sometimes the help you need is not what you think or from where Nice little story and it shows even Professor Xavier can have doubts. I loved the cameo of Stan Lee. Even hiding in a graphic novel his presence is there. I will leave it for other readers to find it. The artwork is interesting because it is showing these characters as teens. Something I had not seen growing up reading the comics. It was a good story that examines the mistakes we can make in the past and how they affect our present. Sometimes the help you need is not what you think or from where you think it will be from.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Charles

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Stuff I Read – Ultimate X-Men #13-20 So here, I guess, is where the series finally attempts to confront the failings of the Professor, here in the form of his son, the Ultimate version of Proteus. Proteus basically is messed up because Professor X abandoned him and his mom, and went off to form his own mutant family, trying his best to forget about his former, human family entirely. And so Proteus tries his best to show the Professor the error of his ways, and does this by killing a lot of humans Stuff I Read – Ultimate X-Men #13-20 So here, I guess, is where the series finally attempts to confront the failings of the Professor, here in the form of his son, the Ultimate version of Proteus. Proteus basically is messed up because Professor X abandoned him and his mom, and went off to form his own mutant family, trying his best to forget about his former, human family entirely. And so Proteus tries his best to show the Professor the error of his ways, and does this by killing a lot of humans, ruining the Professor’s reputation and book tour in the process. Meanwhile Colossus has a crisis of faith and returns to Russia before returning. Oh, and at the end there is a Gambit story thrown in for good measure. I must say, I started to hope that with Proteus and the Professor finally being shown as a deeply flawed individual, to the point where he comes across as extremely arrogant and heartless. He freely admits this, as he relates how his family was a burden to his mighty mutantness and how he loved his son like a pet, but nothing more. And really, that seems to be the way he sees others, as so far beneath him that he cannot really feel anything for them beyond condescension. On top of that, we are shown that Colossus leaves because he does not feel right about what Xavier is doing. He wants to be more honest with himself, and actually live amongst humans instead of set away in Xavier’s fantasy. Here the art jumps around a lot more than in the first two arcs, and as such it took away a bit from my enjoyment of these issues, because I want consistency within arcs and here it was a bit all over. Beyond that, though, I am further stuck at what I am supposed to take away from the story. Colossus leaves, but returns because, apparently, he recognizes that being a superhero means that he cannot be a normal person. But this doesn’t seem to justify him returning with Scott and Jean. The only real reason we are given to why he can’t be a hero but also live at home is that perhaps he buys into the whole “you are a mutant and better than everyone else” logic, as he does respond to a military guy when asked if he can save a submarine by saying something like if Colossus cannot do it, no one can. And he does do it, so I guess it proves that he is better? This continues to be my main problem with the series, because it has us identify with mutants, who used to be analogies for minorities, for African Americans or gays or whatever minority was around at the time. And so the mission statement for the original X-Men was to strive for equality and compassion and understanding. Ultimate X-Men does not try to draw the analogy between mutants and minorities is dropped entirely and instead mutants are the next stage of evolution, and don’t really strive for equality. Instead they are trying to lead humanity and mutantkind into some sort of future that is better than the one controlled solely by humanity. They do not want to integrate into human society, but to integrate humans into a post-human world. That is what they call it, post-human. They are, in effect, the kinds of villains that the original X-Men fought. Where Professor X used to be about peaceful cooperation and shared progress, the new Professor X is about peaceful dominance and mutants taking their rightful place of directions of the world. And at the end, once Proteus has been defeated, Professor X has a bit of a crisis of confidence and wants to shut down the school and let things play out as they might. He see, or at least claims to see, that he has been arrogant. But really he is saying that he wants to feel guilty and punish himself but doesn’t really feel guilty. He still knows he is right but needs to appear to be humble to keep his own illusion of his dream intact. Because what changes his mind and gets him to step back into his role and leader of everything? The mind wiped Magneto bought tickets to his lecture. That’s it. In the biggest ego stroke of all time, Xavier sees Magneto “change” (because really the change is that he had his MIND WIPED), and assumes that he is doing the right thing again. Because if mind wiping Magneto works, who couldn’t it work on. Just think, a world where violence isn’t necessary because you can just alter people’s minds to make them not violent any more. Now, correct me if I’m wrong, but A Clockwork Orange kind of addressed that idea. So all I get out of this is that Xavier would think that brainwashing people to be nonviolent would be okay because it is violence that is the problem and not, say, believing that one group of people has the right and authority to brainwash other people to make them “better” than they were before. I still can’t get past that, because it seems to contrary to what the X-Men stand for in the regular Marvel Universe. Which, again, says some pretty disturbing things about what this title is saying about the present day. Is this what people believe is right and heroic now? Is this dystopian, mutant run future really the best we can do? Certainly the series no possible other option, only a choice between Xavier’s control or Magneto’s violence. Personally, I want to think there are more choices than that, and am waiting for a new option to be posited by the series. Until then, this installment merits a 6.5/10.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Dave

    With this volume, Mark Millar and the art team riff on a classic X-Men story. The end result is a pretty solid story which puts Professor Xavier under the microscope, exposing the deep, deep flaws of his character and tackling them head on. Miller's cynicism and pop culture references can be a bit much at points, but on the whole this is pretty affecting work. With this volume, Mark Millar and the art team riff on a classic X-Men story. The end result is a pretty solid story which puts Professor Xavier under the microscope, exposing the deep, deep flaws of his character and tackling them head on. Miller's cynicism and pop culture references can be a bit much at points, but on the whole this is pretty affecting work.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Jim

    There was something a little sappy about this volume, and a little troubling about how the female characters are portrayed in their love interests, as well as niggling weaknesses among several of the characters, including Charles, that made it less than satisfying. Still, I enjoy the characters and the art.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Marloges

    If it wasn't for the Gambit story I would rate this lower, since I didn't really care about the Proteus story and disliked the art and a few of those chapters. The Gambit story however was one of the most touching ones I've read in this universe so far. If it wasn't for the Gambit story I would rate this lower, since I didn't really care about the Proteus story and disliked the art and a few of those chapters. The Gambit story however was one of the most touching ones I've read in this universe so far.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Caleb Abel

    There was a weird change in the artwork for two issues when someone else took over for Adam Kubert, but that was my biggest complaint. The story was a clear rehash of an old X-Men plot which are my least favorite stories in the Ultimate lines, but it was really quite good still.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Natalie

    I didn't know that Professor X had another son? Is he supposed to be his son? It was interesting to read but confusing at first because I thought he was supposed to be Legion. I didn't know that Professor X had another son? Is he supposed to be his son? It was interesting to read but confusing at first because I thought he was supposed to be Legion.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Adrian Ayala

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. The ending was sad and the a bit emotional near the end.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Ekenedilichukwu Ikegwuani

    this one feels less rushed and a lot more complex than the previous story arcs! i like it

  25. 5 out of 5

    Leila Anani

    Ultimate X-Men seems to be going from strength to strength. This third instalment takes the Proteus story and puts its own modern stamp onto the story making Charles the absentee dad who sets off the mutation in his son. As well as the Proteus story we get a solo Gambit adventure were the smart takling street hustler has to forgo a hot date to save a little girl who's parents have been murdered. This one has a very strong story and excellent artwork. What I particularly like is the way it blurs t Ultimate X-Men seems to be going from strength to strength. This third instalment takes the Proteus story and puts its own modern stamp onto the story making Charles the absentee dad who sets off the mutation in his son. As well as the Proteus story we get a solo Gambit adventure were the smart takling street hustler has to forgo a hot date to save a little girl who's parents have been murdered. This one has a very strong story and excellent artwork. What I particularly like is the way it blurs the lines between good and evil - which is beautifully done with the characters of Charles and Magneto. The X-Men, just as much as the reader question just how good the professor really is - Here he's seen as an absentee dad, bad husband and willing to manipulate people's heads to get what he wants - he's practically lobotomised Magneto! This is a particularly strong volume for Colossus as well as he walks out feeling unappreciated. Huge thumbs up here, I was a bit sceptical about the reinvention of the characters for Ultimate X-Men, but this volume put all my fears to rest. Great stuff.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Edward Cheer

    Today is a historic day for me. It's the day that I read an actually enjoyable Mark Millar comic. This is probably his best comic, though I'm not entirely sure. Yeah, there are plot holes as usual. And some story inconsistencies (Like Colossus' almost immediate change of heart). But for something that delves into the past of Professor X, and makes you question his reliability, to the point where even he questions it, is a remarkable feat. It's much better written than the previous two entries. Th Today is a historic day for me. It's the day that I read an actually enjoyable Mark Millar comic. This is probably his best comic, though I'm not entirely sure. Yeah, there are plot holes as usual. And some story inconsistencies (Like Colossus' almost immediate change of heart). But for something that delves into the past of Professor X, and makes you question his reliability, to the point where even he questions it, is a remarkable feat. It's much better written than the previous two entries. There's a cringe-worthy line here and there, but it's a definite improvement. That and the little story about Gambit was a nice touch. It just shows that a good story doesn't have to have "freaking" every two seconds. You need to highlight the characters- make their decisions, the personalities, and their histories matter to the story. Of course, Millar didn't recognize this, as he went on later to write "Wanted" and "Kick-A**", but I appreciate this comic nonetheless.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Amanda

    This series has been a really great introduction to the X-Men. I knew next to nothing going into this, so it was really good to get more of an introduction. the story is really engaging! there's been a lot of really good plot twists that I've been really liking. I have some complaints about the art though. All of the women are wearing clothes, that honestly? I know no one that would wear them, modesty-wise. it makes me feel like the authors of the comic don't care about women's real purpose there This series has been a really great introduction to the X-Men. I knew next to nothing going into this, so it was really good to get more of an introduction. the story is really engaging! there's been a lot of really good plot twists that I've been really liking. I have some complaints about the art though. All of the women are wearing clothes, that honestly? I know no one that would wear them, modesty-wise. it makes me feel like the authors of the comic don't care about women's real purpose there - to be awesome, well-developed, engaging characters. this is kind of demeaning to me as a girl. but overall, I really did enjoy this. a really engaging story and the characters are well developed so far.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Matej

    The third volume of the Ultimate X-men still has a lot of potential, but unfortunately at this point in the series I do not like it as much as I just want to see what happens. The plot is interesting and David is a rather good villain, but the fact that X-men are so easily persuaded to change their minds throughout the volume is the main reason for the mediocre rating. I didn't like the art in few issues that were done by another artist, but the rest of the art is great and it still fits the story The third volume of the Ultimate X-men still has a lot of potential, but unfortunately at this point in the series I do not like it as much as I just want to see what happens. The plot is interesting and David is a rather good villain, but the fact that X-men are so easily persuaded to change their minds throughout the volume is the main reason for the mediocre rating. I didn't like the art in few issues that were done by another artist, but the rest of the art is great and it still fits the story rather well. I am going to give it a shot for one more volume and then see if I will continue with this series.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Andrew Christman

    Profesor X is a real person and he has skeletons in his closet! What a refreshing arc. This one particularly focuses on telepaths, a skill that is taken WAY too lightly in any piece of sci-fi or fantasy. In this case, Xavier's mind bending influence casts doubt within the X-Men when Proteus shows up and the team realizes that their surrogate father has the potential to be a dead beat dad. I won't spoil anything, but this arc continues to explore the theme of violence and if it can be used for a g Profesor X is a real person and he has skeletons in his closet! What a refreshing arc. This one particularly focuses on telepaths, a skill that is taken WAY too lightly in any piece of sci-fi or fantasy. In this case, Xavier's mind bending influence casts doubt within the X-Men when Proteus shows up and the team realizes that their surrogate father has the potential to be a dead beat dad. I won't spoil anything, but this arc continues to explore the theme of violence and if it can be used for a greater good. A fantastic, big question, thinking man's comic!

  30. 4 out of 5

    Kendra Mikols

    I really liked this volume. It introduced us to Xavier's crazy son who I had no idea how they were going to beat (but of course I knew they would because they are the x-men), and it introduced us to Gambit, one of my favorite characters. I had been on the fence about him since his dialogue is hard to understand but hey his power is cool and he risked his life to save a poor little girl he had just met so he's cool in my book. Overall , a good read I really liked this volume. It introduced us to Xavier's crazy son who I had no idea how they were going to beat (but of course I knew they would because they are the x-men), and it introduced us to Gambit, one of my favorite characters. I had been on the fence about him since his dialogue is hard to understand but hey his power is cool and he risked his life to save a poor little girl he had just met so he's cool in my book. Overall , a good read

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