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The Post-Church Christian: Dealing with the Generational Baggage of Our Faith

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A Baby Boomer and a Millennial... a father and a son... a conversation about the church... a misunderstanding waiting to happen... right?  Drawing on experience in missions, pastoral work, and higher education-Moody Bible Institute president, Paul Nyquist, and his son, Carson Nyquist, will lead us on an honest, thoughtful, and dangerous expedition toward The Disconnect. Th A Baby Boomer and a Millennial... a father and a son... a conversation about the church... a misunderstanding waiting to happen... right?  Drawing on experience in missions, pastoral work, and higher education-Moody Bible Institute president, Paul Nyquist, and his son, Carson Nyquist, will lead us on an honest, thoughtful, and dangerous expedition toward The Disconnect. That space, often filled with awkward silences and clenched jaws, that exists between the two largest generations in our world today. The differences are myriad. Millennials value: Raw reality. Authenticity. A missional focus. Questioning everything. Community living. Contentment with ambiguity-both scripturally and morally. Boomers value: Doctrinal purity and clarity. Traditional values. Consumerism. Corporate Ladder Climbing. Bigger is Better. Evangelism of the Lost. Classic lines of authority. Rather than judging each other on the culture we come from-this book will open a dialogue between generations that will have a great effect on churches, ministries, businesses, and families. Both generations will be heard-but will both listen?


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A Baby Boomer and a Millennial... a father and a son... a conversation about the church... a misunderstanding waiting to happen... right?  Drawing on experience in missions, pastoral work, and higher education-Moody Bible Institute president, Paul Nyquist, and his son, Carson Nyquist, will lead us on an honest, thoughtful, and dangerous expedition toward The Disconnect. Th A Baby Boomer and a Millennial... a father and a son... a conversation about the church... a misunderstanding waiting to happen... right?  Drawing on experience in missions, pastoral work, and higher education-Moody Bible Institute president, Paul Nyquist, and his son, Carson Nyquist, will lead us on an honest, thoughtful, and dangerous expedition toward The Disconnect. That space, often filled with awkward silences and clenched jaws, that exists between the two largest generations in our world today. The differences are myriad. Millennials value: Raw reality. Authenticity. A missional focus. Questioning everything. Community living. Contentment with ambiguity-both scripturally and morally. Boomers value: Doctrinal purity and clarity. Traditional values. Consumerism. Corporate Ladder Climbing. Bigger is Better. Evangelism of the Lost. Classic lines of authority. Rather than judging each other on the culture we come from-this book will open a dialogue between generations that will have a great effect on churches, ministries, businesses, and families. Both generations will be heard-but will both listen?

30 review for The Post-Church Christian: Dealing with the Generational Baggage of Our Faith

  1. 4 out of 5

    Scott

    Purchased this at the Verge conference from this past weekend on a whim. I'd give this book a "2.5 star" rating if it were possible. "Pretty good." This book is written from the vantage point of a father and son -- boomer & millennial respectively -- and tries to navigate the waters between older and younger generations. It's a short book and could realistically be read in an afternoon. The first half is written from the perspective of a millennial, the second half from a boomer, and concluding Purchased this at the Verge conference from this past weekend on a whim. I'd give this book a "2.5 star" rating if it were possible. "Pretty good." This book is written from the vantage point of a father and son -- boomer & millennial respectively -- and tries to navigate the waters between older and younger generations. It's a short book and could realistically be read in an afternoon. The first half is written from the perspective of a millennial, the second half from a boomer, and concluding thoughts on "where to go from here." There were a few things that were particularly striking to me. 1. It is good for millennials to be discontent with the status quo and want "more" from church -- more authenticity, more community, more activism, etc. However, if not harnessed well, that discontent could easily turn itself into victimization and anti vision with a generation of Christians defining themselves as something that they *aren't*. For a generation that longs for so much authenticity, it's a bit unattractive to adopt a hipster mentality toward our churches. This is where I think Brett McCracken hit the nail on the head. 2. Millennials, like myself, could use a bit more maturation. I think this is most evident in our unwillingness to listen to our parents. This is where Paul Nyquist's section shines: it is full of wisdom that has been reaped from years of ministry. We millennials our doing ourselves a tremendous disservice if we don't listen to our boomer parents. 3. Millennials, we are not victims. If we have been redeemed by Christ, we no longer need to put our pains and struggles on parade. I think this attitude is a downstream effect from the emergent attitudes, but it may bode us well to repent of our victimization and continue to waver the banner of the gospel instead of the banner of antivision. Again, this book wasn't really that bad. I think it only stirred up some thoughts that have bothered me for a while as a young evangelical observing other young evangelicals.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Sarah

    I believe that this is an important conversation for the church in the west to be having right now - and I love that the one in this book is between a father and son. Not a comprehensive or exhaustive book on the topic by any means, but I am grateful for the two generational perspectives, and the example they both set in seeking to understand and make room for each other. And most importantly, how they engage with ideas about what all of this means for the church of the future. The one thing that I believe that this is an important conversation for the church in the west to be having right now - and I love that the one in this book is between a father and son. Not a comprehensive or exhaustive book on the topic by any means, but I am grateful for the two generational perspectives, and the example they both set in seeking to understand and make room for each other. And most importantly, how they engage with ideas about what all of this means for the church of the future. The one thing that this book couldn’t do, but is so needed, was to give a place and some space for healing the wounds that the post-church Christian has experienced. Despite a conceded effort to not do so, I felt as though that was still breezed past in an effort to get those individuals back to church. Another book for another time maybe, but still so vital on this topic.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Jason Leonard

    This book is unapologetically directed to the millennial who has grown up in a culture of Christianity. If that is you, I imagine this book will help you feel understood and challenge you to consider moving forward with the Church. CONTENT: Though I am neither a millennial nor someone who has grown up in a Christian home, the language here is helpful and the tension discussed on these pages is easily recognizable in the Church. Yes, the millennials are often trying to follow Jesus without the Chur This book is unapologetically directed to the millennial who has grown up in a culture of Christianity. If that is you, I imagine this book will help you feel understood and challenge you to consider moving forward with the Church. CONTENT: Though I am neither a millennial nor someone who has grown up in a Christian home, the language here is helpful and the tension discussed on these pages is easily recognizable in the Church. Yes, the millennials are often trying to follow Jesus without the Church... but they are seriously trying to follow Jesus and they have very real experiences with a Church they have been embarrassed by and alienated from. Yes, the baby-boomer generation has led a time in Church history where morality has seemed to trump relationship... but what they've accomplished in mission and transformation cannot be overstated and they are, in fact, trying to figure out how to welcome the next generations into the Church and pass the baton of leadership on to them. I was most interested in Paul Nyquist's commentary on his own generation - in particular his discussion about the vulnerability and apparent hypocrisy of Church in the past 30 years. It was also interesting to see very little scripture discussed in the first 70 pages (though Scriptural ideas and language were referenced). The use of Scripture provides a sort of passive, background commentary on some of the difference in the generations of Christians. CRITIQUE: This book would be far more accessible if it were written in more of an interview or letter exchange format where the authors go back and forth. I realize that would make it more argumentative, but anyone who isn't a millennial might get a little frustrated with the first 70 pages and the millennials might have a hard time reading the next 50. I wonder if the authors would consider another version, in the future, where they turn this content into more of a back and forth so we can really enter the conversation more. OVERALL: I plan on recommending this to any millennial I hear saying, "I want to follow Jesus... I just don't know how I feel about the Church." Also to anyone wanting to understand the either of these generations and why they "do" Church the way they do. With how easy this book is to read (you'll finish in a couple of hours) and understand, it's a very welcome addition to the literature discussing the future of the Church and world in the hands of the millennials.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Barnabas Piper

    I found this book to be a helpful contribution to the ongoing conversation between Millennials and Baby boomers. Carson Nyquist takes on the tall task of speaking for an entire generation of young people about the church and our concerns. At times I disagreed with him, but that is the nature of speaking in generational generalizations. Over all, he did a good job both speaking to his generation's concerns and commitment to Jesus. I though Paul Nyquist's portion was even stronger. He responds wit I found this book to be a helpful contribution to the ongoing conversation between Millennials and Baby boomers. Carson Nyquist takes on the tall task of speaking for an entire generation of young people about the church and our concerns. At times I disagreed with him, but that is the nature of speaking in generational generalizations. Over all, he did a good job both speaking to his generation's concerns and commitment to Jesus. I though Paul Nyquist's portion was even stronger. He responds with grace and strength to his son and keeps the main thing at the forefront rather than debating points of contention. His wisdom is very helpful for a younger generation and well-worth considering. Over all this book is worth a read, and it goes quick. It is not dense and is fairly short.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Tyler Snavely

    It was very good! I agreed with most of it, but it did it's job well. The point of the book was to inspire and it did just that. It was very good! I agreed with most of it, but it did it's job well. The point of the book was to inspire and it did just that.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Kory

    If you're checking out this book, you're acqainted with the father/son, Boomer/Millennial motif. I'll not belabor it. I'm a Millennial (1985) who usually feels disconnected from the stereotypes of my generation, and Carson's presentation of the Millennial/Church disconnect presented me with an extreme version of this at almost every page turn. While the book creates a credible insight into the genuinely delusional nature of the stereotype Millennial's interpretation of reality, it just makes for If you're checking out this book, you're acqainted with the father/son, Boomer/Millennial motif. I'll not belabor it. I'm a Millennial (1985) who usually feels disconnected from the stereotypes of my generation, and Carson's presentation of the Millennial/Church disconnect presented me with an extreme version of this at almost every page turn. While the book creates a credible insight into the genuinely delusional nature of the stereotype Millennial's interpretation of reality, it just makes for a frustrating read--like you're sitting down to someone's unsolicited opinion posted on their Facebook or Goodreads ;) page--lacking the polish of completed thoughts that usually accompanies an editor's presence before your manuscript goes to print. But really that's what this book means to do, to give the authentic conversation and not the post-production version. So for me, I think the irony here is you have a generation saying "we're not being heard" and when you sit down to attentively read to what they have to say...it's really not worth hearing. Here are some reasons why (specific to the first half of the book) : 1. An overwhelming sense of blame. Everything that is wrong is construed as someone else's fault, and there is very little sense of ability to just deal with difficulty, or to wait your turn, or to shrug off small inconveniences, or to persist through hard things with hard work, or to earn an audience by establishing your credibility over time. Instead, Millennials are consistently imagined as helpless victims of a myriad of middle-class problems. 2. A repeated lack of context. I'm a Millennial who did not have such a frustrating experience with my church that resulted in my departure, so I'm curious what is different for Carson. Unfortunately, he almost never tells stories. "My generation has been frustrated and hurt by a Christian community and subculture that sometimes values perfection over faith." (p.22) Okay. What made you feel hurt? Carson's notes usually contain blame without a name, making the claim seem invalid even to readers who are genuinely interested in hearing him out. 3. Starved for biblical qualification. Remember, the premise is that a "post-Church Christian" still loves Jesus but has problems with the Church. Yet you could count on one hand the number of direct biblical citations used by Carson to establish his case. Without Scriptural foundation, the Millennial position here just seems opinionated and more about hurt feelings than objective perspective. 4. Few solutions. If you're going to critique the flaws of the generation before you, at least come prepared with a justifiable substitute and suggest how we should do things differently. The criticism here doesn't really arrive at a solution. 5. Ironic. It's hard not to feel that the main message here is "Because the previous generation has been unaccepting of Millennials and our ways, our response is to reject them and their ways." Things like these are what makes this a book I don't want others to read. I don't want them to think that this is my generation's blanket perspective. Many of my peers have proven to me that we understand that life is hard, persistence matters, that you have to earn your audience and your reputation, etc. I also don't want impressionable people reading this and thinking that this is a valid perspective to take on as their own personal Gospel. Many people, in small ways, fashion their life after what they read in print without employing critical thinking that asks "Is this true? Is this good?" It's a shame that there are 70 pages of this before getting to a much more centered response from Paul. I expect many readers will put this down before they get there--I almost did. And while the whole arc of the book is somewhat beautiful and touching, the journey to get to that vista will ultimately leave you a little worse for the wear. I'd give Paul's concluding half 4 stars on its own.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Kate Joekel

    Great Conversation on Boomer/Millennial church views At 63, I'm definitely in the boomer generation, but with great sympathy and interest in the millennials. There was a time I felt disenchanted with the way my parents generation 'did church', and have striven to be authentic and work within the church to bring about the change I felt Bible called for. I certainly enjoyed reading this book and learned a lot about how the younger generation thinks and the validity of many of their opinions. Great Conversation on Boomer/Millennial church views At 63, I'm definitely in the boomer generation, but with great sympathy and interest in the millennials. There was a time I felt disenchanted with the way my parents generation 'did church', and have striven to be authentic and work within the church to bring about the change I felt Bible called for. I certainly enjoyed reading this book and learned a lot about how the younger generation thinks and the validity of many of their opinions.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Tessa

    The millennial perspective was barely relatable (i.e., wounds from the church are usually more than your pastor dad disliking your tattoo), and the boomer response was hardly biblical. Maybe the first mistake was chalking it all up to generational differences to start with. A disappointing read.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Noah W

    I recall Voddie Baucham once saying that when people debate "traditional" versus "contemporary" worship they are really comparing Jesus of the 1950's to the Jesus of the 1970's. It appears that the attractional church model is losing to the missional church model. The attractional approach focuses on having a good speaker, music, and programs in order to attract your congregation. Taking the church to the congregation is missional method. I definitely appreciate the missional approach as it encour I recall Voddie Baucham once saying that when people debate "traditional" versus "contemporary" worship they are really comparing Jesus of the 1950's to the Jesus of the 1970's. It appears that the attractional church model is losing to the missional church model. The attractional approach focuses on having a good speaker, music, and programs in order to attract your congregation. Taking the church to the congregation is missional method. I definitely appreciate the missional approach as it encourages Christians to actively engage culture in every area of life. It stresses the Romans 12 directive of living our daily lives as an never ceasing act of worship. This book mentions the devastation that occurs when Christian abdicate taking responsibility for the environment, the arts, and commerce. Defining of "church" They explain the minimum requirements of being a church and not just a super active Bible study which helps prevent people from taking this book and just running with it. 1. The group formally recognizes that it is a church. 2. The group intentionally does what the church is supposed to do Their explanation of "what the church is supposed to do": 1. Gather regularly 2. Appoint qualified leaders 3. Maintain disciplines that mature and protect the church. Namely: Teachings, fellowship, breaking of bread (likely involving both a meal and an observance of the Lord's Supper), and prayer. (Pg. 83) Christian Liberty The book addresses the whole Christians need to smoke, drink, and get tattoos movement. The older Nyquist provides these self-examination questions concerning taking advantage of our Christian "liberty." 1. Will it be helpful for me? (1 Cor. 6:12) 2. Will it dominate me? (1 Cor. 6:12) 3. Will it cause another believer to stumble? (1 Cor. 8:13) 4. Will it build up your neighbor? (1 Cor. 10:23-24) 5. Will it bring God glory? (1 Cor. 10:31) 6. Will it offend an unbeliever? (1 Cor. 10:32-33) Summary The authors do a good job in addressing the fact that the church is in a state of transition. While Bible and the church's commission will never change, the environment in which we are deployed does. This book provides a palatable starting point from which more serious conversation can bloom.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Lawson Hembree

    As the College Ministry Director at a church in a Southern town that is also home to a Christian college, I deal with the results of the friction between baby boomers, millennials, and the church on a frequent basis. I have met many of my fellow millennials who have been “hurt/burned/disillusioned” by the church, so much so that they have given up on it completely. Some of the stories are heartbreaking and valid, but many have withdrawn as the result of generational differences of opinion on wha As the College Ministry Director at a church in a Southern town that is also home to a Christian college, I deal with the results of the friction between baby boomers, millennials, and the church on a frequent basis. I have met many of my fellow millennials who have been “hurt/burned/disillusioned” by the church, so much so that they have given up on it completely. Some of the stories are heartbreaking and valid, but many have withdrawn as the result of generational differences of opinion on what the church should be and do. To them, the church doesn’t feel like home anymore. They still love Jesus, but have become dissatisfied with the church. So the question arises: “Do you need to be a part of the church to follow Jesus?” Enter The Post-Church Christian. This book is based off a series of conversations between a baby boomer father (Paul Nyquist, president of Moody Bible Institute) and his millennial son (Carson Nyquist, a pastor, photographer, and storyteller) about their views of the church. Unlike other books about Christianity, the church, and millennials, The Post-Church Christian is written directly to millennials. In the book, the authors do exactly what the subtitle of the book says by “dealing with the generational baggage of our faith.” Overall, this is a helpful book for Christians of all ages to read. It gives millennials an understanding of where baby boomers are coming from as well as a biblical perspective on what the church is and should do. It also helps baby boomers and church leaders to understand the young people in their church better and how to empower them to make a difference in the local church, the community, and the world. For a full review, check out my blog: "The Post-Christian Church" [Book Review] Disclosure of Material Connection: I received this book free from the publisher. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255: “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”

  11. 5 out of 5

    Randee Baty

    This is definitely a tale of two books. The son, a Millennial, writes the first half and the father, a Boomer, write the second half. The two halves couldn't be more different. I was ready to throw the book away at the end of the first half but the second half really redeemed it. The premise of the book is that there is a basic disconnect between the Millennials and the Boomers. I believe this could be said about any two generations but the son in this book seems to think it is deeper between the This is definitely a tale of two books. The son, a Millennial, writes the first half and the father, a Boomer, write the second half. The two halves couldn't be more different. I was ready to throw the book away at the end of the first half but the second half really redeemed it. The premise of the book is that there is a basic disconnect between the Millennials and the Boomers. I believe this could be said about any two generations but the son in this book seems to think it is deeper between these two than between any other two. As he explains where he believes the Millennials are coming from and why they are leaving the church, he comes across as very arrogant and just as judgmental as he is accusing the older generation of being. He claims his generation wants to be relational but he does not seem to want any type of relationship with the older generation. He makes sweeping generalizations about that are far too broad to be of any real practical help to a local situation. He speaks very negatively of the church as if he could be a follower of Christ and not be part of the church. If local congregations are what he wants to criticize, he should say so, not rail against the church, which includes every believer including him. I can see where he's coming from and I've heard the same issues from people in my church so I know they are real but I've never heard them expressed with such arrogance. The father writes the second half of the book and addresses many of the issues that I thought of as the son was writing. This is the reason it gets 3 stars and not 1. His obvious hope to help bring the younger generation into the church and address their issues really comes through. He gives concise answers to theological problems that are raised by the son. I was impressed by his deep understanding of the problems involved and his willingness to answer them honestly in a very scriptural way. I would not recommend the first part to any of my friends because of the attitude that comes through but I will be using answers provided in the second half to help Millenials in my life come to a deeper understanding of the role they play in the church. This book was a Goodreads giveaway and I appreciated the opportunity to read and review it.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Jacob Schweizer

    I greatly enjoyed reading two different church perspectives; one being from a millennial and the other being from a baby boomer. Surprisingly, being a millennial myself, I disagreed with a good half of what was said from/about the millennial perspective. I believed Paul Nyquist rightly addressed the dangers that this new millennial generation is conjuring, relating to issues of christian liberty and the new popularity of abandoning the church. Nevertheless, young Nyquist speaks blatantly about t I greatly enjoyed reading two different church perspectives; one being from a millennial and the other being from a baby boomer. Surprisingly, being a millennial myself, I disagreed with a good half of what was said from/about the millennial perspective. I believed Paul Nyquist rightly addressed the dangers that this new millennial generation is conjuring, relating to issues of christian liberty and the new popularity of abandoning the church. Nevertheless, young Nyquist speaks blatantly about the real and pressing problems that millennials see, and that the church must face with unavoidance. This book is not written for a millennial or a boomer to gain ammunition against one another; so if that is your intent upon reading please think twice. Prepare to be informed about the clashing of cultures within the church and humbled toward a solution that can only be attained by Christ like love for one another.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Danielle

    This book is a kind of conversation between two pastors, incidentally a father and son, one from the Baby Boomer generation and one from the Millennial generation. They talk about the things in the church that seem to driving younger generations away from formalized Christianity each from their own perspective. It's an interesting concept, but like most books about generational stuff I found myself getting annoyed by sweeping generalizations of this is what it's like for my generation as if ever This book is a kind of conversation between two pastors, incidentally a father and son, one from the Baby Boomer generation and one from the Millennial generation. They talk about the things in the church that seem to driving younger generations away from formalized Christianity each from their own perspective. It's an interesting concept, but like most books about generational stuff I found myself getting annoyed by sweeping generalizations of this is what it's like for my generation as if every single person born in a specific time period is the same. There were definitely some valid points raised, but I'm not sure there were really any answers.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Walt Walkowski

    I believe we need to be having the kinds of conversations like the one that takes place in this book--except that we need to do a better job of it. Millennials bring some worthwhile ideas to the table, and critiques that should be heard, but should also be challenged to root those thoughts in Scripture much better than Carson Nyquist does. The Church has changed and will continue to change, and we must do so to meet the changing needs in our world and our society. But we must make sure, along th I believe we need to be having the kinds of conversations like the one that takes place in this book--except that we need to do a better job of it. Millennials bring some worthwhile ideas to the table, and critiques that should be heard, but should also be challenged to root those thoughts in Scripture much better than Carson Nyquist does. The Church has changed and will continue to change, and we must do so to meet the changing needs in our world and our society. But we must make sure, along the way, that the eternal truth which has been entrusted to us does not change. This is a worthwhile read, though it's frustrating at times.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Bill Welte

    If you are working with millennial s and boomers, this is an important read. If you don't have an open mind, you will never make it through the first chapter. This is a book where you have to work through the whole book before making conclusions. It was very helpful for me to understand the challenges that we face in ministering to the next generation. If you are in leadership -- this is a must read. If you are working with millennial s and boomers, this is an important read. If you don't have an open mind, you will never make it through the first chapter. This is a book where you have to work through the whole book before making conclusions. It was very helpful for me to understand the challenges that we face in ministering to the next generation. If you are in leadership -- this is a must read.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Laura

    Important issues, good advice from both generations but awkward format (first half from millenial viewpoint, second half from boomer, no back and forth) and not a super engaging writing style from either author. I'm too old to be a millennial so it was nice to read one guy's perspective on what that means, related to the church. Important issues, good advice from both generations but awkward format (first half from millenial viewpoint, second half from boomer, no back and forth) and not a super engaging writing style from either author. I'm too old to be a millennial so it was nice to read one guy's perspective on what that means, related to the church.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Judith

    Unfortunately this is a discussion that needs to take place. I rated it "OK" because the topic itself is disturbing. The questions seems to be: How do millenials and boomers relate with humility, embrace each other's strengths and acknowledge each other's weaknesses, and above all honor and exalt Christ and love (and seek to purify) His Bride, the Church? Unfortunately this is a discussion that needs to take place. I rated it "OK" because the topic itself is disturbing. The questions seems to be: How do millenials and boomers relate with humility, embrace each other's strengths and acknowledge each other's weaknesses, and above all honor and exalt Christ and love (and seek to purify) His Bride, the Church?

  18. 4 out of 5

    Jeff Whittum

    Almost a 4 (3.8ish) Good conversation between generations on the good and bad of the boomer church practices. I could identify with some of the millennial's complaints as well as the boomer responses and counter-challenges. Almost a 4 (3.8ish) Good conversation between generations on the good and bad of the boomer church practices. I could identify with some of the millennial's complaints as well as the boomer responses and counter-challenges.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Olivia

    An important read for any millennial who has felt frustrated or disillusioned with the evangelical church. This is an honest read that I kept relating to over and over. I read it in one sitting it was that good. Worth the read.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Isabelle

    I won this book in the giveaway! Can't wait to receive it, and read it! Should be very interesting! :) I won this book in the giveaway! Can't wait to receive it, and read it! Should be very interesting! :)

  21. 4 out of 5

    Barry Peffer

    Excellent read. Helps me understand both my own mindset and the millenials as well. Hope to use that to interact with younger members at church!

  22. 4 out of 5

    Dana

    Within the first few pages I knew this book was directed at me. I can clearly see myself within both perspectives.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Paul Kurtz

    I had high expectations for this book and was very disappointed. A lot of the "millenials" problems with the church seemed to be juvenile and self-centered. I had high expectations for this book and was very disappointed. A lot of the "millenials" problems with the church seemed to be juvenile and self-centered.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Valarie

    I want to buy two copies: one for me to annotate, and one for my church's library. I want to buy two copies: one for me to annotate, and one for my church's library.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Bradley Heck

    Good book. Explains well the difference in transforming to the world and living in it. Our generation is different than the last. Just like the next will be different than ours.

  26. 5 out of 5

    John

  27. 5 out of 5

    Scott

  28. 4 out of 5

    Moody Publishers

  29. 4 out of 5

    Steven

  30. 5 out of 5

    Keith Kirby

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