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The Classical Cookbook

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Marrow Alexandria-style, fish in coriander crust or pancakes with honey and sesame seeds - all types of food are represented here. This is an exploration of Mediterranean cuisine from 750 BC to AD 450 which allows the modern cook to recreate the varied diet of the classical world, from the banquets of the rich elite to the simpler meals of soldiers, farmers and slaves. Tra Marrow Alexandria-style, fish in coriander crust or pancakes with honey and sesame seeds - all types of food are represented here. This is an exploration of Mediterranean cuisine from 750 BC to AD 450 which allows the modern cook to recreate the varied diet of the classical world, from the banquets of the rich elite to the simpler meals of soldiers, farmers and slaves. Translations of the 50 original recipes are followed by a version specially adapted for the modern cook. The book is illustrated throughout with delightful scenes of food, feasting and carousing from wall paintings, mosaics and Greek vases.


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Marrow Alexandria-style, fish in coriander crust or pancakes with honey and sesame seeds - all types of food are represented here. This is an exploration of Mediterranean cuisine from 750 BC to AD 450 which allows the modern cook to recreate the varied diet of the classical world, from the banquets of the rich elite to the simpler meals of soldiers, farmers and slaves. Tra Marrow Alexandria-style, fish in coriander crust or pancakes with honey and sesame seeds - all types of food are represented here. This is an exploration of Mediterranean cuisine from 750 BC to AD 450 which allows the modern cook to recreate the varied diet of the classical world, from the banquets of the rich elite to the simpler meals of soldiers, farmers and slaves. Translations of the 50 original recipes are followed by a version specially adapted for the modern cook. The book is illustrated throughout with delightful scenes of food, feasting and carousing from wall paintings, mosaics and Greek vases.

30 review for The Classical Cookbook

  1. 5 out of 5

    Nathan "N.R." Gaddis

    Had dinner out of here last night. A smashing success! Something tuna steak something lentils something cabbage some barley cakes (upgrade'd to wheat) pungent beyond belief garlic=cheese spread a little olive compote=type thing something we'll just call Classical honey donuts. There's also a pretty sweet cheese=cake recipe in here.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Rachel Hartman

    Io Saturnalia! We've owned this book for years, but I am reminded of it in particular today while I cook our Saturnalia feast out of it. I love this book to death, I really do, but I will just say the recipes are occasionally tricky. It would get five stars as an educational read, but just three as an actual cookbook. Some of the recipes are obvious, easy, and wonderful ("Fish in a Coriander Crust" comes to mind); some, such as the barley rolls I'm making today, require substantial interpretation Io Saturnalia! We've owned this book for years, but I am reminded of it in particular today while I cook our Saturnalia feast out of it. I love this book to death, I really do, but I will just say the recipes are occasionally tricky. It would get five stars as an educational read, but just three as an actual cookbook. Some of the recipes are obvious, easy, and wonderful ("Fish in a Coriander Crust" comes to mind); some, such as the barley rolls I'm making today, require substantial interpretation on the part of the cook. This is our fourth year making these barley rolls, and I believe I finally have the recipe modified to the point where we won't break our teeth on the damn things. Now obviously, ancient cooks didn't write down recipes the way we do today, so the author is already a step or two into interpretation, just by trying to figure out what the ancient cooks meant and DID. But it's totally worth it to go get some of the odder ingredients - asafoetida (available at Indian groceries), rue and catmint (available at the local hippie natural medicine shop), passum (raisin wine, hard to find), and garum (ok, we just use Thai fish sauce). These are flavours that the western palate doesn't experience often, and it's a shame really that they've fallen out of favour, because they're interesting. Salve! And a happy Saturnalia to you and yours!

  3. 4 out of 5

    Alex

    Four stars for the sheer amount of effort that clearly went into this: this is the rare cookbook that goes beyond Apicius. Until I can plant lovage and rue in my own garden, however, I shall have to admire these recipes from afar.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Lenka

    A very good book on everyday life in ancient Greece and Rome with an interesting selection of recipes.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Mills College Library

    641.59495 D137 2012

  6. 5 out of 5

    Julie Isenhower

    The Classical Cookbook is not quite like any book I’ve ever read. Of course it doesn’t tell a chronological story like a true novel, but it doesn’t just list recipes like a regular cook book either. I enjoy and appreciate the format with which Sally Grainger and Andrew Dalby wrote it. They will have a translation of an ancient Greek or Roman recipe and also conveniently give its contemporary equivalent or substitute certain rare ingredients for ones that can be commonly found. But then they go f The Classical Cookbook is not quite like any book I’ve ever read. Of course it doesn’t tell a chronological story like a true novel, but it doesn’t just list recipes like a regular cook book either. I enjoy and appreciate the format with which Sally Grainger and Andrew Dalby wrote it. They will have a translation of an ancient Greek or Roman recipe and also conveniently give its contemporary equivalent or substitute certain rare ingredients for ones that can be commonly found. But then they go further to tell what social classes would have eaten this food (slaves, soldiers, kings, the merchant class, ect.), and whether it was part of everyday live or more of a delicacy. It makes the history seem more real and less like a story when we can see how similar the ancient Greek and Romans were to us today. They ate and had festivals and celebrated as well. It’s surprising to see how similar our actual food is to theirs. They had things like cheesecake and wine, just like we do. In addition to all this, there are large pictures showing scenes from the time depicting banquets and people eating, fishing, ect. It’s refreshing and interesting to get a peek into the daily lives of the ancient Greek and Romans via food.

  7. 4 out of 5

    dejah_thoris

    So, you want to know about ancient Greek or Roman cooking but don't want to read another, more detailed book by Dalby? Or maybe you want to see if you can actually make some of the recipes quoted in one of the other books? The Classical Cookbook is the book for you! Subdivided roughly by era and geography each chapter begins with a brief food history that is followed by several recipes adapted from classic texts each of which is quoted above its corresponding adaptation. Most of the recipes appe So, you want to know about ancient Greek or Roman cooking but don't want to read another, more detailed book by Dalby? Or maybe you want to see if you can actually make some of the recipes quoted in one of the other books? The Classical Cookbook is the book for you! Subdivided roughly by era and geography each chapter begins with a brief food history that is followed by several recipes adapted from classic texts each of which is quoted above its corresponding adaptation. Most of the recipes appear easy to use once you obtain the ingredients and there is a separate introduction explaining how to procure various exotic (to us) herbs and spices. And the recipes represent the variety of ancient Greek and Roman cuisine from main courses to desserts. Plus, you get an interesting sense of how difficult it is to adapt an ancient recipe, usually a list of ingredients with brief indications of cooking methods, to a modern, reproducible equivalent from his co-author's discussions at the start of each one regarding the process. So, if you're interested in food history and actually cooking from ancient recipes, read Dalby's most accessible (cook)book on the subject.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Sidsel Pedersen

    I really should make a shelf for historical cookbooks as I do have quite a few now. This was excellent. I have not tried any of the recipes yet, or I would have scored it higher. It reads very well as a history book on Anicent food history as well as a cook book. The chapter introductions along with the recipe introductions paints a vivid picture of the foods eaten. Many of the recipes are accompanied by quotes from ancient texts and cookbooks which half the entertainment. If you are interested i I really should make a shelf for historical cookbooks as I do have quite a few now. This was excellent. I have not tried any of the recipes yet, or I would have scored it higher. It reads very well as a history book on Anicent food history as well as a cook book. The chapter introductions along with the recipe introductions paints a vivid picture of the foods eaten. Many of the recipes are accompanied by quotes from ancient texts and cookbooks which half the entertainment. If you are interested in ancient everyday history or a reenactor I think this is well worth your time.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Michele

    An excellent historic cook book. Solid history. Author is careful with the reconstructions, explaining what is known, and what is inferred, for each recipe. It focuses primarily on techniques and recipes that originated in ancient Greece and passed on to ancent Rome.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Kouyoum

    A book to reat !

  11. 4 out of 5

    Lindagrifths

  12. 5 out of 5

    Valerie Cullers

  13. 5 out of 5

    Robert Cardwell

  14. 4 out of 5

    Debora Oliver

  15. 5 out of 5

    Jordan

  16. 4 out of 5

    Dorthe

  17. 4 out of 5

    Kara

  18. 4 out of 5

    Bobbie G

  19. 4 out of 5

    Bill Gawne

  20. 4 out of 5

    Jonathan Farley

  21. 5 out of 5

    Gert-Jan

  22. 5 out of 5

    Marina

  23. 5 out of 5

    Daniel Serra

  24. 5 out of 5

    Irene Koutsoukis

  25. 5 out of 5

    Regina Hunter

  26. 4 out of 5

    Chris

  27. 4 out of 5

    Cem Göçer

  28. 4 out of 5

    Tchipakkan

  29. 5 out of 5

    Constanza Gomez

  30. 4 out of 5

    Elisheva

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