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Kingdom Triangle: Recover the Christian Mind, Renovate the Soul, Restore the Spirit's Power

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Western society is in crisis, the result of our culture’s embrace of naturalism and postmodernism. At the same time, the biblical worldview has been pushed to the margins. Christians have been strongly influenced by these trends, with the result that the personal lives of Christians often reflect the surrounding culture more than the way of Christ, and the church’s transfo Western society is in crisis, the result of our culture’s embrace of naturalism and postmodernism. At the same time, the biblical worldview has been pushed to the margins. Christians have been strongly influenced by these trends, with the result that the personal lives of Christians often reflect the surrounding culture more than the way of Christ, and the church’s transforming influence on society has waned.In Kingdom Triangle, J.P. Moreland issues a call to recapture the drama and power of kingdom living. He examines and provides a penetrating critique of these worldviews and shows how they have ushered in the current societal crisis. He then lays out a strategy for the Christian community to regain the potency of kingdom life and influence in the world. Drawing insights from the early church, he outlines three essential ingredients of this revolution:? Recovery of the Christian mind? Renovation of Christian spirituality? Restoration of the power of the Holy SpiritHe believes that evangelical Christianity can mature and lead the surrounding society out of the meaningless morass it finds itself in with humility and vision.


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Western society is in crisis, the result of our culture’s embrace of naturalism and postmodernism. At the same time, the biblical worldview has been pushed to the margins. Christians have been strongly influenced by these trends, with the result that the personal lives of Christians often reflect the surrounding culture more than the way of Christ, and the church’s transfo Western society is in crisis, the result of our culture’s embrace of naturalism and postmodernism. At the same time, the biblical worldview has been pushed to the margins. Christians have been strongly influenced by these trends, with the result that the personal lives of Christians often reflect the surrounding culture more than the way of Christ, and the church’s transforming influence on society has waned.In Kingdom Triangle, J.P. Moreland issues a call to recapture the drama and power of kingdom living. He examines and provides a penetrating critique of these worldviews and shows how they have ushered in the current societal crisis. He then lays out a strategy for the Christian community to regain the potency of kingdom life and influence in the world. Drawing insights from the early church, he outlines three essential ingredients of this revolution:? Recovery of the Christian mind? Renovation of Christian spirituality? Restoration of the power of the Holy SpiritHe believes that evangelical Christianity can mature and lead the surrounding society out of the meaningless morass it finds itself in with humility and vision.

30 review for Kingdom Triangle: Recover the Christian Mind, Renovate the Soul, Restore the Spirit's Power

  1. 4 out of 5

    Sonny

    J.P. Moreland is a highly esteemed, much-published, and gifted evangelical philosopher and apologist. His book, Kingdom Triangle, is a unique book that is a combination of Christian philosophy, apologetics, and spiritual disciplines. The book covers a lot of ground in just 200 pages. The book is divided into two sections. The first assesses the crisis of our age. The second section proposes a solution for the church to meet the crisis: intellectual engagement, spiritual formation, and supernatur J.P. Moreland is a highly esteemed, much-published, and gifted evangelical philosopher and apologist. His book, Kingdom Triangle, is a unique book that is a combination of Christian philosophy, apologetics, and spiritual disciplines. The book covers a lot of ground in just 200 pages. The book is divided into two sections. The first assesses the crisis of our age. The second section proposes a solution for the church to meet the crisis: intellectual engagement, spiritual formation, and supernatural spiritual power. In section one, Assessing the Crisis of Our Age, Moreland explains that we have moved from a biblical worldview to the philosophies of naturalism and postmodernism that now dominate our culture. Naturalism denies the reality of anything outside of what we can touch and see, and postmodernism says there is almost nothing beyond ourselves that we can truly know. These two worldviews rob life of any objective meaning. The result is an “empty self” that is restless, easily distracted, and narcissistic. While the book does not give a full-fledged apologetic against scientific naturalism and postmodernism, it does powerfully demonstrate the intellectual weaknesses of these two worldviews. The second section, Charting a Way Out, deals with a practical solution to the crisis. This section is divided into three parts dealing with what Moreland calls “the Kingdom Triangle.” The first leg of the triangle is the recovery of the Christian mind. Moreland urges us to recognize that Biblical faith is not blind faith; rather it is built on the foundation of knowledge. He argues that spiritual fitness is not exclusively a matter of faith or belief, but is also a matter of knowledge. He tries to bring spiritual knowledge back to the status it had before it was shed through scientism and secularism. It’s a fairly good introduction to epistemology. The second leg of the kingdom triangle addresses the renovation of the soul. Moreland explains that spiritual competence also extends into developing the skills of Christian living through the devotional life or spiritual disciplines. His description of “the empty self” is a clear rebuke of a shallow, apathetic, Christian lifestyle. He provides strategies for developing a deeper Christian lifestyle that is disciplined and strong. The third leg of the triangle is the restoration of the Kingdom’s miraculous power. Moreland’s goal is to inspire Christians to seek and expect the manifestations of God’s Spirit and a life marked by the Spirit’s power. He believes that this dimension of Kingdom living is crucial if we are to respond effectively to the crisis of our time. Moreland’s endorsement of the charismatic element of Christian experience has been controversial; but his argument is biblically sound, combining solid theology, while addressing some common charismatic errors. Moreland’s Kingdom Triangle is an important book. Although challenging at times to read, this book is insightful and very relevant. If read, preached, and applied, the teachings of this book could spark revival and reformation in the Western church. Get yourself a copy and read it.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Jacob Aitken

    This is Moreland's follow-up to his watershed-work "Love your God with all your Mind." The triangle is knowledge/virtue/power, and the book is thus organized. The Crisis: Western world, under the influence over Evolutionary Naturalism (whatever exists can only be known by scientific means), has seen the loss of a real, non-empirical yet accessible body of knowledge. As a result, this world has no objective value. Moreland then runs a brutal critique of naturalism: naturalism cannot account for co This is Moreland's follow-up to his watershed-work "Love your God with all your Mind." The triangle is knowledge/virtue/power, and the book is thus organized. The Crisis: Western world, under the influence over Evolutionary Naturalism (whatever exists can only be known by scientific means), has seen the loss of a real, non-empirical yet accessible body of knowledge. As a result, this world has no objective value. Moreland then runs a brutal critique of naturalism: naturalism cannot account for consciousness, human willing, responsibility, and intrinsic value. Postmodernism is naturalism's shadow. Both deny the reality of objective, non-empirical knowledge. This section is tricky. What is postmodernism? Moreland tends to assume it is relativism, but the French school by and large rejected relativism. Moreland then links it with the Emergent Church. That's one school, perhaps a large one. We will assume that is what postmodernism means at the moment. Moreland quickly disposes of postmodernism, mainly the EC variety. The Solution. 1. The recovery of knowledge. Moreland defines knowledge as justified, true belief. This seems to place him in the classical foundationalist, internalist school. There are difficulties with such an approach, yet when Moreland furthers explains his position, it seems like he is defining knowledge as Warranted belief. He notes that certainty is not always necessary and that knowledge can grow by degrees. He further responds to skepticism by adhering to Thomas Reid's particularism. Throughout this section are excellent technical discussions. 2. Virtue Ethics. He examines the "Empty Self" concept (e.g., the Kardashians) and contrasts it with the ancient understanding of happiness as virtue. This was Christianized into "Eternal Life." 3. Kingdom Power. Here Moreland defends continuationism. He doesn't so much argue the case as present an overwhelming amount of anecdotal evidence. He does point to where both cessationists and continuationists have overreacted to each other. While this chapter is probably weaker on the logical arguments, he does offer an interesting exegetical insight concerning the Gospel of the Kingdom. : the reign and rule of God available in Jesus Christ. God has power over demons, darkness, and disease. Interestingly, this is why hard-line dispensationalists will not sing the praise hymn, "Majesty." One of the lines is "Kingdom Authority." But dispensationalists note that Jesus isn't seated on David's throne. If he were, then the Kingdom has indeed come in power and believers would have access to that power. I'm not arguing for or against Moreland on this point. I do think MacArthur's Strange Fire was a really bad critique and contra the backslapping, fewer and fewer scholars hold to cessationism. Conclusion: This book was as exciting as his prequel. Moreland has effectively destroyed naturalism, which is the worldview of CNN, Oprah, and the Beltway Alliance. I hope he doesn't end up in a FEMA camp. Until then, if you master Moreland's arguments, you too can stand in the gap and put the CNN anchors to route.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Joshua Jacobson

    This book is absolutely astounding. The three pillars of the Faith that he argues for are the same three elements thought to have contributed to the rapid growth of the church in the first century. 1. Well reasoned apologetics. 2. A deep personal transformation and commitment to serving the community. 3. A dependence on the powerful working of the Spirit. Moreland expounds on each and calls the reader to a deeper commitment to each in very practical yet transformational ways. If I were to do noth This book is absolutely astounding. The three pillars of the Faith that he argues for are the same three elements thought to have contributed to the rapid growth of the church in the first century. 1. Well reasoned apologetics. 2. A deep personal transformation and commitment to serving the community. 3. A dependence on the powerful working of the Spirit. Moreland expounds on each and calls the reader to a deeper commitment to each in very practical yet transformational ways. If I were to do nothing but follow his suggestions for an entire year, I would have the deepest and possibly the most profound period of growth in my entire life. I would recommend this book to any Christian wanting to be challenged to grow in their Faith.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Shannon Lewis

    I was prepared to love this book, & maybe that was the problem: it wasn't ANYTHING like I thought it would be, after having read the book's description. Essentially a philosophical critique of postmodernism, more than anything else. Moreland has always been a sharp thinker, but this book missed the mark. I was prepared to love this book, & maybe that was the problem: it wasn't ANYTHING like I thought it would be, after having read the book's description. Essentially a philosophical critique of postmodernism, more than anything else. Moreland has always been a sharp thinker, but this book missed the mark.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Etienne OMNES

    Le but de J.P Moreland est d'encourager et montrer la voie vers la Réforme de notre église. Réussit-il sa mission? Oui sans réserve, de tous les livres qui parlent du sujet, il est celui qui touche le plus juste. Le livre est constitué en deux parties: 1. La crise de notre époque (description du paysage philosophique contemporain) 2. La révolution qu'il propose La partie 1 est très bien faite, mais ceux qui auront déjà lu WL Craig, ou Nancy Pearcey, ou Frank Schaeffer sur le sujet ne seront pas su Le but de J.P Moreland est d'encourager et montrer la voie vers la Réforme de notre église. Réussit-il sa mission? Oui sans réserve, de tous les livres qui parlent du sujet, il est celui qui touche le plus juste. Le livre est constitué en deux parties: 1. La crise de notre époque (description du paysage philosophique contemporain) 2. La révolution qu'il propose La partie 1 est très bien faite, mais ceux qui auront déjà lu WL Craig, ou Nancy Pearcey, ou Frank Schaeffer sur le sujet ne seront pas surpris: une bonne moitié du livre est une description précise, nuancée et complète quoique concise du scientisme et du postmodernisme. Cette partie est bien faite, mais pour moi qui avait déjà lu les auteurs déjà cités, il n'y avait rien de nouveau. On remarquera d'ailleurs une grande continuité avec "Love your god with all your mind". La partie 2 en revanche est de l'or. Il propose une transformation individuelle de chaque croyant selon 3 axes: 1. Reprendre possession de l'intellect chrétien. Cela signifie assumer que la théologie et l'éthique sont tout autant des connaissances que la physique et la chimie. Recouvrir des vertus intellectuelles comme l'honnêteté, la charité intellectuelle, l'ouverture, la loyauté (par opposition au scepticisme) et la tolérance classique (pas antifa) 2. Renouveler la vie intérieure, la vie de l'âme. Cela signifie travailler à sa propre vie de prière et spirituelle : apprendre à joindre la chair des émotions au squelette de la théologie, développer une vraie démarche de disciple, qui vit tout moment de la vie selon la gloire de Dieu 3. Avoir un christianisme "naturellement surnaturel": JP Moreland a évolué d'un cessationnisme strict à une ouverture limitée, puis à ce qu'il appelle une position "troisième vague": charismatique sans excès. Il encourage ardemment ses lecteurs à vivre selon un christianisme ouvert au surnaturel, qui manifeste la vie de Dieu non seulement dans notre intellect et notre âme, mais aussi dans les actes extérieurs. Et il n'y a personne de plus légitime que JP Moreland pour présenter ces idées: c'est un philosophe professionnel, enseignant à Talbot avec William Lane Craig, reconnu de ses pairs. C'est un pasteur au long cours, qui a implanté presque une dizaine d'églises, et qui a eu à coeur l'accompagnement spirituel. C'est un évangéliste aux premières lignes, qui a évangélisé en toutes occasions, grandes ou petites, par des débats académiques ou des tracts dans la rue. Rien de ce qu'il défend ne lui est extérieur, sa défense est sincère et honnête. A la fin de la lecture, je ne peux que dire: je crois que Moreland a bien écrit. C'est effectivement comme cela que l'occident rattrapera l'afrique et l'asie dans le rang des continents où l'évangile se répand.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Esther

    While I don't agree with all of the author's conclusions it was an informative and challenging book to read. Published 11 years ago. While I don't agree with all of the author's conclusions it was an informative and challenging book to read. Published 11 years ago.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Bryan Neuschwander

    June 16, 2011 Moreland begins his book by assessing the crisis of our age, analyzing the two primary competing worldviews—naturalism and postmodernism before suggesting a third alternative, the theistic worldview which he unpacks as the “Kingdom Triangle” in the second part of the book. I appreciated Moreland’s previous work, Love Your God with All Your Mind, but I found the discussion of crisis of our age in the Kingdom Triangle lacking full dimension. I essentially agree that naturalism and post June 16, 2011 Moreland begins his book by assessing the crisis of our age, analyzing the two primary competing worldviews—naturalism and postmodernism before suggesting a third alternative, the theistic worldview which he unpacks as the “Kingdom Triangle” in the second part of the book. I appreciated Moreland’s previous work, Love Your God with All Your Mind, but I found the discussion of crisis of our age in the Kingdom Triangle lacking full dimension. I essentially agree that naturalism and postmodern views cannot match the brilliant drama of the kingdom. However, the logical analysis fails to capture that nuances and eclectic variety of the contemporary situation, placing the contours of the two perspectives in categories that might be better understood as a continuum, or even as a patchwork quilt that makes redemptive use of the old into something new. Still, Moreland correctly asserts “thinness” of a secularizing naturalism and a relativizing postmodernism is answered by the good news of God’s kingdom. Whether a person’s worldview is “thick” or “thin,” the good news of the kingdom requires a complete transformation of the heart, mind, soul, and strength. Perhaps postmodernism was a necessary response to the deficiencies of the naturalistic/scientific perspective, articulating an insightful critique without the fullness of the life in the kingdom. Similarly, the naturalistic worldview was not completely corrupted, but also lacked the wholeness of the kingdom. In my experience, many folks belong simultaneously to both worlds, or perhaps find themselves between a convalescing naturalism and an adolescent postmodernism. Maybe I simply have no knowledge of people who are hardcore either way. And many “Christian” folks, like myself, may find themselves stepping into a third “drama” of Christ’s kingdom. Consistently or not, worldviews may overlap, and each individual and collective perspective must undergo radical revision in the light of the reality of God and under his domain. It is not clear to me that “Christianity” necessarily equals life in the kingdom. Even would be “Christian” worldviews must be brought into the obedience of faith, of life in God’s reality. My experience is that many “Christian” worldviews are surprisingly thin. I do wish Moreland had spent a bit more time exploring a compelling vision of the kingdom in the first part of the book. His term “drama” seemed really promising at first, but faded into the silent stage curtains as he discussed the modern situation. Perhaps the logic of his case failed to appeal to me because I was looking for an appeal to the drama of imagination, which is also an important dimension of the intellectual life. I will need to give more thought to Moreland’s perspective on Intelligent Design and the implications of creation on worldview. I found it interesting that he so deeply appreciates Lee Strobel’s outstanding journalistic Case for Christ, but makes no reference, for example, to N. T. Wright’s compelling historical work in the New Testament and the People of God. Is it because Wright does not fit the “right” worldview category? I would love to hear more about this drama, anchored in real history, articulated in the Scriptures, accessible to our conflicted world in the unshakeable kingdom of God and unchanging person of Jesus Christ. In the second and best part of the book, Moreland thoughtfully explores what this kingdom stuff involves. He offers helpful observations on how a person might practically apprentice themselves to Jesus to renew the mind, renovate the soul, and receive the Spirit’s power. Moreland orates effectively on all three counts. The annotated bibliography is especially useful for pursing the issues further. I was delighted to discover Moreland’s appropriate emphasis on the “third wave” issues; I had no idea Moreland was a Vineyard guy. This was a worthwhile book; it has helped me think, drawn me toward the kingdom and reminded me of significant treasures that I had momentarily misplaced.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Brandon

    Didn't enjoy this one too much. Sort of a hodge-podge of sensational inciting comments and deeper philosophical/formational subjects. I couldn't figure out who his audience was: to shallow to be deep and to complex to be introductory. I'm not sure who'd I'd ever recommend this to. --- Notes: See "The Making of the Modern University" by Julie Reuben "The abandonment of Christian monotheism from the cognitive domain meant that there was no longer a basis for a unified curriculum. Without a single, r Didn't enjoy this one too much. Sort of a hodge-podge of sensational inciting comments and deeper philosophical/formational subjects. I couldn't figure out who his audience was: to shallow to be deep and to complex to be introductory. I'm not sure who'd I'd ever recommend this to. --- Notes: See "The Making of the Modern University" by Julie Reuben "The abandonment of Christian monotheism from the cognitive domain meant that there was no longer a basis for a unified curriculum. Without a single, rational God, why think that there is a unity to truth, that one discipline should have anything at all to do with another discipline? Thus, uni-versities gave wave to plural-versities, and we have lived with fragmentation in our schools ever since the 1930's." p70 Why? Aren't their purely practical reasons for a shift into specialization--the amount of human learning has exploded, and in the 1930's the tools to keep track and sort through the volumes of information being produced had not yet been developed. Compare this to the unification we're seeing in the age of wikipedia. As scholarly journals move towards easier access to information (as demanded by a generation entitled to all information) will not the plural-ness give way to the uni-ness? This feels like an unnecessary interjection of monotheism to make an argument that will be exciting only to the monotheistic base. Q: Is it unfair to distinguish between knowledge gained from material science and knowledge obtained from other sources? Or is it merely the emphasis on the validity of what is seen (as opposed to what is not seen) that is the problem? "Is there nonempirical knowledge?" p76 "Moral rules without knowledge degenerate into customs such as "don't eat your peas with a knife," and customs are too trivial to marshal the courage and effort needed to live by and internalize them." Q: Does the Bible offer a form of moral relativism with it's changing 'covenant' over time? Moral law is relative to the timeline of God's entrance into human affairs. "The skeptic tries to force the particularist to be a methodist by asking the "how-do-you-know?" question, since the skeptic is implying that before you can know, you must have criteria for knowledge. The skeptic knows he can refute the methodist. But the particularist will resist the slide into methodism by reaffirming that he can know some specific item without having to say how he knows it. For example, the particularist will say, "I know that mercy is a virtue and not a vice even if I don't know how it is that I know this. But, Mr. Skeptic, why do you think that I have to know how I know this before I can know it?" " p125 "Knowledge by acquaintance is an important foundation for all knowledge, and in an important sense, experience or direct awareness of reality is the basis for everything we know." p127 See "Early Christian Fathers" by Cyril C. Richardson See "The Problem of the Criterion" by Roderick Chisholm See "Psalmody and Prayer in the Writings of Evagrius Ponticus" by Luke Dysinger "This literature is replete with detailed descriptions of the different compartments of the soul, the various movements that take place within it, a discernment of those movements, and the formation of the fruit of the Spirit within the souls as a means toward growing in the spirutal life."

  9. 5 out of 5

    Jhughes1

    “Kingdom Triangle,” J. P. Moreland’s latest book, has received high praise. It was awarded the 2008 Christianity Today Book Award in the category of Spirituality. It has been reviewed favorably elsewhere, and the jacket cover includes endorsements by Chuck Colson, Lee Strobel, and Ravi Zacharias. Kingdom Triangle represents something of a “magnum opus” for this distinguished Christian philosopher and defender of the faith. In responding to the news that his book received the award from Christian “Kingdom Triangle,” J. P. Moreland’s latest book, has received high praise. It was awarded the 2008 Christianity Today Book Award in the category of Spirituality. It has been reviewed favorably elsewhere, and the jacket cover includes endorsements by Chuck Colson, Lee Strobel, and Ravi Zacharias. Kingdom Triangle represents something of a “magnum opus” for this distinguished Christian philosopher and defender of the faith. In responding to the news that his book received the award from Christianity Today he said “…I believe it is my most important book to date and I have never felt God’s leading in writing a book more than with Kingdom Triangle.” The book is written in two parts. Part 1 is a lament of sorts, an analysis of the decline of Christianity in Western culture. He explains the shift from Christian Theism to naturalism and then to postmodernism, along with the effec that these shifts have had on the church and on our society. This part of the book looks somewhat familiar for those acquainted with his body of work (e.g., Scaling the Secular City). He is echoing some of the same problems noted by other leading evangelicals, and there is no doubt that the church is in fact facing a crisis in the West. I can wholeheartedly recommend this part of the book to any thinking Christian. You may find it a bit dense and heady, but you really should stretch yourself because his analysis is penetrating and insightful. Understanding how to respond to naturalism and post-modernism is critically important for evangelism and ecclesiology (e.g., the emergent movement misunderstands post-modernism). The second half of the book presents Moreland’s three-part solution to the problems facing the church, and this is where the book takes its name “triangle.” The three legs of this metaphorical stool are 1) the recovery of knowledge, 2) the rennovation of the soul, and 3) the restoration of the Kingdom’s miraculous power. See the rest of the review at: http://jhughes.neoblogs.org/

  10. 4 out of 5

    Noel Burke

    This will be my 100th book read. Back in 2007 I read a book by JP Moreland that changed my whole outlook on Christian living. His argument for knowing what you believe and why was so persuasive and convicting that I have never been able to shack it since. This book's premise is similar in subject but considers a few more aspects of Christian living and community in the big "C" Church. There is also an interesting section that discusses miraculous gifts if you have never thought about those befor This will be my 100th book read. Back in 2007 I read a book by JP Moreland that changed my whole outlook on Christian living. His argument for knowing what you believe and why was so persuasive and convicting that I have never been able to shack it since. This book's premise is similar in subject but considers a few more aspects of Christian living and community in the big "C" Church. There is also an interesting section that discusses miraculous gifts if you have never thought about those before (the gift of healing, tongues, etc.). I would certainly recommend this author because he is a very good communicator and you don't walk away without having some things to think about, but I would caution his views on gifts of the spirit. I disagree with some of the conclusions that he has and am cautious with his connection with the 3rd wave church. Otherwise an interesting book. Listened on my iPod.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Ken

    Great review and clear presentation of the spirit of the age called postmodernism! Moreland does more than lament the reality and trends of today. He avoids the whining, complaining, and apocalyptic doomsday scenarios we have heard from so many college, seminary and university professors. He offers clear examples of what he considers to be the problem and for half of the book presents a hopeful, practical, and faith-filled approach to the future. Other than a couple of places where he goes deep Great review and clear presentation of the spirit of the age called postmodernism! Moreland does more than lament the reality and trends of today. He avoids the whining, complaining, and apocalyptic doomsday scenarios we have heard from so many college, seminary and university professors. He offers clear examples of what he considers to be the problem and for half of the book presents a hopeful, practical, and faith-filled approach to the future. Other than a couple of places where he goes deep into philosophy and esoteric language the writing is clear and down-to-earth. Reading this book has helped me recover the Christian mind, renovate the soul and restore the Spirit's power. This was a very thought-provoking and refreshing read.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Garland Vance

    Moreland's book was excellent. It is a must-read for students who are preparing for college, as it helps them understand the worldviews they will encounter in the university while simultaneously calling them to live a bold life. It is also helpful for those who are past the college years but who want to live a life that counts for something. Moreland engages both the philosophical and the practical--balancing both very well. This book will not only challenge what you think about faith but also ch Moreland's book was excellent. It is a must-read for students who are preparing for college, as it helps them understand the worldviews they will encounter in the university while simultaneously calling them to live a bold life. It is also helpful for those who are past the college years but who want to live a life that counts for something. Moreland engages both the philosophical and the practical--balancing both very well. This book will not only challenge what you think about faith but also challenge your personal development.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Bud Hewlett

    J. P. Moreland is one of my favorite authors, but this book only gets three stars for a couple of reasons. The material in the first several chapters was largely a restatement of things covered in his other books already listed on my Goodreads account. The material in the last chapter was interesting and I must say it caused me a certain amount of cognitive dissonance, but I'm still not sold on the Vineyard movement. I need to check it out further, but my initial reaction is somewhat skeptical. J. P. Moreland is one of my favorite authors, but this book only gets three stars for a couple of reasons. The material in the first several chapters was largely a restatement of things covered in his other books already listed on my Goodreads account. The material in the last chapter was interesting and I must say it caused me a certain amount of cognitive dissonance, but I'm still not sold on the Vineyard movement. I need to check it out further, but my initial reaction is somewhat skeptical.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Eric

    Moreland, ever faithful to the Lord, offers a fine (and challenging) effort in his attempt to bridge and find balance between two seemingly antithetical poles of the Christian experience: rigid anti-spiritual intellectualism and prevailing anti-intellectual spiritualism. The story of Moreland's personal move from the former to somewhere in the leaning middle is a journey worthy of notice and consideration. Moreland, ever faithful to the Lord, offers a fine (and challenging) effort in his attempt to bridge and find balance between two seemingly antithetical poles of the Christian experience: rigid anti-spiritual intellectualism and prevailing anti-intellectual spiritualism. The story of Moreland's personal move from the former to somewhere in the leaning middle is a journey worthy of notice and consideration.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Eric Walter

    A compelling introduction to three areas contemporary western Christianity needs to address. Heavily philosophical at points, inspiringly helpful at others, and overall a challenging thesis to consider. I am personally excited by the teachings of Moreland, Willard, and the like- and pray for more people to take this book for a whirl.

  16. 5 out of 5

    John

    I wanted to read this book for several months and a friend let me borrow his copy. Unfortunately, I was let down. I have great respect for J. P. Moreland and was surprised by some of his disclosure. I think the chapter, Renovation of the Soul, was difficult for me to embrace. I didn't want to finish the book, but pushed through to the end. I wanted to read this book for several months and a friend let me borrow his copy. Unfortunately, I was let down. I have great respect for J. P. Moreland and was surprised by some of his disclosure. I think the chapter, Renovation of the Soul, was difficult for me to embrace. I didn't want to finish the book, but pushed through to the end.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Jeffrey

    If I was forced to live on a desert island for the rest of my life and I could only pick ten books to bring with me, this would be one of them. The only thing I would add to the Kingdom Triangle would be a section on the action (The Kingdom of God).

  18. 5 out of 5

    Jeremiah

    I want to live out my life every day growing in the areas discussed in this book. Ditch Rick Warren, Joel Osteen, Joyce Meyer, T.D. Jakes or whoever the pop Christian author is and steep yourself in some real life transforming teaching; here is one to not pass up.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Chris Wagner

    I learned about the different world-views we have in this culture and how people hunger for a greater purpose and are settling for less. We Christians need to be more effective by recovering the mind, renovating the soul and restore the Spirit's power. I learned about the different world-views we have in this culture and how people hunger for a greater purpose and are settling for less. We Christians need to be more effective by recovering the mind, renovating the soul and restore the Spirit's power.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Jerome

    A must read for every thinking Christian and thought leader!

  21. 5 out of 5

    Tommy

    Even though I don't agree with everything stated by Moreland, I found this book invigorating. I am challenged in my thinking and need to reexamine. Even though I don't agree with everything stated by Moreland, I found this book invigorating. I am challenged in my thinking and need to reexamine.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Shawna

    A very comprehensive explanation of current culture, how it affects our thinking as Christians, followed by the truth of Christianity and ways to grow in the Spirits power.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Zach

  24. 5 out of 5

    Jordy

  25. 5 out of 5

    Jonathan Noyes

  26. 5 out of 5

    Nathan Boates

  27. 5 out of 5

    Calvin Sun

  28. 4 out of 5

    Melissa Brotherton

  29. 5 out of 5

    Kevin Snider

  30. 4 out of 5

    Lee

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