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Tome of Battle: The Book of Nine Swords

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What's Included? (1) Tome of Battle: The Book of Nine Swords Specs: Title: Tome of Battle: The Book of Nine Swords Published By: Wizards of the Coast Type: Dungeons & Dragons supplement Edition/Version: 3.5 Circa Year: 2006 Overall Condition: 8 out of 10 - While we feel confident in our grading, we do not make any guarantees about the official grading potential for this or What's Included? (1) Tome of Battle: The Book of Nine Swords Specs: Title: Tome of Battle: The Book of Nine Swords Published By: Wizards of the Coast Type: Dungeons & Dragons supplement Edition/Version: 3.5 Circa Year: 2006 Overall Condition: 8 out of 10 - While we feel confident in our grading, we do not make any guarantees about the official grading potential for this or any item.  - Slightly blunted corners - General wear on the covers - The pages are in tact and free of markings, “dog-ears”, or other damages/blemishes.


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What's Included? (1) Tome of Battle: The Book of Nine Swords Specs: Title: Tome of Battle: The Book of Nine Swords Published By: Wizards of the Coast Type: Dungeons & Dragons supplement Edition/Version: 3.5 Circa Year: 2006 Overall Condition: 8 out of 10 - While we feel confident in our grading, we do not make any guarantees about the official grading potential for this or What's Included? (1) Tome of Battle: The Book of Nine Swords Specs: Title: Tome of Battle: The Book of Nine Swords Published By: Wizards of the Coast Type: Dungeons & Dragons supplement Edition/Version: 3.5 Circa Year: 2006 Overall Condition: 8 out of 10 - While we feel confident in our grading, we do not make any guarantees about the official grading potential for this or any item.  - Slightly blunted corners - General wear on the covers - The pages are in tact and free of markings, “dog-ears”, or other damages/blemishes.

30 review for Tome of Battle: The Book of Nine Swords

  1. 5 out of 5

    Luke

    Powergamers rejoice! This late addition to D&D's 3rd edition is a quirky, slightly overpowered expansion, which finally allows fighting-class characters of high level to stack up to wizards and sorcerers, who famously go nuclear around Level 14 or so. The classes contained in this book are some of my favourites, both as classes unto themselves, and as side classes to take a one- or two-level dip into. Be advised, if you play with powergamers, these classes are very easy to unbalance. Things can g Powergamers rejoice! This late addition to D&D's 3rd edition is a quirky, slightly overpowered expansion, which finally allows fighting-class characters of high level to stack up to wizards and sorcerers, who famously go nuclear around Level 14 or so. The classes contained in this book are some of my favourites, both as classes unto themselves, and as side classes to take a one- or two-level dip into. Be advised, if you play with powergamers, these classes are very easy to unbalance. Things can go sideways real fast if you're not careful. But for power-heavy games, or games where you want to duplicate the feel of more mystic battles with wild thematic sword-saint abilities, it's a great resource for breathing some new life back into your familiar 3.5 edition world. Definitely not a "necessary" book, and for advanced players only, but a lot of fun in the right hands with the right attitude.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Juho Pohjalainen

    I had a lot more fun with this one, back in the day, than I probably should have. It's cheesy and over-the-top and all-around ridiculous, but a lot of this edition of D&D was to begin with, and these classes still aren't as strong as clerics or druids. Well, save maybe if your DM lets you get away with all the Iron Heart Surge stuff. I had a lot more fun with this one, back in the day, than I probably should have. It's cheesy and over-the-top and all-around ridiculous, but a lot of this edition of D&D was to begin with, and these classes still aren't as strong as clerics or druids. Well, save maybe if your DM lets you get away with all the Iron Heart Surge stuff.

  3. 4 out of 5

    David

    The idea was interesting, but I felt that the implementation was really bad. It could just be cultural thing for me. The source material was basically inspired by Oriental martial arts, fighting styles, movies, and anime. I found the whole implementation to be really cheesy and mostly nonsensical. In summary, the sourcebook is about providing melee replacements - so goodbye fighter, ranger, and paladin. If you use this sourcebook, there's zero reasons to play with the original core warrior classe The idea was interesting, but I felt that the implementation was really bad. It could just be cultural thing for me. The source material was basically inspired by Oriental martial arts, fighting styles, movies, and anime. I found the whole implementation to be really cheesy and mostly nonsensical. In summary, the sourcebook is about providing melee replacements - so goodbye fighter, ranger, and paladin. If you use this sourcebook, there's zero reasons to play with the original core warrior classes, as the three new classes (crusader, swordsage, and warblade) are way more powerful - unless of course, you happen to want to play a blackguard or you like tracking or archery. The three new classes play like front-line wizards - you can generally cast one "spell" (manoeuvre) once per encounter. In fact, as they scale up in power, you probably don't need rogues or wizards much, since some manoeuvres can do sneak attacks and AoE attacks. The sourcebook requires significant investment as it adds a lot of new rules. The majority of the content aside are all geared towards giving the new classes more options. I dislike the new classes primarily because the more they're described felt more like prestige classes to me - all crusaders fight for a religion, all swordsages are scholarly fighters seeking for a "truth", and all warblades are glory-seekers. There are nine martial disciplines (hence, nine swords), but they are very oddly restricted to certain classes - why? This is one of the nonsensical things. If we're talking about oriental inspiration, this sourcebook serves up a lot of categorisations and restrictions just for the sake of it. Sure, the DM could change it, but I'm reviewing based on what's offered. Backstory-wise, the Temple of the Nine Swords is fine, I just found the whole internal conflict to be very contrived. The so-called legendary founder? Such a character can't be built using the mechanics presented in this book, due to the limits on the number of manoeuvres you can learn. Throw in how he managed to accumulate nine swords of such varied backgrounds and they just destroyed any plot cohesiveness. And the prestige classes? They're ok within the context of this book, except for the so-called "Master of Nine" - that class is more like taking specialist levels in several schools of magic than being a "master" of several disciplines. The flavouring is just so wrong. But that's enough ranting. I mainly dislike the sourcebook because I found the flavour and imagery to be really bad. Then I dislike the power level of the new mechanics, they're not just slightly powerful - they're very powerful. I'm probably not the target demographic for this book, seeing how cheesy and over-the-top some of the content are. Perhaps this sourcebook was not meant to be serious, and more a fun thing; but it's not for me.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Gregory

    This book adds interesting elements to D&D. Unfortunately many of the explanations are ambiguous.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Hazel Phoenix

  6. 5 out of 5

    Benjamin

  7. 4 out of 5

    alicia croy

  8. 4 out of 5

    Patrick

  9. 4 out of 5

    John

  10. 5 out of 5

    Clark

  11. 5 out of 5

    Pattie

  12. 5 out of 5

    Lisa M

  13. 5 out of 5

    Ignacio

  14. 5 out of 5

    Kingcrowley

  15. 4 out of 5

    Andrew19

  16. 4 out of 5

    Michael Kieffer

  17. 4 out of 5

    Russell Hayes

  18. 5 out of 5

    Nancy Armstrong-Morgan

  19. 4 out of 5

    Robert

  20. 4 out of 5

    Γιώργος Λαγκώνας

  21. 5 out of 5

    Ronnie Komstedt

  22. 5 out of 5

    Dale Donovan

  23. 5 out of 5

    Ben

  24. 5 out of 5

    Paul G. Standley

  25. 4 out of 5

    R

  26. 5 out of 5

    Joshua Newport

  27. 4 out of 5

    Patrick Cofell

  28. 5 out of 5

    Silas

  29. 5 out of 5

    Tim

  30. 5 out of 5

    Ladydee

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