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From the battlefields of Phall and Isstvan, to the haunted shadows of Terra itself – the greatest war in the history of mankind rages on. While the traitor Legions continue their campaign of terror across the galaxy, preparations are made for the defence of the Imperial Palace and the final, inevitable reckoning that must yet come between Horus and the Emperor... About the From the battlefields of Phall and Isstvan, to the haunted shadows of Terra itself – the greatest war in the history of mankind rages on. While the traitor Legions continue their campaign of terror across the galaxy, preparations are made for the defence of the Imperial Palace and the final, inevitable reckoning that must yet come between Horus and the Emperor... About the book This anthology spans the entire Horus Heresy, with short stories from Dan Abnett, Graham McNeill and Gav Thorpe, as well as two brand new novella-length tales. Learn the fate of Rogal Dorn’s fleet originally sent to Isstvan III in ‘The Crimson Fist’ by John French, and descend deeper into the darkness of the Night Lords Legion in ‘Prince of Crows’ by Aaron Dembski-Bowden. The Crimson Fist - John French The Dark King - Graham McNeill The Lightning Tower - Dan Abnett The Kaban Project - Graham McNeill Raven's Flight - Gav Thorpe Death of a Silversmith - Graham McNeill Prince of Crows - Aaron Dembski-Bowden


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From the battlefields of Phall and Isstvan, to the haunted shadows of Terra itself – the greatest war in the history of mankind rages on. While the traitor Legions continue their campaign of terror across the galaxy, preparations are made for the defence of the Imperial Palace and the final, inevitable reckoning that must yet come between Horus and the Emperor... About the From the battlefields of Phall and Isstvan, to the haunted shadows of Terra itself – the greatest war in the history of mankind rages on. While the traitor Legions continue their campaign of terror across the galaxy, preparations are made for the defence of the Imperial Palace and the final, inevitable reckoning that must yet come between Horus and the Emperor... About the book This anthology spans the entire Horus Heresy, with short stories from Dan Abnett, Graham McNeill and Gav Thorpe, as well as two brand new novella-length tales. Learn the fate of Rogal Dorn’s fleet originally sent to Isstvan III in ‘The Crimson Fist’ by John French, and descend deeper into the darkness of the Night Lords Legion in ‘Prince of Crows’ by Aaron Dembski-Bowden. The Crimson Fist - John French The Dark King - Graham McNeill The Lightning Tower - Dan Abnett The Kaban Project - Graham McNeill Raven's Flight - Gav Thorpe Death of a Silversmith - Graham McNeill Prince of Crows - Aaron Dembski-Bowden

30 review for Shadows of Treachery

  1. 4 out of 5

    Abhinav

    You can find my full review over at The Founding Fields: http://thefoundingfields.com/2012/09/... Shadowhawk reviews the latest Horus Heresy anthology, containing two brand new novella-length stories, as well as several reprints of old audio dramas and a formerly exclusive short story. “One of the best anthologies that Black Library has put out, each story a perfect thematic fit to each other.” ~The Founding Fields Shadows of Treachery is the fourth anthology in the Horus Heresy series, following on You can find my full review over at The Founding Fields: http://thefoundingfields.com/2012/09/... Shadowhawk reviews the latest Horus Heresy anthology, containing two brand new novella-length stories, as well as several reprints of old audio dramas and a formerly exclusive short story. “One of the best anthologies that Black Library has put out, each story a perfect thematic fit to each other.” ~The Founding Fields Shadows of Treachery is the fourth anthology in the Horus Heresy series, following on from the highly successful Tales of Heresy, Age of Darkness, and The Primarchs. It also marks a slight departure in terms of content from these anthologies, for where the first two contain only short stories and the third only novellas, this one contains two novellas and five short stories, an eclectic mix of tales from across the Heresy lore, both old and new alike. And so the stage is set for what promises to be a really great anthology, despite my earlier reservations as about a good 45% of the anthology is reprint of older material. The lead-in story is Crimson Fist by John French, an Imperial Fists novella through and through by the man who gave us the downright excellent The Last Remembrancer in Age of Darkness. John French is among the newer crop of Black Library authors and has yet to have a novel of his own published, but given how good his short fiction has been so far, I’m sure one is in the works. Crimson Fist is a tale of two halves, the first dealing with the vengeance fleet that Primarch Rogal Dorn dispatched to Isstvan after learning of Warmaster Horus’ betrayal in Flight of the Eisenstein, and the second deals with Dorn himself, and his favoured son, the legion’s First Captain, Sigismund the Templar. What struck me the most about Crimson Fist is just how well John has captured the personalities of Sigismund and Dorn, making these into so much more than they have been before, except of course in the excellent short stories (formerly audio dramas) by Dan Abnett and Graham McNeill that are also contained within the pages of this anthology. The scenes on Terra as Dorn begins the preparation of fortifying the Imperial Palace to deal with the traitors’ eventual invasion, are laden with emotion as John gets into the head of the Praetorian, Dorn. The interplay between him and Sigismund is well and truly that of a father and son in a galaxy of war, and is a very personal relationship rather than some of the more impersonal ones we have seen so far, like Horus and Abaddon which is a one-way trip of unbridled admiration and fraternal love. Dorn is someone who cares about his genetic sons, much in the same way that the more compassionate/passionate Primarchs like Sanguinius do. And as was later revealed, John really did his homework on this part of the story, for these scenes fit in extremely well with Dan’s The Lightning Tower and Graham’s The Dark King, in terms of the mood, the various references to characters and places, etc. Definitely the best part of the novella. The second part, told in first person through the eyes of Alexis Polux, one of the remaining senior commanders of the vengeance fleet, and the future first Chapter Master of the Crimson Fists, is written well, but it does not match up to the novella’s second half. Don’t get me wrong, I loved the insight into what happens in the Phall system, one of the more defining battles of the Imperial Fists prior to the Siege of Terra (and some might say the only one of note undertaken by the legion), but it was still lacking in a few places. For one, the actual void battle doesn’t happen until much later in the story and that disappointed me somewhat. The cover sets up a really fantastic look into what went on in Phall, but the event itself is rushed through. Its even more disappointing for me as when I had first seen the cover, I had expected this anthology to be anovel about Phall, which I think would have been a bloody fantastic job, but unfortunately not so. Still, this is a pretty good entry into the series, and one of the better ones in fact. Rating: 9/10 Next we have The Dark King by Graham McNeill. This is one of the older stories in the series, possibly the oldest alongside The Lightning Tower. And it used to be an audio drama too. I found this to be a truly fascinating story because of the fact that this one really gets into the head of Primarch Konrad Curze of the Night Lords legion, one the traitors during the Heresy. It marks that final rift between Dorn and Curze, the one where the latter murderously assaults the latter, and essentially goes renegade, until he marks an appearance at Isstvan as part of the second wave of attackers and betrays the legions of the first wave. This is a story that is all about the relationships between the Primarchs. Curze is confronted by first Dorn’s apparent naivete (in Curze’s eyes) about the goal of the Great Crusade and the legions’ place among it, and then is betrayed by Fulgrim to Dorn where Curze’s prescience is concerned. It is an almost heart-breaking story, almost because even though this is set in the 31st millennium, it echoes the full mood and atmosphere of the relentless 41st millennium where treachery and war are supreme. This also shows off Curze’s other psychic power, the one that grants him power in darkness and over shadows, to use as he sees fit. Ultimately, it is about the dichotomy of the Primarch, his frailty where his prescience is concerned, and his lethality where his physical prowess as a hand-crafted warlord is concerned. Well and truly a Heresy classic story. Rating: 10/10 Then we have Dan Abnett’s The Lightning Tower, which is quite possibly the best Heresy short story to date, although Matt Farrer’s After Desh’ea, John French’s The Last Remembrancer and Graham McNeill’s The Kaban Project are strong contenders. This is another story that concerns Dorn and is all about him coming to terms with his worst fears about the Heresy. This is a somewhat concurrent story to John French’s Crimson Fist, but more towards the other extreme of the timeline therein. With nothing but Malcador the Sigillite’s counsel at his disposal, the Emperor being busy in his deepest vaults within the Imperial Palace, Dorn is a conflicted man because he cannot grasp what it is that could have turned Horus traitor. And I loved this story start to finish. This is a character study about Dorn, one where we really get to feel and experience what he does, his hopes and dreams and his nightmares. Together with the other two stories so far in the anthology, it forms a trilogy that is bound tightly in its themes and characters. It might as well have been subtexted “Shadows of Treachery” for Dorn has to come to understand and wrestle with that concept where it concerns his traitor brothers Rating: 10/10

  2. 4 out of 5

    David

    Took longer than expected. It was a good read though.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Veronica Anrathi

    I finally finished all of the shorts that I skipped back in the day, now I can say that I’ve read Shadows of Treachery and it turned out to be my favorite anthology so far. It was also very pleasing to re-read some of my all-time favorites like The Dark King and The Prince of Crows. This book contains seven powerful stories, some stronger than the others, but still engaging and entertaining. Some definitely become the real classics of the Horus Heresy, and rightfully so. I am happy to finally wr I finally finished all of the shorts that I skipped back in the day, now I can say that I’ve read Shadows of Treachery and it turned out to be my favorite anthology so far. It was also very pleasing to re-read some of my all-time favorites like The Dark King and The Prince of Crows. This book contains seven powerful stories, some stronger than the others, but still engaging and entertaining. Some definitely become the real classics of the Horus Heresy, and rightfully so. I am happy to finally write a proper review for each of them. 1 John French - The Crimson Fist -***** I was delaying this one for the longest time and I was oh so wrong to do so. Expecting a lot of Iron Warriors vs. Imperial Fists action scenes, I was very pleasantly surprised to read extremely interesting pieces of lore around Alexis Polux, a character I truly enjoyed in Pharos, and Sigismund, the absolute legend of a man. Very, very nice. 2 Graham McNeill - The Dark King - ***** For me, a Night Lords fan, this is a classic. I can’t remember how many times I’ve read it or listen to the audio, it gets me every single time. Curze is an amazing, complex character, an absolute madman, yet the only person who seems to see the truth. This is written exceptionally well, and in audio format – performed perfectly. One of the very few pieces in Horus Heresy where Night Lords are presented as the main focus of the story, it’s captivating, full of both important lore and amazing atmosphere. One of my absolute favorites, forever. 3 Dan Abnett - The Lightning Tower - **** This one was first released in 2007 and it shows… somehow. Even though I only read it about 5 years ago for the first time, I am definitely getting this feeling with the way characters and events are being described here. It is interesting how we just recently got Now Peals Midnight and The Board Is Set shorts, 11 years later Dorn is still there, waiting, and the main event is finally coming. However, I digress. It is a good atmospheric piece and I enjoyed reading it again. 4 Graham McNeill - The Kaban Project - ***** I personally loved this one a lot. I’ve heard about this story a long time ago, but reading it now, when I finally found deep interest in Adeptus Mechanicus, was a good time for sure. The Kaban Machine being presented as this pet/child-like persona, seemingly naïve, but lacking basic human traits alike to sociopaths, viewing people’s words and deeds strictly in black and white, was fascinating. I ended up having a few questions at the end, but overall I enjoyed it very much. 5 Gav thorpe - Raven's Flight - *** Not bad, but sadly this short does not live up to the glory of others surrounding it in the anthology. A prequel to Deliverence Lost. Corax reflecting on the tragedy of astartes fighting and killing each other was the highlight of it. 6 Graham McNeill - Death of a Silversmith - ***** This one I just read for the second time. I find it amazingly captivating. A master of his craft dying, not knowing why, while being a tiny part of the grand game at play. All the little nods to the early Heresy novels, little hints and foreshadowing, makes this short story a rather enjoyable experience. I’d love to someday read it again. 7 Aaron Dembski-Bowden - Prince of Crows - ***** To me this one is a masterpiece, one of the few Horus Heresy pieces that I am never tired of re-reading or listening to. This novella had an impact on me and became a source of inspiration. Sevatar is undoubtedly one of the most fascinating characters in the franchise and it is always extremely interesting to follow him both in action (as in Prince of Crows) and in loneliness (as in the Long Night). He is one of the most well developed, multinational, complicated astartes, even though we don't have much written about him. This is the reason why I cherish every little piece of lore that shows more of his personality. I can properly share my initial thoughts from the first time reading it since it was a long time ago, but this story will always have a special place in my heart. The scene that describes his background on Nostramo, a boy talking to the crows, is what I always have in mind when thinking of Jago, it is eerie and beautiful, frightening and luring, just as he is as a whole. I can't find words to truly represent my love for this piece so I will leave this review just like that. I love it with all my heart.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Jacob

    This might be the best collection of Horus Heresy short stories there is.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Tiamat

    By the Emperor — I didn’t think I’d ever read an anthology where every story was a 5-star read. I was wrong.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Andrew Fletcher

    I think this is the best short story collection I have read for the Horus Heresy so far. I am not a huge fan of the mechanicum but the short story ‘The Kaban Project’ was very enjoyable. I also enjoyed the ‘Crimson Fist’ and felt this gave a good account about the Imperial Fists and what their legion is all about. I was slightly disappointed with ‘Prince of Crows’ as I had heard great things but it was still good. My favourite from this collection was ‘Death of a Silversmith’ a short but interesti I think this is the best short story collection I have read for the Horus Heresy so far. I am not a huge fan of the mechanicum but the short story ‘The Kaban Project’ was very enjoyable. I also enjoyed the ‘Crimson Fist’ and felt this gave a good account about the Imperial Fists and what their legion is all about. I was slightly disappointed with ‘Prince of Crows’ as I had heard great things but it was still good. My favourite from this collection was ‘Death of a Silversmith’ a short but interesting account from a remembrancer about the Heresy and his death aboard an infamous ship.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Matthew Hipsher

    Another perfectly timed "anthology" of short stories to launch the next set of books in the Horus Heresy series. We get several short stories focusing on many different Legions, but the best of the group is the story "Prince of Crows" which focuses on Konrad Curze, the Nighthaunter, and his legion after his battle with Lionel Johnson. Great read, all well paced and each adds a necessary view into the developments of the heresy.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Joe Dembowski

    Finally an anthology that involves the Imperial Fists! The short story, "The Lightning Tower",shows the human side of Rogal Dorn, which is a rarity in itself. I am not a fan of most anthologies , but these stories actually contribute to building the plot of the series. Definitely worth a read if you are a fan of the Fists (2 out of 7 stories involve them). Also, some love is given to the Night Lords if that's your thing.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Tarl

    Another Horus Heresy anthology. Honestly, when I came to this book I was a bit concerned that I would have to slog through a bunch of stories that really wouldn't interest me. Sure, previous anthologies in this series have had their good stories, but all in all most have been just average, and I expected as much from this collection. 'The Crimson Fist' was the first story in this collection, and arguably the one I had the hardest time slogging through. Much like the Imperial Fists themselves, thi Another Horus Heresy anthology. Honestly, when I came to this book I was a bit concerned that I would have to slog through a bunch of stories that really wouldn't interest me. Sure, previous anthologies in this series have had their good stories, but all in all most have been just average, and I expected as much from this collection. 'The Crimson Fist' was the first story in this collection, and arguably the one I had the hardest time slogging through. Much like the Imperial Fists themselves, this story was a test of endurance and stubborn drive to finish. There were points in it where I admit, the action, the betrayal, it was interesting to read. However, the over arching plot wasn't enough to keep my attention through the sheer size of this novella and the amount of character POV and first/third POV switches that were contained within. Almost half the collection in length, this is the longest story in the collection and a hard one to get through. The rest of this anthology collect together some of the previously published Heresy stories (Lightning Tower & The Kaban Project to name two) as well as some other stories. The later stories, with the exception of 'Death of a Silversmith' circle around the Night Lord legion and their Primarch, dealing with their conflict with Rogal Dorn and the effects afterwards, as well as the after effects with their clash with the Dark Angels. (from a previous anthology) The later stories are all handled well, each giving out just a little more of the history and conflict of the Horus Heresy, as well as bringing to light some of the Emperor's own flaws when he created his children and their eventual turn on him. The Night Lord's reasons for turning on the Imperium is handled well, and in the long run makes sense, especially when placed alongside their Primarch. No longer does it become the legion's fault for their turn, but rather a flaw in their Primarch's teaching of fear used for control. It's an interesting collection of stories, written by some of the better writers in the Horus Heresy and wider 40k novel series. Along the other books in the series, this collection is one of the stronger books and well worth the read. (more so if you are a Night Lords fan and want more details about their chapter/flaws/etc.) If you are reading the Horus Heresy series, you will already be picking this book up. If you are reading it as a one off book, you should be able to do so without knowing too much of the Heresy's history itself. (which you will probably already know parts of if you are a 40k fan.) All in all, it's a good anthology and well worth the read.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Jaye

    This was my first new entry in the Horus Heresy series in over a year, and what a book it is. One of the strengths of this series is that the frame is writ large, giving the authors freedom to explore multiple characters and plotlines. By the same token, there is a built-in limit, because we all know how the story ends, eventually. If you don't know that, I won't be sharing it here. The authors cover a lot of unfamiliar (to me) ground here: Rogal Dorn and the Imperial Fists, Corax and his Raven G This was my first new entry in the Horus Heresy series in over a year, and what a book it is. One of the strengths of this series is that the frame is writ large, giving the authors freedom to explore multiple characters and plotlines. By the same token, there is a built-in limit, because we all know how the story ends, eventually. If you don't know that, I won't be sharing it here. The authors cover a lot of unfamiliar (to me) ground here: Rogal Dorn and the Imperial Fists, Corax and his Raven Guard, Konrad Curze and the Night Lords. Graham MacNeill even tackles the story of a forbidden sentient machine on Mars. There's good stuff here, but it's all just a tad depressing. Imagine that, depressing imagery in the Warhammer 40K universe.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Andrew Ziegler

    Three stars because three of the stories in here are printed versions of already published audio books. So, it felt like to me that this was a great set of two novellas, and one of them was vastly superior to the other. ADB's Night Lords are simply put the most sympathetic, bad ass, and down right approachable of the traitor marines. I have read the trilogy of novels he wrote and was floored by how much I liked really bad guys. Well, he did it again. Sevatar was amazing. This book is totally wor Three stars because three of the stories in here are printed versions of already published audio books. So, it felt like to me that this was a great set of two novellas, and one of them was vastly superior to the other. ADB's Night Lords are simply put the most sympathetic, bad ass, and down right approachable of the traitor marines. I have read the trilogy of novels he wrote and was floored by how much I liked really bad guys. Well, he did it again. Sevatar was amazing. This book is totally worth it for the Prince of Crows, but sadly lacking in the rest.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Nathan

    This short story anthology was a little disappointing. Its not that any of the individual stories are poor - they're honestly average for short story anthologies in this universe. The disappointment is that half the content is from audiobooks or previously published stories. It is, like everything else in the series, a necessary part of the overall tale of the Heresy though and worth the read to someone who has been following it closely.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Aleksi

    "Prince of Crows" is quite possibly the best novella I have ever read. "The Crimson Fist" was also awesome.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Gianfranco Mancini

    Maybe best Black Library antology ever.

  15. 4 out of 5

    David

    The Crimson Fist (Battle of Phall), the Kaban Project, and the Novella about the Night Lords, Prince of Crows, were my favorites in this collection.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Jean-Luc

    The galaxy is in flames. War has ripped the Imperium asunder. Now what? Here are 7 stories, mostly good, which bridge the gaps between the various books. * The Crimson Fist by John French - The VII Legion (Imperial Fists) were not massacred during the counterstrike on Isstvan III... So where were they? This is the story of how Alexis Pollux, the Crimson Fist, allowed the IV Legion (Iron Warriors) to assault the gates of Terra in the first place. Read before Unremembered Empire. * The Dark King by The galaxy is in flames. War has ripped the Imperium asunder. Now what? Here are 7 stories, mostly good, which bridge the gaps between the various books. * The Crimson Fist by John French - The VII Legion (Imperial Fists) were not massacred during the counterstrike on Isstvan III... So where were they? This is the story of how Alexis Pollux, the Crimson Fist, allowed the IV Legion (Iron Warriors) to assault the gates of Terra in the first place. Read before Unremembered Empire. * The Dark King by Graham McNeill - Konrad Curze, primarch of the VIII Legion (Night Lords), is sick and tired of people telling him he can't do as he pleases. Read after Galaxy in Flames. * The Lightning Tower - Space marines were designed to know no fear. It stands to reason that the primarchs, their genetic sires, are also immune to fear. Rogal Dorn, primarch of the Imperial Fists, is afraid. Read after The Dark King. * The Kaban Project by Graham McNeill - Artificial intelligence is illegal af, but Adept Pallas Ravachol has his side hustle. Read after Mechanicum. * Raven's Flight by Gav Thorpe - Corvus Corax's final days on Isstvan 5. Read before Deliverance Lost. * Death of a Silversmith by Graham McNeill - Where did the lodge tokens come from? This one takes place before Horus Rising. Safe to read after Galaxy in Flames. * Prince of Crows by Aaron Dembski-Bowden - Jago Sevatar, captain of the VIII Legion's 1st company, takes command after Konrad Curze is laid low by the Lion El'Jonson. Read before Unremembered Empire. Hands down, Prince of Crows is the best story in this collection. ADB's dialogue is top notch as always. "The casualty figures are on the wrong side of hilarious" is maybe my favorite status update ever. Curze has always been completely full of shit and Sevatar calling him on it is tremendously satisfying. “There was no other way.” “No? What other ways did you try?” “Sevatar…” “Answer me, father. What politics of peace did you teach? What scientific and social illumination did you bring to this society? In your quest for a human utopia, what other ways did you try beyond eating the flesh of stray dogs and skinning people alive?” “It. Was. The. Only. Way.” “The only way to do what? The only way to bring a population to heel? How then did the other primarchs manage it? How has world upon world managed it, without resorting to butchering children and broadcasting their screams across the planetary vox-net?” “Their world were never as… as serene as mine was.” “And the serenity of yours died the second your back was turned. So tell me again how you succeeded. Tell me again how this all worked perfectly.” “You overstep your bounds, First Captain.” “How can you lie to me like this? How can you lie to yourself? I stand here, inside your mind, witnessing a theatre of your own memories. Your way is the Eighth Legion way, now. But it has never been the only way. Just the easiest way.” Absolutely worth the price all by itself.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Hayley

    What a fabulous book. Every single story in here is wonderful. I'm not that big a fan of the Imperial Fists, but they also don't get a lot of attention, I feel like, and seeing them more fleshed out is really nice. I also loved the brief glimpse at Hastur Sejanus that we got - I wish we saw more of him (maybe Horus can have a primarch book and we can see them together, back before everything went to hell?). And the Night Lords! I didn't realize I was getting double Night Lords in this book! Seva What a fabulous book. Every single story in here is wonderful. I'm not that big a fan of the Imperial Fists, but they also don't get a lot of attention, I feel like, and seeing them more fleshed out is really nice. I also loved the brief glimpse at Hastur Sejanus that we got - I wish we saw more of him (maybe Horus can have a primarch book and we can see them together, back before everything went to hell?). And the Night Lords! I didn't realize I was getting double Night Lords in this book! Sevatar is hilarious and charming and awful, and I am reminded of how and why I love those murderous bastards so much. Great collection!

  18. 5 out of 5

    David

    Crimson Fist was ok - pretty typical 40k void warfare porn mostly, but the interesting stuff was the interaction between Dorn and Sigismund back on Terra. The Dark King - read and listened to the audiobook - very well made audiobook, great sound effects and acting added immensely to the atmosphere of this story. Great insight into the rage and insanity that is Curze and his so obvious break from the Imperium.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Brendan Davis

    This is a collection of short stories from Warhammer 40k, so if you're not looking for a 40k book don't take this for a recommendation. This is a solid collection of short stories from the Horus Heresy, so it's essentially delicious fast food. You eat it, enjoy it, and forget about it.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Victor Ward

    The first anthology of Horus Heresy that didn't leave me disappointed. The stories are a little more self-contained and the subjects are often interesting, even if there is still some of the running issue in every other character being a space marine with the same stock personality.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Clovis Ong

    Not a bad collection. The standout ones are surprisingly from McNeill. Abnett's offering is cool, dark, with a great twist at the end, but doesn't quite blow me away the way I usually expect an Abnett story to. The first and last stories, however, sucked.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Peter

    The most consistent of the HH anthologies so far. The two Night Lords stories were my favourites: I didn't really know much about this legion and their primarch before so it was nice to get an insight into their surprisingly deep backstory. Aaron Dembski-Bowden's writing of Sevatar is brilliant.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Andy

    Another anthology of WH40K stories related to the Horus Heresy. Took a while on this one as I put it down several times to work on other novels, but still enjoyed the stories when I got to them.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Steve

    Excellent collection of short stories.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Alasdair

    Heck me this was a great anthology.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Ashley

    The best of the HH short story collections, thus far.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Jonathan

    It’s a quick read that generally has a lot of strong stories in it.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Kyle Wilhite

    Worth it for Prince of Crows alone.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Martin Tunney

    Not My Favourite They saved the best of this action for the last few chapters. Battle of Phall was a good story covering a plot hole son well done there 😁

  30. 4 out of 5

    EJ Donaghey

    Builds and builds my reading universe Another great extension of the war hammer galaxy and characters. I am actually happy I’m behind the publish dates of all the books.

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