hits counter Unspoken Abandonment: Sometimes the hardest part of going to war is coming home - Ebook PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

Unspoken Abandonment: Sometimes the hardest part of going to war is coming home

Availability: Ready to download

Prepare to walk more than a mile in one soldier's boots as you see exactly what it's like to go to war and face the struggles of coming home. This is as real as it's going to get... Unspoken Abandonment is the story of one man's struggle to return home from the war in Afghanistan, only to find the person he once was may never be the same. Bryan Wood is a military veteran wh Prepare to walk more than a mile in one soldier's boots as you see exactly what it's like to go to war and face the struggles of coming home. This is as real as it's going to get... Unspoken Abandonment is the story of one man's struggle to return home from the war in Afghanistan, only to find the person he once was may never be the same. Bryan Wood is a military veteran who served during combat operations in Eastern Afghanistan. After returning from combat, he found that his life was falling apart at every turn, and Bryan faced the greatest battle of his life in finding his own peace. He surprisingly found the answer was hidden within a daily journal kept while at war, and Bryan's path ultimately led him to find redemption in the most unexpected of places: love. In a genre filled with war novels, Unspoken Abandonment stands out as the work is brilliantly written, in a narrative form, which takes the reader on a breathtaking journey into the heart of Afghanistan. The reader is then taken back to America to face "life after combat." This story takes a head-on look at the powerful effects of war and post traumatic stress, but the true focus is on the inspirational triumph over this demon that haunts hundreds of thousands of America's bravest men and women. The story is captivating, the message is inspiring, and this is a must-read for every American who cares to take an inside look at what our soldiers face on a daily basis. This amazing story will grab your attention immediately, and it is sure to keep you up past your normal bedtime for more than a few late nights of reading. Read a free introductory sample here: http://bryanwoodbooks.com/sample.pdf


Compare

Prepare to walk more than a mile in one soldier's boots as you see exactly what it's like to go to war and face the struggles of coming home. This is as real as it's going to get... Unspoken Abandonment is the story of one man's struggle to return home from the war in Afghanistan, only to find the person he once was may never be the same. Bryan Wood is a military veteran wh Prepare to walk more than a mile in one soldier's boots as you see exactly what it's like to go to war and face the struggles of coming home. This is as real as it's going to get... Unspoken Abandonment is the story of one man's struggle to return home from the war in Afghanistan, only to find the person he once was may never be the same. Bryan Wood is a military veteran who served during combat operations in Eastern Afghanistan. After returning from combat, he found that his life was falling apart at every turn, and Bryan faced the greatest battle of his life in finding his own peace. He surprisingly found the answer was hidden within a daily journal kept while at war, and Bryan's path ultimately led him to find redemption in the most unexpected of places: love. In a genre filled with war novels, Unspoken Abandonment stands out as the work is brilliantly written, in a narrative form, which takes the reader on a breathtaking journey into the heart of Afghanistan. The reader is then taken back to America to face "life after combat." This story takes a head-on look at the powerful effects of war and post traumatic stress, but the true focus is on the inspirational triumph over this demon that haunts hundreds of thousands of America's bravest men and women. The story is captivating, the message is inspiring, and this is a must-read for every American who cares to take an inside look at what our soldiers face on a daily basis. This amazing story will grab your attention immediately, and it is sure to keep you up past your normal bedtime for more than a few late nights of reading. Read a free introductory sample here: http://bryanwoodbooks.com/sample.pdf

30 review for Unspoken Abandonment: Sometimes the hardest part of going to war is coming home

  1. 5 out of 5

    Rhonda

    http://samsawesomness.blogspot.com/20... "I didn’t even realize, but I was quickly going to see, that the person I was before this all started had somehow changed. The way I saw the world was gone, and I saw things, almost everything, in an entirely different way."- Bryan A. Wood Based on a true story. First of all, I want to give a huge “thank you” to Bryan Wood, and every American soldier for the job they do, and the job they have done. I am extremely humbled by all that you do, and endure fo http://samsawesomness.blogspot.com/20... "I didn’t even realize, but I was quickly going to see, that the person I was before this all started had somehow changed. The way I saw the world was gone, and I saw things, almost everything, in an entirely different way."- Bryan A. Wood Based on a true story. First of all, I want to give a huge “thank you” to Bryan Wood, and every American soldier for the job they do, and the job they have done. I am extremely humbled by all that you do, and endure for my freedom, and the freedom of our great country. To our men and women here at home, police officers, and firefighters who put yourselves in harms way to keep us safe, “thank you” to you as well. Next, I would like to say thank you to my friend Jillian for pointing me in the direction of this book, I might not have found it otherwise, as this is not my normal genre. I come from a family that has had its share of veterans, only one of my family members has spent any time in Iraq, my brother-in-law who works for the FBI. After returning home he sent a letter out to all of telling us of his experience there. This was early on in the war in Iraq and I remember how proud I was after reading his letter. He told us of his interactions with the civilians in Iraq, but I’m certain he didn’t tell us everything. Just last month in his early 40’s, my brother-in-law had to retire because he has Parkinson’s disease, and it is has taken over to the point that he can no longer work. My brother was in the Navy during the Gulf War, but has long since been out of the service. I have always had great respect and admiration for our men and women in uniform, but this book left me with a greater sense of pride. Unspoken Abandonment is beautifully written and incredibly insightful. This is the first hand account of Bryan Wood’s tour in Afghanistan, and his very long journey home. I felt a series of emotions while reading this book. I was sad, angry, heartbroken, and hopeful, but the greatest feeling I took away from this book was, inspired. I think there is something that everyone can gain from reading Bryan’s story, even though I’m just a woman from Memphis it certainly made me take a look at myself and see things about myself that could be improved upon. Thank you Bryan for sharing your story, I will always remember.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Jillian Stein

    Let me start out by saying this is so not my typical reading genre…. That being said, I want to urge you all to read this book no matter what you normally read. I am not the same person I was before I started this book. I sat down at 3:00 and was finished by 9 that same day. I couldn’t put this book down. Bryan’s journal entries are unforgettable and in some cases, define all that is unimaginable in the world most of us live in. By page 23, I was crying. I was upset not only for the scenarios Brya Let me start out by saying this is so not my typical reading genre…. That being said, I want to urge you all to read this book no matter what you normally read. I am not the same person I was before I started this book. I sat down at 3:00 and was finished by 9 that same day. I couldn’t put this book down. Bryan’s journal entries are unforgettable and in some cases, define all that is unimaginable in the world most of us live in. By page 23, I was crying. I was upset not only for the scenarios Bryan was depicting, but also for him….the young man who was slowly losing his fresh faced outlook on life and humanity. I cried so many times throughout this book but in no way does that mean I didn’t love it. This story is one of survival…coming back from your own personal Hell and living to tell, and teach, others about it. This was such an eye-opening read. It gives such an in-depth look into what our soldiers are going through. Bryan is truly an inspiration. His outlook on life, and the emotional turmoil he went through to get there, is admirable beyond measure. There are scenes from this book that will stay with me for a very long time….and I can thank Bryan for that, because it makes me want to be a better person and do what I can to make even a small difference in this life. Thank you, Bryan, for sharing your story with us and for a touching and remarkable read. http://darhkportal.com/2012/07/specia...

  3. 5 out of 5

    Linda

    After binge reading a romance series, I was due for a genre change. Even I kind of surprised myself with this pick, since it is so different from my usual reads. This book is a personal account of a soldier who is stationed in Kabul, Afghanistan in 2003. It includes actual journal entries from his time there- which were absolutely astounding. The book continues with the author's account of his time back home. This book was absolutely jaw-dropping. From the journal entries detailing life in Afgha After binge reading a romance series, I was due for a genre change. Even I kind of surprised myself with this pick, since it is so different from my usual reads. This book is a personal account of a soldier who is stationed in Kabul, Afghanistan in 2003. It includes actual journal entries from his time there- which were absolutely astounding. The book continues with the author's account of his time back home. This book was absolutely jaw-dropping. From the journal entries detailing life in Afghanistan, to the rehab facility this soldier recovered in, to the struggles to reconcile all that he experienced with living a normal life back at home...just wow. I will never forget this book! Sometimes, non-fiction reads like fiction. Much of this book does. I promise that if you usually find non-fiction boring, you need to meet this book. It is quick and very readable. I read for lots of reasons. I read to feel, to be entertained, to escape, and to learn. This book made me feel and taught me so much. And though I have always appreciated what those in the service do, I have a new, deeper appreciation for their absolute sacrifice. Thank you Bryan, and all those who serve, for your service, your sacrifice and for sharing your story. Highly recommended to anyone who reads. I own a copy of this eBook

  4. 4 out of 5

    Joseph

    Best book I've read about Afghanistan and the best book I've read in a while ... will expand this review in a day or two. Can't remember the last time I couldn't put a book down, err turn off my Kindle. Need to digest this book a bit more before I give it the review it deserves. (slept on it overnight, review follows) “The tour continued on … with nothing being seen except for the magnitude of extreme poverty. That is when we stumbled upon a woman being beaten by two men. That woman, wearing a dar Best book I've read about Afghanistan and the best book I've read in a while ... will expand this review in a day or two. Can't remember the last time I couldn't put a book down, err turn off my Kindle. Need to digest this book a bit more before I give it the review it deserves. (slept on it overnight, review follows) “The tour continued on … with nothing being seen except for the magnitude of extreme poverty. That is when we stumbled upon a woman being beaten by two men. That woman, wearing a dark blue Burqa, was on her knees and struggling to stand, as one man beat her with a belt and the other pushed her back to the ground. As we drove by this scene, our “guide” told us this was very common in Kabul, and he said, “Try not to let it bother you.” He told us we were going to see a lot of things that would bother us here, but we cannot get involved in this kind of mess. You just have to look the other way.” This is a book about many things: a young soldier experiencing war in Afghanistan, how he ‘copes’ with that war, the stresses he endures, the people he serves with, the people who are Afghanistan – who they are and how they live, injustice, culture shock, how he was torn up by the war and ultimately how he is able to put his life back together. The book had me from the get go quite simply because it is compelling. Yes, I brought myself, the old Vietnam vet, to the reading and among my initial reactions was the thought those who served and who now serve in Afghanistan have a much tougher go of it than many of us who did Vietnam tours, not that Vietnam was a piece of cake, it certainly was not. My second thoughts were of my son who is in Afghanistan right now. The book has much strength. After 27 years in the Air Force, I taught high school for ten years, among other things US History. It was a way to give back. Searched for things on Vietnam that would mean something to young people, what you might call Vietnam War literature – poetry, firsthand accounts, stuff that they could relate to. If I were still teaching, I'd use this book to teach about our involvement in Afghanistan. Have read a few books about Afghanistan, most recently “No Easy Day” but, this is the first book I would call Afghanistan war literature. It conveys an all too real sense of what it was like to have been there as a 'grunt.' It viscerally connects us as readers with the author as a soldier and with the soldiers and Afghanis with whom he ‘served.’ I chose the sword ‘served’ advisedly; I almost used the word ‘endured.’ Strength is the author’s gift of empathy. Through his capacity and desire to know something of what it is like to be an Afghani the book gives us -- perhaps more than the author realizes -- a sense of what it is like to have been born there, to live there and how tough life is there. As I read through his recounting of some of the things he saw, I relearned an old lesson. We Americans live in a cocoon. We worry about things like buying a new Kindle, whether or not we can afford an expensive restaurant, a Facebook post that offended us, a mortgage and so on. We are – for lack of better words – a ‘first’ world country. We do not have enough capacity to understand a place like Afghanistan. We lack the initiative and desire to understand other countries, particularly Muslim countries. This is the first book I've read about Afghanistan that provides a feel for daily life there. Yeah, it's gut wrenching and there is stuff that just rips your heart out. The book is apolitical. It does not take sides. It is nonjudgmental, with the exception that the author judges himself. The fact that the book is nonjudgmental might just be its greatest strength. This is an incredibly honest book. The author bares his soul. Life has a way of humbling us all if we live long enough. It takes a while, but the author rebuilds his life. It could not have been easy. Think it was Socrates who said the “unexamined life is not worth living.” Afghanistan forced Bryan Wood to examine his life and his assumptions about life. We who read his book are better for Bryan’s having done that.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Aqsa

    Read Ana's review that almost made me cry: https://www.goodreads.com/review/show... Read Ana's review that almost made me cry: https://www.goodreads.com/review/show...

  6. 4 out of 5

    Natasha

    This is the most difficulty I’ve ever had to write a review. This book was amazing and deserves a review and I’ve thought about what I want to write all day long, but I’m still at a loss for words. Why? I have never read anything this touching and this personal. How do I do this book justice, keep my review objective and keep all my opinions about the war and some of the 'characters' aside? Trust me, I got emotional and very worked up about a lot of stuff in this book, but I'm not going to talk This is the most difficulty I’ve ever had to write a review. This book was amazing and deserves a review and I’ve thought about what I want to write all day long, but I’m still at a loss for words. Why? I have never read anything this touching and this personal. How do I do this book justice, keep my review objective and keep all my opinions about the war and some of the 'characters' aside? Trust me, I got emotional and very worked up about a lot of stuff in this book, but I'm not going to talk about any of that in my review. This book is about Bryan Wood that is sent to Eastern Afghanistan for a 6 month deployment. He kept a journal while there and shares that journal word for word in the book. The journal is a daily account of his time there: his life at Camp Eagle and the military missions & patrols they went on, info about the life of locals and what they endure, background about the war, etc. Nearly every day had accounts of life threatening action. I can’t even begin to understand how it must feel to wake up to that every day and not if it’s going to be your last day. How do you stay motivated and not fall into depression? “I could not help but wonder how many times you can tempt fate and still walk away. How many times can you keep pulling straws before you finally pull the short one? I wonder if I am really going to get through this. The accounts of what he saw done to the locals are completely heart-breaking. I had tears run down my face from just reading it…. Experiencing it and being ordered to turn a blind eye to it, unimaginable! It has made me realize how incredibly grateful I must be that I was not born in an oppressed country like that. “I cannot understand how I was so blessed to be born into something so much better, and until this experience, I have never appreciated any of it.” As a reader, I could feel his mood get darker and darker in his journal entries. He started to become numb to all the violence that surrounded him (“I think it is an internal defence to dehumanize these situations to make them easier to deal with.”). After a while he just stops writing in his journal completely. “This will be the last night I write in this thing. I have already written about more than I ever care to remember, and I really do not see a point to it anymore. I am done.” After sustaining an injury in Afghanistan, he was sent to Fort Drum in New York for recovery and to serve the rest of his term. The conditions there made that even more unbearable for him and he started wishing he was rather back in the war. After his term was done he returns to his live and tries to pick up where he left of, but it is not easy. You can’t ever un-see stuff you have seen. “The way I saw the world was gone, and I saw things, almost everything, in an entirely different way. It was now time to face this fact, and I needed to adjust to life in an entirely new reality.” “Going from war to everyday life turned out to be much more complicated than it was for me to go from everyday life to war. I searched desperately for the metaphorical light switch that would just turn that part of my life off for good, but such a switch simply doesn’t exist.” The war changed him and there was no time to process everything that he has seen and endured. He felt like nobody understood what he went through and felt alone and isolated. He built up major walls around himself and became a master at hiding his problems and covered everything up with laughter and sarcasm. Somebody he barely knew broke through to him and thank God he followed the advice and started facing his demons. For the first time he tried to process his experience and feelings about what he endured. The transformation is not something that happens overnight. It takes time, but he made the choice that he wanted to change and got the help he needed. He does get his happy ending and it made me smile like you won’t believe ;) “I promised to never again take a single day for granted. I promised to always strive to be a kinder, gentler, and more understanding person. I promised to enjoy life to its fullest, and make the most of every opportunity and blessing I am given. I promised to stop worrying about the incidental, truly unimportant details we all burden ourselves with on a daily basis. Most importantly, I then promised to never again give my love and affection to anyone who did not purely and honestly deserve it.” This book was powerful and it really makes you think about your life and how incredibly insignificant your problems are. This does not read as a self-help book and it does not come across as 'preachy' - it just reads as a guy’s honest account of what he endured and how he overcame the resulting PTSD. I hope that other people that read this also find the strength like he did to face their problems. There is always light at the end of the tunnel … “No matter what life brings to me, I know I will always find a way to get by. I, like everyone else, have no way of knowing what tomorrow is going to bring, but I do know I will always have the strength to get through it. I will never quit, I will never surrender, and I will always prevail.” Amen.

  7. 4 out of 5

    GraceMyBookSnack

    A must-read memoir! Out of curiosity and upon a friend's recommendation, I started reading Unspoken Abandonment even though it's not my usual genre. From beginning to end, I was captivated by Mr. Wood's journey while serving in Afghanistan, and then trying to live and cope after returning home. He writes with an incredible flair of compassion and raw honesty as he describes horrific and shocking events in his journal entries, events that will be forever ingrained in my mind. After reading this, I A must-read memoir! Out of curiosity and upon a friend's recommendation, I started reading Unspoken Abandonment even though it's not my usual genre. From beginning to end, I was captivated by Mr. Wood's journey while serving in Afghanistan, and then trying to live and cope after returning home. He writes with an incredible flair of compassion and raw honesty as he describes horrific and shocking events in his journal entries, events that will be forever ingrained in my mind. After reading this, I have a clearer understanding of not only the challenges our soldiers endure during war and after returning home, but also what all the innocent people and children go through to survive a hell on earth! This poignant memoir reminded me to not take things for granted and to always strive to be a better person. Every once in a while we all need to be reminded of that as we go about our busy lives. This story does just that and more. I urge anyone to read this, be moved, and then tell a friend about it. Thank you, Mr. Wood, for sharing your inspiring story.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Tiffany Tabor

    **I can still hear his words as if they were spoken just yesterday, “If you try to do only for yourself, you’ll only get so far in life. If you reach out to touch other people, you can fix your own soul…”** Charles to Bryan Unspoken Abandonment by Bryan A. Wood had come highly recommended to me by my dear friend, Jillian. It was literally a “stop-what-you-are-reading-and-read-this-book-right-now” kind of recommendation. She told me it was definitely not our normal genre of PNR and romance/suspens **I can still hear his words as if they were spoken just yesterday, “If you try to do only for yourself, you’ll only get so far in life. If you reach out to touch other people, you can fix your own soul…”** Charles to Bryan Unspoken Abandonment by Bryan A. Wood had come highly recommended to me by my dear friend, Jillian. It was literally a “stop-what-you-are-reading-and-read-this-book-right-now” kind of recommendation. She told me it was definitely not our normal genre of PNR and romance/suspense, but that was really all she said. Of course, I went right out to research the book. Truth be told, when I read the synopsis I thought “True story? War veteran? Memoirs? Struggle with coming home? Really? What is Jilly thinking?” That probably sounds awful, I know, but it’s the truth. I had never even read any book about war…fiction or nonfiction. But I have learned to trust my friend and her book recommendations and I have never been more grateful that I listened this time. I’m not the best at writing reviews. I struggle to express how books really make me feel. There is NO WAY I can give Bryan and this book the review it deserves, but I’m going to try. Unspoken Abandonment is a book about war, however the war Bryan fought in in Afghanistan was only one war he survived, the second being (and maybe even the harder of the two in my opinion) coming home and fighting to return to his “normal” life. To me the book has three distinct segments. The first being his journal entries from his time in Bagram, Afghanistan. Bryan journals his experience each day while on patrol and on different missions. Again, I’ll admit, I know nothing about what truly happens “over there.” But reading the things Bryan experienced made me realize I am ignorant about how life is in Afghanistan, what our troops see daily but can do nothing about and how close they come to dying no matter what they are doing. I’ll leave the details for you to read, but have a box of Kleenex ready. You will hurt and cry for Bryan and the struggles that start taking shape in his life as he serves our country. And you will never look at a black backpack or something as simple as a ballcap the same again. (Bryan, I have a backpack with your name on it.) The second segment is when he returns home and the struggles that took shape in Afghanistan become full blown when he tries to return to the life he had before. He quickly learns that the normal life he once had cannot be found and the relationships he had before being deployed aren’t the same and never would be again. This brings me to the third and final segment of the book and the reason I used the quote I did at the first of this review, Bryan taking his life back. Not the one prior to leaving but the life he was meant to live once he came back. The quote comes from a conversation he has with an unlikely acquaintance and it is what changes his outlook and it is where his healing starts. No quote has ever rang truer or made such an impact on my life as this one. If you read no other book, read this one. It will change your life. Bryan, you have reached out and touched my life, and from reading the other reviews of your incredible story, you have touched many others as well. Thank you for serving our country and protecting everything I hold dear in my life. Thank you for opening my eyes to a world I know so little about. But mostly, thank you for sharing the struggles you had and how you reclaimed your life.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Radostina

    Unspoken Abandonment tells a story so typical--a story that any soldier might have told--and yet so very personal and unique that by the end of the book I felt I've known author Bryan Wood forever. War has this way of depersonalizing its victims, both civilian and military; we are so used to hearing about it in terms of numbers and dry statistics that we often fail to realize how many anonymous lives have been shattered to serve purposes that at best can be called unclear. Bryan Wood's writing is Unspoken Abandonment tells a story so typical--a story that any soldier might have told--and yet so very personal and unique that by the end of the book I felt I've known author Bryan Wood forever. War has this way of depersonalizing its victims, both civilian and military; we are so used to hearing about it in terms of numbers and dry statistics that we often fail to realize how many anonymous lives have been shattered to serve purposes that at best can be called unclear. Bryan Wood's writing is lucid and easy to follow, his story--straight-forward and bearing an immense emotional charge. He has managed to brilliantly recount both the horrors of war and the uncertainties awaiting veterans back home. He writes about survival and coping, rebuilding life from scratch, finding strength and hope again. In this sense, Unspoken Abandonment is truly inspirational. It also raises quite a few moral issues, so it's much more than one person's account of his war experience. This book had a special appeal to me because someone I know was deployed to Iraq--apart from my personal bias, though, it is a really worthy read and I heartily recommend it.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Ramona

    Unspoken Abandonment is one of those books that "love the book" is not the appropriate term to use. I am so glad I read this book, and feel it's a must read for family & friends of anyone who has been deployed in the military and for returning soldiers who knows or thinks they may have PTSD & anyone who cares about them. PTSD can be prevalent in soldiers who have served & we as a nation need to be more aware of its symptoms & not only be able to, but willing to show our support in any way needed Unspoken Abandonment is one of those books that "love the book" is not the appropriate term to use. I am so glad I read this book, and feel it's a must read for family & friends of anyone who has been deployed in the military and for returning soldiers who knows or thinks they may have PTSD & anyone who cares about them. PTSD can be prevalent in soldiers who have served & we as a nation need to be more aware of its symptoms & not only be able to, but willing to show our support in any way needed. Thanks to Bryan for sharing his story. A very moving story that for me could only be read in small increments. I highly recommend it for any adult who considers him or herself an American Citizen. I'm not sharing details from Bryan's book in this review on purpose because I feel it's a book that one must experience in their own way with little prior information.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Wendy

    This was an incredible book. I am still thinking about it. What courage Bryan Woods has shown by writing this book. I know that he has helped many people understand what it is like to go to war then have to come home and adjust. That's all I can say is that he is an amazing and incredible man. Thank you Bryan even though thank you doesn't seem to be nearly enough. I am recommending this book to everyone that I know. This was an incredible book. I am still thinking about it. What courage Bryan Woods has shown by writing this book. I know that he has helped many people understand what it is like to go to war then have to come home and adjust. That's all I can say is that he is an amazing and incredible man. Thank you Bryan even though thank you doesn't seem to be nearly enough. I am recommending this book to everyone that I know.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Elizabeth (Stuffed Shelves)

    What is the book about? Bryan Wood deploys to Eastern Afghanistan not knowing what to expect or what the final outcome may be. A personal journal becomes his companion as he lives every day in the midst of war. As you read his journal you will be taken through his story, see the things he saw, and feel the things he felt. A truly moving book that will open your eyes to the conflict in Afghanistan. You'll be taken back to understand the extreme effects war has on a person on their recovery as he co What is the book about? Bryan Wood deploys to Eastern Afghanistan not knowing what to expect or what the final outcome may be. A personal journal becomes his companion as he lives every day in the midst of war. As you read his journal you will be taken through his story, see the things he saw, and feel the things he felt. A truly moving book that will open your eyes to the conflict in Afghanistan. You'll be taken back to understand the extreme effects war has on a person on their recovery as he comes back to the states, and finds inspiration through others around him to get past his pain. This is an amazing book that completely opens up the mind to understand what veterans experience on their return back home from war. What did I think of the book? What a page turner. I couldn't put it down from the moment I picked it up. The path that Bryan takes to finding himself is absolutely amazing. Wood is an amazingly strong person to be able to go find peace and love through his transition from soldier to veteran. This is a book of overcoming obstacles and finding true love and peace. Unlike any other war story you will ever read. My favorite quotes from the book "I've seen a lot of hurt in my life, and I know what it looks like. There is just something you can see in a person's eyes. No offense, brother, but I am seeing a lot it when I look at you. I can't walk away from that without asking you if you really are ok." "You know what? You're probably right when you say I wouldn't understand because no matter what i's from, your hurt is different from my hurt, and hell, it's all different from that guy's hurt," "I know it's hard to open up about something, but it's the first step to letting go. Hiding from pain only allows it to grow strong and stronger. It's like a beast that feeds off of you. It feeds off of you until you actually become the beast." "Because, I learned something a long time ago: if you try to do only for yourself, you'll only get so far in life. If you reach out to touch other people, you can fix your own soul and move further than you can ever imagine." "For the good, the bad, and everything in between, everything changes and moves on." "One of the things I have learned throughout this entire process is that when you beat yourself up over something internally, you eventually come to accept negativity from outside sources as also being acceptable. After all, it you treat yourself like shit, it must be perfectly fine for others to do the same."

  13. 5 out of 5

    Courtney

    I have never had a harder time writing a review than I did with this book. And it's not because the book was bad - it was FAR from it. I just can't seem to find any words to give this book justice. Bryan gives us a look inside what it was like to be in Eastern Afghanistan. We learn about what days were like for him and horrible things that he had to witness. It is a truly compelling read and visualzing everything that he went through there. "Seeing things like this on television or movies is I have never had a harder time writing a review than I did with this book. And it's not because the book was bad - it was FAR from it. I just can't seem to find any words to give this book justice. Bryan gives us a look inside what it was like to be in Eastern Afghanistan. We learn about what days were like for him and horrible things that he had to witness. It is a truly compelling read and visualzing everything that he went through there. "Seeing things like this on television or movies is one thing, but when it is right in front of your face, day in and day out, it is something completely different. The part that scares me is I feel like I'm growing numb to it all." But this book isn't just about his deployment there. Yes, we get to read his journal that he wrote in daily while deployed there. But it's the parts about him coming back stateside and then finally going home that really get to you. Bryan went through so much, not just in Afghanistan, but when he came back stateside. It amazes what our injured vets have to deal with and how little help they truly get. This book puts into perspective what life is really about and how much we take for granted. "I know now that at the end of the day, it is all what you make of it. I said it at the very beginning: you will certainly face challenges in your life, but it is how you face and overcome these challenges that will ultimately define you as a person." Bryan is truly an inspiration to all of us. This isn't a "how to" guide or anything like that. It just an every day guy's personal view of what he lived through in Afghanistan, his battle with PTSD and how he was able to overcome that and move on and where he is now. Bryan speaks from the heart. It's 200+ pages of gut wrenching honesty. “No matter what life brings to me, I know I will always find a way to get by. I, like everyone else, have no way of knowing what tomorrow is going to bring, but I do know I will always have the strength to get through it. I will never quit, I will never surrender, and I will always prevail.” Bryan - Thank you for your service and for bearing your soul to all of us. I have never been so touched by a book before. You truly opened my eyes!

  14. 5 out of 5

    Lisa Skabrat

    Bryan Wood’s vulnerability in Unspoken Abandonment is a gift to all of us. He not only shares his experiences in the war zone of Afghanistan, but he allows us to hear his heart speak about what he witnessed. This book should be required reading in every high school in America. From the grass-roots up we need to try to understand the sacrifices our soldiers make for our freedoms so we will not only welcome them home but honor them for all they have done. In addition, Unspoken Abandonment is a powe Bryan Wood’s vulnerability in Unspoken Abandonment is a gift to all of us. He not only shares his experiences in the war zone of Afghanistan, but he allows us to hear his heart speak about what he witnessed. This book should be required reading in every high school in America. From the grass-roots up we need to try to understand the sacrifices our soldiers make for our freedoms so we will not only welcome them home but honor them for all they have done. In addition, Unspoken Abandonment is a powerful tool for men and women across this great nation who have returned home to discover they have changed and there’s no going back. Their friends and family will also benefit from reading it as they prepare to face these new challenges with their soldier. Nothing explains the dailiness of life in a war zone like a personal journal. Some may argue that the days when nothing eventful happened should be deleted from the manuscript saying they serve no purpose. I would disagree. Wood allows us to see the extremes of monotony vs intensity by including the mundane. “Once again, hours and days of utter boredom sandwiching seconds of pure terror; that is life in Afghanistan.” He also refuses to write about some things expressing that they were too terrible to record. Saying nothings tells us a great deal. Wood expresses the extremes of emotion as he describes terror, deep sadness, and memories he believes no one can possible understand. He brings the realities alive with the odor of his trunk – a memory so strong he can smell it. But sharing the experience isn’t all Wood has done here. He has also allowed us to see his process of healing. That gives hope to all of us. As our soldiers struggle to recover, we as a nation must support those who have sacrificed so much for freedom. Bryan learned from Charlie, “if you try to do only for yourself, you’ll only get so far in life. If you reach out to touch other people, you can fix your own soul.” Bryan took that seriously and shared his story with the world. His story has the power to bring healing to other soldiers and their families and so many more.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Lauren Mayet

    First off, I have to tell you that I usually don't read books on this subject, but I have to say that I am sure glad I did. This book wasn't about being a Democrat or Republican or any other political party. I wasn't about whether you are for or against the war either. This is story of one man's journey to get back to "normal," whatever normal may be. They review may go over many edits over the next few days as what I read sinks in and I have more time to think about what I actually read. I am t First off, I have to tell you that I usually don't read books on this subject, but I have to say that I am sure glad I did. This book wasn't about being a Democrat or Republican or any other political party. I wasn't about whether you are for or against the war either. This is story of one man's journey to get back to "normal," whatever normal may be. They review may go over many edits over the next few days as what I read sinks in and I have more time to think about what I actually read. I am taking a quote from this book because it sums something I want to say, "things like this in television or movies is one thing, but when it is right in front of your face, day in and day out, it is something completely different." Wood, Bryan (2012-02-16). Unspoken Abandonment (p. 69). . Kindle Edition. I know that I will never truly understand what Mr. Wood and other soldiers like him went through, because I have never been their and I know I will never have the opportunity to know what being a soldier is like, cause frankly, I know I cannot do it. As I sat watching the Olympics while reading I found myself tearing up at some parts while silently really thinking about what I was reading. I found myself learning a little bit more about myself and the person I want to be in the future. I will not give away anything about this story cause I think everyone should read it. This story of one man's journey truly effected me as a person and as an American. So all I ask is that you please read it and decide for yourself. Lastly, I want to thank Mr. Wood for telling your story and putting it out there for the world to see and read. I also have to thank the soldiers in all the branches of the military and in other countries for giving up and sacrificing parts of their lives so that people like me and rest of Americans can live in the "home of the free and the brave." Thank You

  16. 5 out of 5

    Gerry

    A book that covers the individual US Army Soldier's existence in a place where it would seem that "time forgot" and maybe more likely the world simply ignored. In my view this book also in many ways covers the existence of any service member regardless of Branch, Mr. Wood could have been a Marine, Navy Seal, Air Force Pararescue Member or any not referenced within. Mr. Wood reached within the depths of his soul to survive this onslaught - he represents (to me) all of us who have ever wanted to d A book that covers the individual US Army Soldier's existence in a place where it would seem that "time forgot" and maybe more likely the world simply ignored. In my view this book also in many ways covers the existence of any service member regardless of Branch, Mr. Wood could have been a Marine, Navy Seal, Air Force Pararescue Member or any not referenced within. Mr. Wood reached within the depths of his soul to survive this onslaught - he represents (to me) all of us who have ever wanted to do good, be brave, serve our country and in the process he questions (as anyone would given his experiences and efforts) to maintain the decency of that same existence. Please note that I for one think this book, this masterpiece is not for the faint of heart and there was much despair, loss, courage, fear, desperation, self awareness, ability to overcome, and in the end acceptance and love. I hope in the future that Mr. Wood will come to add to this book (as long as it wouldn't be a painful experience) futher detail and maybe even adjoining Policy to his specific time frame while serving abroad as much as Dr. Bernard Fall did in "Hell In A Very Small Place" (thereby for future generations they can in fact go back and link the history of activity to events on the ground and see matters from an even wider prism as that person reads of the individual account). I am thankful that Mr. Wood has shared his story - I have a sense this work will help many disturbed veterans past, present, and in the future. Human beings can be the most inhumane beings on the face of this planet.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Chantelle

    Spellbinding. Raw and real. Bryan's journal from his deployment in Afghanistan in 2003 is by turns heartbreaking and heartwarming. His writing made me feel as if I was there alongside him, experiencing what he experienced. I cried for some of the Afghani people when he described their situations. I want to go back in time and send him a care package with a backpack. Coming home was no sweet homecoming for Bryan either - and that part was just as hard to read. Not only was this a gripping first-p Spellbinding. Raw and real. Bryan's journal from his deployment in Afghanistan in 2003 is by turns heartbreaking and heartwarming. His writing made me feel as if I was there alongside him, experiencing what he experienced. I cried for some of the Afghani people when he described their situations. I want to go back in time and send him a care package with a backpack. Coming home was no sweet homecoming for Bryan either - and that part was just as hard to read. Not only was this a gripping first-person account of just one of so many deployed servicepeople all over the world, specifically in the Middle East, but it was also an excellent reminder to its readers to be thankful for and proud of those who serve. Thank you, Bryan.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Yury

    Loved this book his story had you up and down with him. Even though i was not there with Bryan but i can feel the fear, sadness and so much anger and at the end his happiness. I recommend this book to everyone you will love his book. :)

  19. 5 out of 5

    Sarah R

    I've read a lot of military memoirs over the last decade, and quite a few about Iraq and Afghanistan. It's one of my favorite book genres. This could sound rather odd considering my husband is a U.S. soldier, but I'm one of the (probably minority) military wives who would rather know what happens over there than not. You can't really prepare for something you know nothing about. With that said, I've had this book on my to-read shelf for awhile now, after running into the author here on Goodreads I've read a lot of military memoirs over the last decade, and quite a few about Iraq and Afghanistan. It's one of my favorite book genres. This could sound rather odd considering my husband is a U.S. soldier, but I'm one of the (probably minority) military wives who would rather know what happens over there than not. You can't really prepare for something you know nothing about. With that said, I've had this book on my to-read shelf for awhile now, after running into the author here on Goodreads, and was kind of avoiding reading it. For one thing, my husband is heading over there in the not-too-far future and I've been struggling enough with the thought without adding anything else to it. But I finally started it last week, figuring it would be easier to read it while he was still here than wait til he's gone. I was sucked in from the very first page. Bryan is an excellent writer. I don't remember any other war memoir that made me feel like I was right there like this one did. His descriptions paint every scene in vivid detail; it was like watching a movie. Some memoir authors get so militarily technical or so "down and dirty" that you become detached from the story, but not this one. It's simple, blunt, and real. Even though I couldn't put it down, it was certainly not easy reading. My heart hurt over the descriptions of the plight of the Afghan people, especially the children. Americans have NO idea how good we have it. I got very angry over the way his wife treated him (though I definitely appreciated the fact that he kept her out of the story as much as possible); when my husband was deployed a few years ago, anything he even hinted at wanting got put in the mail to him the very next day, and it's hard for me to imagine a military wife who refused to do the same. The only thing that kept me from completely breaking down over some parts was my mistake to take my Kindle with me to public places. Bryan's experiences upon returning from Afghanistan would be important for anyone to read who has a servicemember in their life, no matter in what capacity. I appreciated his honesty about his struggles and also his humility. He doesn't write with a victim mentality; he just tells it like it was. I think every veteran's journey back to wholeness is going to be different, but without doubt most of them struggle with similar things, and I feel like I will be a better support to my soldier after having read Bryan's story. So, many thanks to him for putting himself out there!

  20. 5 out of 5

    Ginger Myrick

    This book is extraordinary. Unspoken Abandonment is a brutally honest account of a young soldier's time in Afghanistan. It is well-written with a flowing and facile prose. There is surprisingly little editing needed, which is astounding for the fact that it is basically a journal penned during a time of extreme duress. This can only be attributed to the author's superior writing skills and ability to relate information most important to his readers. My son did two tours in Iraq, and until I read This book is extraordinary. Unspoken Abandonment is a brutally honest account of a young soldier's time in Afghanistan. It is well-written with a flowing and facile prose. There is surprisingly little editing needed, which is astounding for the fact that it is basically a journal penned during a time of extreme duress. This can only be attributed to the author's superior writing skills and ability to relate information most important to his readers. My son did two tours in Iraq, and until I read Unspoken Abandonment, I could not begin to understand what he went through. It is impossible to imagine and painful to witness. And even though we venture out of our personal comfort zone and into foreign territory enough to read the story, we are doing so in the security of our own homes, the security paid for by the sacrifice of valiant young men and women who sought to make a difference and have. We can never know what it really feels like, but I believe that EVERYBODY should read this book to at least have an idea. I have said this before, but I cannot express it enough. Thank you, Bryan Wood, Kevin Hanrahan, J. Cristian Ramirez, Tyson Carl, Eli Bartlett, Iain Orr, Jim and Greg Glenn, and all other veterans and active members of our military from the bottom of my heart for your sacrifice and that of your families. It is ONLY because of men and women of your caliber that the rest of us can sleep safely at night. I will be forever grateful. I look forward to future work from this remarkable young man.

  21. 4 out of 5

    David Thompson

    A few notes on "Unspoken Abandonment" by Bryan Wood. Bottom line: Wood takes a brief journal "journey" and is able to comprehensively expand the story to let readers see how that initial experience in Afghanistan in 2003 impacted his life. Many OIF and OEF veterans kept a regular written account of their experiences--myself included. However, Wood is able to bring that simple writing experience into relevance several years later as he attempts to cope with the aftermath of his exposure to combat A few notes on "Unspoken Abandonment" by Bryan Wood. Bottom line: Wood takes a brief journal "journey" and is able to comprehensively expand the story to let readers see how that initial experience in Afghanistan in 2003 impacted his life. Many OIF and OEF veterans kept a regular written account of their experiences--myself included. However, Wood is able to bring that simple writing experience into relevance several years later as he attempts to cope with the aftermath of his exposure to combat operations. The reality of PTSD is that it is exclusively a human endeavor with unpredictable conditions. For one, the treatment may be simple; for others, that treatment can be a ongoing experience with inconsistent results. One method of coping is writing to bring out what is bottled up inside and either try to make sense out of it all, or release it. "Unspoken Abandonment" is broken into six chapters---easily distinguishable phases starting with his arrival in Kabul and working chronologically through a point where he makes peace with himself. Reading everything in-between is relatively quick and painless. For the average civilian with little exposure to operations in Iraq or Afghanistan, the book will not be difficult to get through. For the average OIF or OEF veteran, you will certainly find some similarities to your experience and may identify a technique or two to deal with making sense of what you went through.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Christina White

    Unspoken Abandonment is the story of a young man that went to war, witnessed unimaginable tragedy, and then suffered for years with the horrible memories of it all. He found relief in writing and used it to help him get rid of the guilt he was caring around with him. I found the journal entries to be very interesting and wanted more of them. Some of them had my jaw dropping to the floor and others had me furious. Reading about how he readjusted once he got back didn't grab my attention quite as m Unspoken Abandonment is the story of a young man that went to war, witnessed unimaginable tragedy, and then suffered for years with the horrible memories of it all. He found relief in writing and used it to help him get rid of the guilt he was caring around with him. I found the journal entries to be very interesting and wanted more of them. Some of them had my jaw dropping to the floor and others had me furious. Reading about how he readjusted once he got back didn't grab my attention quite as much, but it did make me wonder why we didn't do more for our troops when they came home. We need to do more. I felt my eyes watering constantly during the last fourth of the book. I wish there was more Abby! I wanted to read more about their love story... more about how they met and how they fell in love. Love this at the end: "I will never quit, I will never surrender, and I will always prevail." Words from a true soldier!

  23. 4 out of 5

    Tonya V

    While reading "Unspoken Abandonment" by Bryan A. Wood, I was blown away by the many injustices he witnessed and resulting experiences while serving in Afghanistan. Wood, gives the reader an inside glimpse of what life was like while serving over seas and his adjustment upon returning home. Reading his documented experiences really made me more aware of how we take so many things in life for granted. I highly recommend this book for those who have spouses, family members and friends who have serve While reading "Unspoken Abandonment" by Bryan A. Wood, I was blown away by the many injustices he witnessed and resulting experiences while serving in Afghanistan. Wood, gives the reader an inside glimpse of what life was like while serving over seas and his adjustment upon returning home. Reading his documented experiences really made me more aware of how we take so many things in life for granted. I highly recommend this book for those who have spouses, family members and friends who have served our country. Wood's book could be used as a tool to help some of our veterans cope with and understand what they may be experiencing when they return home.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Scott Collins

    Unspoken Abandonment is the story of a veteran and his struggle to readapt to civilian life after a tour in Afghanistan. Reading Mr. Wood's journal was heartbreaking as was the tale of his difficulties in dealing what what he'd seen overseas. It wasn't until he'd lost almost everything that he finally found a person who saw through his facade and called him out. Mr. Wood eventually worked through his troubles and reassembled his life. I wish him continued success and pray that this book can help Unspoken Abandonment is the story of a veteran and his struggle to readapt to civilian life after a tour in Afghanistan. Reading Mr. Wood's journal was heartbreaking as was the tale of his difficulties in dealing what what he'd seen overseas. It wasn't until he'd lost almost everything that he finally found a person who saw through his facade and called him out. Mr. Wood eventually worked through his troubles and reassembled his life. I wish him continued success and pray that this book can help others having the same difficulties. Thank you Bryan for sharing your experiences. May it open people's eyes to the sacrifices that have been made.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Holly

    Just finished reading, Unspoken Abandonment by Brian A. Wood. It's an amazing biography of a soldier, including his daily journal he wrote while serving in Afghanistan. Then his later struggle with PTSD. For me it was a complete eye opener to the horrors going on over there and what our brave soldiers are witnessing and even worse, the inhumanity they can to nothing about. I think every adult should read this. Just finished reading, Unspoken Abandonment by Brian A. Wood. It's an amazing biography of a soldier, including his daily journal he wrote while serving in Afghanistan. Then his later struggle with PTSD. For me it was a complete eye opener to the horrors going on over there and what our brave soldiers are witnessing and even worse, the inhumanity they can to nothing about. I think every adult should read this.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Peggy

    All I can say is thank you. Thank you for your service, thank you for sharing your story and giving others a glimpse of what our soldiers endure. There are many who may make it back alive, but I don't believe any come back uninjured. Bryan found a way not only to find healing, but to share it with others. I was deeply touched by this book. All I can say is thank you. Thank you for your service, thank you for sharing your story and giving others a glimpse of what our soldiers endure. There are many who may make it back alive, but I don't believe any come back uninjured. Bryan found a way not only to find healing, but to share it with others. I was deeply touched by this book.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Parreads

    I enjoyed it-this is a very intense book. The author buys a black and white composition book before he is deployed to Afghanistan so that he can write about his experiences. This is a good book and you should read it so that you can attempt to understand what our servicemen and women go through in the field and in their homecoming experinces. I would read it again.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Lynette Barfield

    I thought that the book was well written, his problems were probably typical of others returning from military duty, and i felt the passion in the narrative. My only problem was with the lack of conversation after the diary. Frankly, I just got bored. I think it is a good first attempt. Keep it up.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Lea

    Loved this book and whilst i thought it skimmed over a lot.... it really made me think. A wonderful read and after all this man has been through he is allowed to say or not say what he wants. I liked the fact that he kept his wife out of the book - showed a lot of respect

  30. 4 out of 5

    B

    Fantastic book. Starts out a bit forced, but quickly you realize this is a very personal account of what our guys see every day in Afghanistan. It's the most detailed account I have read on this topic. In addition, it's a great story of personal challenge and triumph. A very fast read. Fantastic book. Starts out a bit forced, but quickly you realize this is a very personal account of what our guys see every day in Afghanistan. It's the most detailed account I have read on this topic. In addition, it's a great story of personal challenge and triumph. A very fast read.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...