hits counter A Princess of Mars: A Graphic Novel - Ebook PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

A Princess of Mars: A Graphic Novel

Availability: Ready to download

Action-packed, adventure-filled, and featuring an unforgettable alien landscape, "A Princess of Mars" is tailor-made for the graphic novel format. Edgar Rice Burroughs's futuristic story, first serialized a century ago, influenced generations of science fiction writers. When Earth-born Captain John Carter is transported to Mars, he quickly rises to become a powerful chieft Action-packed, adventure-filled, and featuring an unforgettable alien landscape, "A Princess of Mars" is tailor-made for the graphic novel format. Edgar Rice Burroughs's futuristic story, first serialized a century ago, influenced generations of science fiction writers. When Earth-born Captain John Carter is transported to Mars, he quickly rises to become a powerful chieftain- and finds himself caught in the middle of a deadly war raging accross the planet...and a dangerous romance with a divine princess.


Compare

Action-packed, adventure-filled, and featuring an unforgettable alien landscape, "A Princess of Mars" is tailor-made for the graphic novel format. Edgar Rice Burroughs's futuristic story, first serialized a century ago, influenced generations of science fiction writers. When Earth-born Captain John Carter is transported to Mars, he quickly rises to become a powerful chieft Action-packed, adventure-filled, and featuring an unforgettable alien landscape, "A Princess of Mars" is tailor-made for the graphic novel format. Edgar Rice Burroughs's futuristic story, first serialized a century ago, influenced generations of science fiction writers. When Earth-born Captain John Carter is transported to Mars, he quickly rises to become a powerful chieftain- and finds himself caught in the middle of a deadly war raging accross the planet...and a dangerous romance with a divine princess.

30 review for A Princess of Mars: A Graphic Novel

  1. 5 out of 5

    Andy

    Quick synopsis from Wikipedia: "John Carter, a Confederate veteran of the American Civil War, goes prospecting in Arizona immediately after the war's end. Having struck a rich vein of gold, he runs afoul of the Apaches. While attempting to evade pursuit by hiding in a sacred cave, he is mysteriously transported to Mars, called "Barsoom" by its inhabitants. Carter finds that he has great strength and superhuman agility in this new environment as a result of its lesser gravity. He soon falls in wit Quick synopsis from Wikipedia: "John Carter, a Confederate veteran of the American Civil War, goes prospecting in Arizona immediately after the war's end. Having struck a rich vein of gold, he runs afoul of the Apaches. While attempting to evade pursuit by hiding in a sacred cave, he is mysteriously transported to Mars, called "Barsoom" by its inhabitants. Carter finds that he has great strength and superhuman agility in this new environment as a result of its lesser gravity. He soon falls in with a nomadic tribe of Green Martians, or Tharks, as the planet's warlike, six-limbed, green-skinned inhabitants are known. Thanks to his strength and martial prowess, Carter rises to a high position in the tribe and earns the respect and eventually the friendship of Tars Tarkas, one of the Thark chiefs." Now, I am very familiar with the original story by Edgar Rice Burroughs, having read the book (a couple of times) in the run up to the recent John Carter movie adaptation directed by Andrew Stanton, as well as the Dynamite comic book series, Warlord Of Mars. I was looking forward to this adaptation by Ian Edginton and illustrated by INJ Culbard, and I wasn't disappointed. The artwork is of the same standard of the previous graphic novels I've read by INJ Culbard; HP Lovecraft's At The Mountains Of Madness and The Case Of Charles Dexter Ward as well as Conan Doyle's The Hound Of The Baskervilles, so I knew what to expect. By the way, I would recommend those books as well. I thought the artwork fit the story well. The story, adapted by Ian Edginton, unlike the recent John Carter film, sticks very faithfully to the original book. It did feel like it was edited down a bit though, kind of like a two hour movie condensed into a half hour edit, as I breezed through the pages, but it never detracted from the story and was still an enjoyable read. If you loved John Carter the movie, then I would recommend picking this up to experience a pretty good adaptation of the original story, equally, I would recommend it to those who have read and enjoyed the original A Princess Of Mars novel too for exactly the same reason.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Kevin Dumcum

    Fairly faithful to Burroughs’ novel, and therein lies its faults. To be truly faithful, it would need to be three times as long. Truncated as it is, if I had not read Burroughs, I feel I would have been confused by what wasn’t included in this graphic novel retelling.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Laura

    enjoyed this sci fi story

  4. 5 out of 5

    Sherri

    Hard science fiction is a stretch for me, but this is a classic tale.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Johanna

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. I picked this up on a whim and read it in a couple of hours. Having not read the original 1917 novel, "A Princess of Mars," nor having seen the 2012 movie "John Carter," I can only comment on the graphic novel adaptation. Structurally, as graphic novels go, it's decent. The art is well drawn, and they make good use of the graphic novel as a visual storytelling device. The panels are laid out interestingly and convey the story clearly, with only a few segments where it was a little hard to follow. I picked this up on a whim and read it in a couple of hours. Having not read the original 1917 novel, "A Princess of Mars," nor having seen the 2012 movie "John Carter," I can only comment on the graphic novel adaptation. Structurally, as graphic novels go, it's decent. The art is well drawn, and they make good use of the graphic novel as a visual storytelling device. The panels are laid out interestingly and convey the story clearly, with only a few segments where it was a little hard to follow. HOWEVER, my feelings about the story of John Carter on Mars are a bit more complicated. Let's go back to the whim that caused me to pick this up in the first place. My professional background in the history of the American West, including a particular fascination with Western pop culture, coupled with a lifetime love of science fiction and fantasy, makes me a sucker for anything that combines the two. That said, "A Princess of Mars" is yet another example of the "going Native" cliche, think "Dances With Wolves," or "Avatar." Guy - and it is always a guy - from (what we the reader see as) the dominant culture (read: white) is taken in/captured by noble, stoic Native people; he learns their ways; he starts to see himself as one of them; he falls in love with a Native girl (only not too Native, because GOD FORBID he love someone too different from himself*). Then the Native people are threatened by bad guys, usually the same "civilized" culture our hero comes from or shares the most in common with at the start, and in the end our hero saves the day. The message is that it takes a WHITE GUY to swoop in and save the poor helpless Natives. Which is bullshit. Where are the indigenous heroes?! Who says the Barsoomians can't take care of themselves? I mean, even Tars Tarkas, one of the closest characters we get to a Barsoomian hero, says at the end, "Jeddak of Helium, it has taken a man from another world to teach the green warriors of Barsoom the meaning of friendship. To him we owe our understanding of the full meaning of your words and our ability to appreciate and reciprocate the sentiments so graciously expressed there." I am still waiting for the novel (particularly the sci-fi/fantasy novel) that's looking into these insider/outsider dynamics but doesn't fall flailing into what is, essentially, a racist cliche. All of that said, the academic in me thinks this book would make an excellent teaching tool. There's another graphic novel I read in college, "Comanche Moon," that I think would make for an interesting pairing with "A Princess of Mars," in courses about Native peoples and pop culture. Hence it getting two stars instead of one. *This is the one place where you will see me give "Avatar" some credit, at least Neytiri is full on Na'vi. But look at the others: in DWW we've got Stands With A Fist - white girl kidnapped, adopted, and raised by the Lakota; Dejah Thoris - still a Martian, but one of the Martians who is conveniently humanoid, oh, and from the slightly more "civilized" culture.

  6. 5 out of 5

    StrictlySequential

    It's as if Edginton was trying to make it confusing! I LOVE HIS WORK WITH CULBARD but this was the dud writing-wise. Culbard's art is just as good as their other collaborations I have relished: -The Picture of Dorian Gray -A Study in Scarlet -The Sign of Four -The Hound of the Baskervilles* -I have yet to find "The Valley of Fear" at my price point but being their fourth Sherlock Holmes adaptation should ensure excellence! *=was their first Holmes collaboration but I recommend reading them in the orde It's as if Edginton was trying to make it confusing! I LOVE HIS WORK WITH CULBARD but this was the dud writing-wise. Culbard's art is just as good as their other collaborations I have relished: -The Picture of Dorian Gray -A Study in Scarlet -The Sign of Four -The Hound of the Baskervilles* -I have yet to find "The Valley of Fear" at my price point but being their fourth Sherlock Holmes adaptation should ensure excellence! *=was their first Holmes collaboration but I recommend reading them in the order Doyle wrote them as shown above.

  7. 5 out of 5

    An Odd1

    In framing story, author reads uncle John Carter's journal, but "sealed and unread" for 21 years. Huh? Clearer without film's odd shapeshifter manipulators. John stares at red planet, without explanation wakes naked, hairless like androgynous plastic baby doll. Green alien Tharks look same as film, but devoted pet Woola is larger, 6' jaws. Soon John has trim dark beard and floor-length loin cloth - not easy for double-page fight scenes. Princess Dejah Thoris of Helium is a naked Barbie, later do In framing story, author reads uncle John Carter's journal, but "sealed and unread" for 21 years. Huh? Clearer without film's odd shapeshifter manipulators. John stares at red planet, without explanation wakes naked, hairless like androgynous plastic baby doll. Green alien Tharks look same as film, but devoted pet Woola is larger, 6' jaws. Soon John has trim dark beard and floor-length loin cloth - not easy for double-page fight scenes. Princess Dejah Thoris of Helium is a naked Barbie, later dons blue discs, not strategically placed, when he shaves head, paints body red, and wears helmet and cloak of warrior. Why does he return to Earth when he envisions five symbols that before safely opened door to energy plant? Are they all naked in original? Feels choppy, too like film - quotes, omissions, contradictions. For example, in film Thark commands John to jump, but he doesn't understand. Here no translation, just anger, fight. Flat faces, perhaps supposed to make red Indian hawk-nose profiles on him and her. Prefer ker-blam gun shoot-outs, sword-slicing, more 3D scenes. Ten years later, he "can see across the awful abyss, a beautiful black-haired woman, a little boy by her side, and at their feet a huge hideous creature with a heart of gold" p 131.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Rachel

    Adaptation is fairly faithful, although fans of the novel will note item left out. Panels & illustrations are gorgeous & the pages flew by..great to view others' vision of this story that I've read so many times growing up. Adaptation is fairly faithful, although fans of the novel will note item left out. Panels & illustrations are gorgeous & the pages flew by..great to view others' vision of this story that I've read so many times growing up.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Mark Smiley

    While preserving some of the original Egar Rice Burroughs flavor, this was an okay adaption into graphic novel form. Did not capture the e cite meant I had when reading these as a teen but still a good covering of the story and maybe truer than my imagination provided.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Zach

    This book was a true graphic novel, I showed the words, and had very descriptive pictures to go along with the words. I enjoyed the read because of the fantasy side of the story

  11. 5 out of 5

    Carolyn Klassen

    I give this three stars for the art, and no stars for the story. It just felt so uninteresting and only the beautiful setting kept me reading.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Todd Stanfield

  13. 5 out of 5

    Andy

  14. 5 out of 5

    Bill

  15. 5 out of 5

    el tyrant

  16. 4 out of 5

    Dan Lockwood

  17. 5 out of 5

    Richard Downey

  18. 4 out of 5

    Nick Jones

  19. 5 out of 5

    Josh Kushins

  20. 4 out of 5

    Dave

  21. 4 out of 5

    Ross

  22. 5 out of 5

    Gerard J. Medvec

  23. 4 out of 5

    Luciano

  24. 5 out of 5

    Kate

  25. 4 out of 5

    Rhys

  26. 5 out of 5

    Casey Taylor

  27. 4 out of 5

    John Dupuis

  28. 5 out of 5

    Nefertiti

  29. 5 out of 5

    Lauren

  30. 5 out of 5

    Deus

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.