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Style, Sex, & Substance: 10 Catholic Women Consider the Things That Really Matter

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Who is to say who the authentic Catholic woman is? And how do the perils and pitfalls of modern society impact that vision? Here is a fresh look at life from the perspective of ten Catholic women who live in the spotlight of the Internet -- ten bloggers who keep it real every day with their personal posts relating their triumphs, trials, and temptations for all to see. In th Who is to say who the authentic Catholic woman is? And how do the perils and pitfalls of modern society impact that vision? Here is a fresh look at life from the perspective of ten Catholic women who live in the spotlight of the Internet -- ten bloggers who keep it real every day with their personal posts relating their triumphs, trials, and temptations for all to see. In the same way, nothing is off limits in Style, Sex, & Substance. Each of these women brings a refreshingly open and humorous perspective to growing in faith and improving their relationship with Christ. Enjoy real stories, real struggles, and best of all, real faith and trust that God will bring out the best in all circumstances -- whether in the family room, the bedroom, or at work. Contributors include: --Hallie Lord --Jennifer Fulwiler --Danielle Bean --Rachel Balducci --Simcha Fisher --Anna Mitchell --Barbra Nicolosi --Rebecca Teti --Elizabeth Duffy --Karen Edmisten


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Who is to say who the authentic Catholic woman is? And how do the perils and pitfalls of modern society impact that vision? Here is a fresh look at life from the perspective of ten Catholic women who live in the spotlight of the Internet -- ten bloggers who keep it real every day with their personal posts relating their triumphs, trials, and temptations for all to see. In th Who is to say who the authentic Catholic woman is? And how do the perils and pitfalls of modern society impact that vision? Here is a fresh look at life from the perspective of ten Catholic women who live in the spotlight of the Internet -- ten bloggers who keep it real every day with their personal posts relating their triumphs, trials, and temptations for all to see. In the same way, nothing is off limits in Style, Sex, & Substance. Each of these women brings a refreshingly open and humorous perspective to growing in faith and improving their relationship with Christ. Enjoy real stories, real struggles, and best of all, real faith and trust that God will bring out the best in all circumstances -- whether in the family room, the bedroom, or at work. Contributors include: --Hallie Lord --Jennifer Fulwiler --Danielle Bean --Rachel Balducci --Simcha Fisher --Anna Mitchell --Barbra Nicolosi --Rebecca Teti --Elizabeth Duffy --Karen Edmisten

30 review for Style, Sex, & Substance: 10 Catholic Women Consider the Things That Really Matter

  1. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

    My interest in Hallie Lord‘s new book, Style, Sex, and Substance: 10 Catholic Women Consider the Things that Really Matter, was pretty high BEFORE the trailer was banned from YouTube. For one thing, I’m a fan of each of the contributors. For another, what’s not to love about a book that covers style, sex, and things of substance from a Catholic woman’s perspective? I had heard that it was a quick read, and I did, in fact, zip through it like my eyes were on fire. But here’s the thing: it was not jus My interest in Hallie Lord‘s new book, Style, Sex, and Substance: 10 Catholic Women Consider the Things that Really Matter, was pretty high BEFORE the trailer was banned from YouTube. For one thing, I’m a fan of each of the contributors. For another, what’s not to love about a book that covers style, sex, and things of substance from a Catholic woman’s perspective? I had heard that it was a quick read, and I did, in fact, zip through it like my eyes were on fire. But here’s the thing: it was not just good enough to keep me reading quickly; it was good enough to make me want to reread it and to make me write my name in the front. Each of the contributors brings a unique voice to the table, but they’re all united in what’s important: their deep faith and their enthusiasm for putting said faith in practice. Someone had mentioned to me that the book only got better as you read through, and much to my surprise (I love those early chapter contributors!), I found that to be true. I think the reason the book gets better is because, as you read through it, you go deeper and, while you’ll still find yourself laughing, you’ll also find yourself marking passages and dog-earring pages to reference later. Highly recommended for everyone in your life.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Theresa Thomas

    Style, Sex and Substance. The title of the book caught my eye. Hey, I like all three of those things, I thought, and then, I am a Catholic woman. Should a Catholic woman even think that? Um. Yes. Yes, I think she should. And if you don’t believe me, look at the subtitle: 10 Catholic Women Consider the Things that Really Matter. These things matter. Whew. These things really matter. The hook for me in the title was style. ‘Style’ is class. One definition is “an elegant and fashionable way of living” Style, Sex and Substance. The title of the book caught my eye. Hey, I like all three of those things, I thought, and then, I am a Catholic woman. Should a Catholic woman even think that? Um. Yes. Yes, I think she should. And if you don’t believe me, look at the subtitle: 10 Catholic Women Consider the Things that Really Matter. These things matter. Whew. These things really matter. The hook for me in the title was style. ‘Style’ is class. One definition is “an elegant and fashionable way of living”. Style is the antithesis of the image of the denim jumper so readily assumed to be the standard uniform of conservative homeschool moms like me. Yes, style interests me. I’ve been fighting the frumpy stereotype of homeschool mom since I first ditched my sleek pointy business heels and slid into slippers, stayed home, and then later started teaching my nine children more than 20 years ago. (I have never worn denim jumpers, for the record, but it is the assumption that most conservative homeschooling moms do, at least where I live.) I certainly want to embrace style, and run far from the image of frumpy housewife stereotype, especially now that I am in middle age. Oops. Did I just admit that? Ok, so it’s true. When I saw Style, Sex and Substance, I was intrigued by the idea of style combined with me, and thus this book, supposing a stylish, sexy and substantial modern me had a distinct advantage over other books on my nightstand waiting to be reviewed. I admit that’s why I picked it first. The author/editor of Style, Sex and Substance, Hallie Lord, is a devoted Catholic wife and mother who strives, like a lot of us do, for holiness. Unlike most of us, however, she has a personal shopping business where she helps dress other women beautifully, modestly and within a budget. How cool is that? Her example demonstrates we can be moms, strive for holiness and have style. Yay! I started with the chapter entitled Style: Balance, Beauty and You. I was not disappointed. I read about stylish modesty (yes, this exists), the power of transformation, and wrestling with vanity, the latter of which admittedly can be a pitfall when paying attention to style. This chapter offered wisdom on the balance of paying enough attention and paying too much attention to self and wardrobe, and it included a few checkpoints for self-evaluation: “If you wake up in the morning and open your closet only to find that nothing fits but pajamas and sweatpants, that’s a problem… If you avoid intimacy with your husband because you feel unattractive, that’s a problem… If you are constantly tired because you never have time to exercise, rest or spend time alone, that too is a problem…” The best thing about offering these checkpoints is that Hallie simultaneously offers helpful suggestions for improvement. I’d have taken notes to pass along to my own girls if everything hadn’t already been laid out nicely in the pages of the book. To be honest, some of what Hallie writes I already knew deep in my heart. Some of this I had already tried to live. But reading the words presented in a fresh and contemporary way reminded me of how and why I should take care of myself, and how and why I should dress in a pretty and stylish way. It inspired me to press on amidst the daily temptation just to let style go. It was written so well and motivated so much. Thank you, Hallie! Encouraged, I dug into the other chapters, which I found to be equally inspiring and totally relevant to a modern Catholic woman and her busy life. The book is funny. “I can’t write the marriage chapter. I have no business writing the marriage chapter,” begins Danielle Bean on page 117, “My husband and I are just coming off a 24 hour stint of avoiding eye contact because… well, I kind of forget why…” Oh my goodness, this is why so many women love to read what Danielle writes- frankness and humor combined is a lovely thing. The book is brutally honest. “I’m in my late twenties now. I’ve been a bridesmaid eight times… every other woman contributing to this book is married. Am I jealous? Absolutely,” writes Anna Mitchell in chapter five, Single and Seeking God’s Plan. The reader will find the right perspective with Anna, as she offers advice on vocation, discernment, and dating. I suspect her vocation will be realized soon. The book is profound. “A receptive woman is the most powerful creature in the world,” writes Simcha Fischer in chapter nine on motherhood, “…without her “yes”, nothing more can happen.” Her intriguing statement is explained in full. Her chapter may change the way you think about being a wife, and will definitely put a zip in your motherhood step and make you feel validated even in changing “poopy” diapers. Simcha is a mother of nine, an in-the-trenches, general of an army of children. Her chapter will help you realize the power of your ‘yes’. March on, mamas, is the message. If she can do it, you can too! The book is fun and flirty, substantive and serious, even all in the same chapter. I’m talking now specifically about Elizabeth Duffy’s chapter about sex. I must admit I did not know that combining bible quotes and Church teaching with practical suggestions and funny anecdotes could mesh so well. Elizabeth’s chapter really makes a mama think, and yes, giggle. I think God approves. I have to admit I loved the chapter Plugging in and Embracing Discipleship in the Twenty First Century contributed by Barbara R. Nicolosi, which deals with storytelling, television, movies and media, for a selfish reason. One of my (yes, practicing Catholic) children works in the thick of Hollywood and I’m tired of explaining to people that his work is important. I hope that media matters. After reading Barbara’s chapter you will know that it does. Barbara’s writing proves that devoted Catholic women can be brilliant, and she explains perfectly how engaging the culture rather than running from it can make the world a better place for all of us. Even if you live on a tiny farm in rural Kansas and only watch the Food Channel or HGTV, you will find this chapter compelling and relevant. Style, Sex and Substance includes questions for reflection at the end of each chapter, which makes it just right for a Catholic woman’s reading group selection. I was going to offer my sample copy of the book for a giveaway on my blog but then I decided to be selfish. I have six daughters who will benefit from these wonderful entries in time. I’m keeping this one. You will certainly want to nab a copy of Style, Sex and Substance from your local bookstore or Amazon. I think you’ll find after reading it you will be pondering more, complaining less, resolving to embrace your femininity, understanding your Faith, perhaps even signing up for an exercise class for self improvement, cleaning your closet and flirting with your husband. These are all good, relevant and delightful things that a Catholic woman should address and can enjoy, because these things are important. These things matter. I’m grateful for the wonderfully talented sisters-in-Christ authors who share their insights in Style, Sex and Substance. I’m recommending you invest $14.95 in this gem of a book and begin integrating the thoughts, suggestions and ideas within its pages into your own joyful authentic Catholic life.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Donna

    Reading this book felt like sitting down with a good friend or big sister and enjoying a cup of coffee and good conversation. For many readers, some of the writers will be familiar as they share their wit and wisdom through their blogs. The writing is intelligent but never condescending. It is encouraging but never demeaning. Topics that are covered are near and dear to the authors' hearts and are expressed with seemingly genuine concern for the reader. Each chapter ends with a number of thought Reading this book felt like sitting down with a good friend or big sister and enjoying a cup of coffee and good conversation. For many readers, some of the writers will be familiar as they share their wit and wisdom through their blogs. The writing is intelligent but never condescending. It is encouraging but never demeaning. Topics that are covered are near and dear to the authors' hearts and are expressed with seemingly genuine concern for the reader. Each chapter ends with a number of thoughtful questions for the reader to ponder. This book would make an excellent resource for a book club or small discussion group.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Deanna

    Great essays, relevant and real.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Amy C.

    I came away from this book thinking about how hard it is to create a book like this. Multi-author books are almost bound to leave the reader less-than-satisfied, because it's hard to connect with so many different personalities in such a short space of time. That said, I think the editor gathered an interesting group of contributors. The book gave me the feeling I often have after a Ladies' Night Out with other Catholic moms: I felt refreshed and grateful for the time I'd spent here, though I di I came away from this book thinking about how hard it is to create a book like this. Multi-author books are almost bound to leave the reader less-than-satisfied, because it's hard to connect with so many different personalities in such a short space of time. That said, I think the editor gathered an interesting group of contributors. The book gave me the feeling I often have after a Ladies' Night Out with other Catholic moms: I felt refreshed and grateful for the time I'd spent here, though I didn't really feel in sync with every woman I met there. A few of them were just the person Jesus wanted me to meet at that moment; perhaps the others will become dear friends at a different time, or perhaps not at all. Though the book was broad in scope, and therefore didn't hang together as well as I expected, I still greatly appreciated the effort to bring these different perspectives together in one place.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Heather

    This collection of essays on Catholic womanhood made me laugh, think, and nod along. It's not chick-litty, which is high praise from me. Jennifer F's chapter on motherhood was genuinely funny and I could see myself in her shoes. Danielle Bean's was surprisingly timely too, on marriage and finding the grace to keep moving forward. I really enjoyed Barbara Nicolosi's on modern media. It was a much more realistic appraisal than Teresa Tomeo's NOISE, which I remember more as a screed with lots of ane This collection of essays on Catholic womanhood made me laugh, think, and nod along. It's not chick-litty, which is high praise from me. Jennifer F's chapter on motherhood was genuinely funny and I could see myself in her shoes. Danielle Bean's was surprisingly timely too, on marriage and finding the grace to keep moving forward. I really enjoyed Barbara Nicolosi's on modern media. It was a much more realistic appraisal than Teresa Tomeo's NOISE, which I remember more as a screed with lots of anecdotes and exclamation points. Ms. Nicolosi's referral to papal documents praising modern media like Facebook, Skype, email, blogs, and the like and how they can be used constructively was a breath of fresh air. High praise. Worth reading.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Joyce

    Wow. What a great book. It was quick to read since it is an anthology of ten chapters, each one focusing on an aspect of how (practically) to be a faithful Catholic woman in the 21st century. There was so much food for thought and most of the chapters were sprinkled with humour that made the read so enjoyable. I will be reading this one again to take notes, because it was that good and useful! "Be who God meant you to be and you will set the world on fire." -St. Catherine of Siena

  8. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

    Entertaining as well as thought provoking, this is an excellent starting place for Catholic women to get some guidance and support from their literary 'girlfriends'. I was especially fond of the marriage and motherhood chapters, the latter of which made me a bit misty in its beautifully written truth. Definitely worth reading.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Julie Ann Cook

    This collection of insightful essays was definitely worth the read. Each was relatable to me as a Catholic woman and acted as a springboard for reflection. Though some had some deep-reaching subject matter, all were written with levity that made them accessible... and something I was eager to share with several Catholic and Christian girlfriends. I highly recommend this book!

  10. 4 out of 5

    Betsy Dion

    This book has some great essays that will be helpful for any Catholic woman. The first one moved me to tears. If you read much of the female Catholic blogosphere you may already be familiar with some of these women. It is great to see how they live out their faith with authenticity and passion. Don't be put off by the title, the book has more depth than I thought the title implied.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Jen

    Very good insights, and filled with humor. Not a book of sentimental stories - this is about real moms and single women dealing with the career world and today's society. My favorite tip(which may say something about me): Pray Like a Pirate - A-R-R-R ! (Acknowledge, Receive, Relate, Respond)

  12. 5 out of 5

    Lauren

    A bunch of funny, talented, and authentic Catholic women talking about life. A quick, enjoyable, and thought-provoking read! I did find it a tad unrelatable, since 9/10 of the writers are married with kids and I am a single, working young adult. But still good advice.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Davidnsharon Lunt

    So many different women; so many different stories! But in all of them is the echo of my own life and experiences. I am sure that is why I couldn't put this book down and why I go back and re-read it often.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

    A good read for Catholic/Christian mothers amidst the craziness of motherhood!

  15. 5 out of 5

    Lara

    A wonderful, challenging and witty read. Highly recommended!

  16. 5 out of 5

    Catherine

    A fun, inspiring read by great Catholic bloggers--the essays by Danielle Bean and Simcha Fisher were my favorite.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Lesley

    I don't buy books very often, so when I do - it means something big. I bought this book and plan to keep it and re-read it often. :-)

  18. 5 out of 5

    Clár

    Some of my favourite bloggers in book form talking about all things Catholic - woman style!

  19. 5 out of 5

    Monica

    Great short stories for daily reading! Put a fun, realistic spin on the life of a Christian woman. Made me feel like I'm not so crazy for some of the things I think!

  20. 5 out of 5

    Colleen Rein

    This was a good read, but it is more like a collection of blog entries than a book.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Megan

    Short little essays perfect for reading while the kids are busy at practice/lessons.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Elizabeth

    I devoured every well written essay and will be passing this around to my catholic friends.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Lisa

    Very good. Women's book study. Funny, relate-able and offers guidance.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Veronica

    Yes! So much here in this book. These women feel like my new old friends and I’m grateful for their insight into my life. The challenge posed by “my friend” in the last chapter is particularly good/hard for me.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Colleen

    I loved this book! I felt God had given me this book to read at this stage in my life for I now have the capacity to understand the points the authors were making that I need to hear. I will also apologize in advance for a long review, but I will give an upshot of this book. Upshot: While I think all Catholic women should read this book, I also think non-Catholic women could also get something out of it. Yes, this book is very much from a Catholic worldview, but if a non-Catholic woman is strugg I loved this book! I felt God had given me this book to read at this stage in my life for I now have the capacity to understand the points the authors were making that I need to hear. I will also apologize in advance for a long review, but I will give an upshot of this book. Upshot: While I think all Catholic women should read this book, I also think non-Catholic women could also get something out of it. Yes, this book is very much from a Catholic worldview, but if a non-Catholic woman is struggling on how to be a woman and a mother and they tried everything else then I would suggest that they should try this book. Long Review: This review will go through each of the ten chapters and will use the some of the reflection questions as necessary. Chapter 1-How I Fell Out of My Minivan and Found Myself by Jennifer Fulwiler: In this chapter, Jennifer Fulwiler is going over how each woman is different and how their brand of holiness is going to be different. I felt that this was powerful, because it is easy to look at other Catholic women and think "Oh, I am doing it wrong." I know I have felt this way, because sometimes I feel I am too secular for the religious crowd and the secular crowd sees me as religious. Yet, what I think some of us forget is God made each of us unique. The trick is separating out our quirks from our sins or as the author put it "where they collide." I think for me pride and anxiousness is mixed up in some of my quirks, but I am still discerning that part. I also think that I am too emotional, but that emotion could mean that I am better at empathy and I could help people that way. Chapter 2-Style-Balance, Beauty, and You by Hallie Lord: I thought this chapter was good and I really liked the reflection questions. I would like to think I am comfortable with embracing my individuality, but I think sometimes I have a hard time translating that individuality to my work clothes. I am not sure if I struggle with modesty. I like to think I do not, which is why when it was implied that I was not I became emotional. When I wear clothes I try to make sure everything is covered, but I also want to reflect me. I think physical appearance could contribute to evangelization, because it shows that everyone can wear different clothes from each other and still be Catholic. If feeling like I do not have time to do as much as I want to nurture myself is feeling guilty then I guess I feel guilty. As a whole, I feel I can take time, but finding that time can be a challenge. I have to do more discerning about whether my life is out-of-balance. I think I could easily become a workaholic, which is why I need to be vigilant. Chapter 3-God and Godiva by Karen Edmisten: This chapter made me think about what I could do more for my prayer life. Obviously, the one thing in my life should be following and serving God, because that is everyone who believes is trying to do. I would like to think I am doing this I know that I need to do more prayers to make sure I keep doing this. I think I struggle on some level that I can do it by myself, but that is erroneous and I need to rely on God. Chapter 4-Sex, Passion, and Purity by Elizabeth Duffy: For me, this chapter is more thoughts and principles to add to my toolbox, but I am not there yet (if I will every be) to actively use all of this chapter. Chasity is always good and learning more about marriage was also good. This chapter was very educational, because this subject is not always discussed among Catholics and so it is hard to not what is appropriate or not. This chapter more than most made me think that secular society does not truly know what the Church teaches and I think they would be surprise. Chapter 5-Single and Seeking God's Plan by Anna Mitchell: This is me in a nutshell! I really needed this chapter, because I am not sure if God is calling me to the vocation of marriage, religious life (a sister or nun in my case), or the single life. I also liked the St. Alphonsus Liguori's checklist. I think this is very useful. Chapter 6-What Works for You? by Rebecca Ryskind Teti: Yes! This chapter was so good, because it reinforce what I believe about what the Church says about women. What the Church says is different from what I hear other people say the Church believes. I also have an answer to the last reflection question and hopefully it is not heretical. Obviously, all of our content comes from God, which means as Christian women we are not here to create original content. Yet, if we understand Jesus's teachings and about the tools in our modern world then we can create original vehicles to carry that content. Unless you are a farmer, a gardener, a botanist, or someone else who works with plants, you may not get the agriculture base parables, but if you understand those parables that you may be able to use modern concepts to help with the understanding. Chapter 7-Fruitful Friendship by Rachel Balducci: This chapter made me think about my own friendships. I have acquaintances that are Catholic, but my friends are not. I once had a conversation about this very subject with my Dad and he said maybe by being friends with your friends it is way to show what being religious means and try to get them closer to Christ. I do know I need to speak up more when my friends are posting things related to religion that I know is not exactly right. I have done this, but I need to find better ways of doing it. Chapter 8-We Said Yes by Danielle Bean: I cannot do these reflection questions, because I am not married. Yet, this chapter was still relevant for me, because I look out into the world and I am like "I am not sure your view of marriage is correct." Then I read this and I am like "Yes, this." I realized somewhat early on that marriage as God intended is a beautiful thing, but like all good things it is not always a walk in the park and this chapter reinforce that. There just so much good stuff in this chapter, especially the part on communication. I was like "Yep, so true." Chapter 9-Receiving, Creating, and Letting Go: Motherhood in Body and Soul by Simcha Fisher: This is a chapter that I think all women should read, because it presents a different way of thinking about motherhood. Yes, this is not easy chapter to swallow, depending on how set you are in your ways and where you stand in your belief on God, but when I read it I felt like a million lightbulbs were turning on. The basic point of this chapter is all women are called to motherhood, where motherhood is defined as being receptive, being creative, and letting go when it is time. For women, that are called to physical motherhood (having children) this is really easy to see, but other women still participate in spiritual motherhood. This concept is easy to see when you look at pages 143-144. I think this chapter was great! Chapter 10-Plugging In and Embracing Discipleship in the Twenty-First Century by Barbara R. Nicolosi: I know I keep saying this, but this was also a great chapter. Living in the twenty-first century and being Catholic, can be hard for the media does not jibe with what we believe. For Catholics who do not want to sort through the media, it can be easy to say ignore it all, but as a librarian who knows research you can find gems among the trash. I am not sure if this is what the author meant, but I can find messages or ideas that remind me of God and Jesus's teachings in media that is not design to be religious. Every time I watch the end of Rise of the Guardians, I think about God and vocations. The Moon told Jack he was this and Jack refuse to believe. He gets into trouble then he believes and he is able to save the day. This plot is similar to what happens to us if we do not follow God. Another example of this is the music to The Greatest Showman. If you are just listening to the songs and you know your religion then I think you can find a religious message in the songs. The first time I realize this was when I was listening to From Now On. This song is what happens to us when realize we have not been following God, but chasing the material goods and wealth. While we can use other media to find our messages, I also agree with the author that we should put our own stories out there. I cannot tell you how frustrated I get to find Catholic fiction. I can find Catholic nonfiction all the time, but it is a struggle to find fiction on stories reflecting Catholic values. Verdict: This was a very good book!

  26. 5 out of 5

    Angela

    I am reading these short essays written by Catholic women on real life issues. Great practical advice for spiritual Christian women, not necessarily for Catholics only, although some references may not be understood by other denominations. A little MORE religious than I had anticipated. Seriously...how many of us have spiritual directors? Only my sister who is a consecrated virgin has a spiritual director. The rest of us are lucky if we make it to Mass on time. Overall, if you're looking for direc I am reading these short essays written by Catholic women on real life issues. Great practical advice for spiritual Christian women, not necessarily for Catholics only, although some references may not be understood by other denominations. A little MORE religious than I had anticipated. Seriously...how many of us have spiritual directors? Only my sister who is a consecrated virgin has a spiritual director. The rest of us are lucky if we make it to Mass on time. Overall, if you're looking for direction, this is a good book. But if you're happy with your spiritual life, then read the Bible in your spare time.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Kathleen

    This isn't a terrible book, and it has pockets of inspiration. It does, however, read like a group of extended blog entries. And that makes sense, considering the authors are a group of Catholic bloggers. My favorite chapter is the one on female friendships, which manages to be more substantive than most of the others while still maintaining a breezy style. It is frustrating, as any one of these essays might be the type of things that would end up sent around the Internet. There's something abou This isn't a terrible book, and it has pockets of inspiration. It does, however, read like a group of extended blog entries. And that makes sense, considering the authors are a group of Catholic bloggers. My favorite chapter is the one on female friendships, which manages to be more substantive than most of the others while still maintaining a breezy style. It is frustrating, as any one of these essays might be the type of things that would end up sent around the Internet. There's something about the book format, however, that makes me crave something more substantial.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Virginia Bonnett

    I am so thankful I bought this book. Ten authors wrote ten chapters about being a Catholic woman. Topics included marriage, a sense of self, children, work, being single, embracing art and technology, and more. I really loved the chapters by Jennifer Fulwiler, Hallie Lord, Simcha Fisher, and Barbara Nicolisi. A fabulous read for a boost of faith.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Elizabeth

    Fresh perspectives and challenging questions at the end of each chapter really make it worth the read. The chapters by Jennifer Fulwiler, Danielle Bean and Simcha Fisher especially are standouts, in my opinion.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Karen

    It's not what you think, but it will make you think. Definitely a book to read with a group. Take a chapter or two and see what you are called to do with it. Inspiring, encouraging, convicting. It's all good.

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