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How to Get Out of Debt, Stay Out of Debt, and Live Prosperously: Based on the Proven Principles and Techniques of Debtors Anonymous

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Out of the red... Do this month's bills pile up before you're paid last month's? Do you regularly receive past-due notices? Do you get letters threatening legal action if immediate payment is not made? Do the total amounts on your revolving charge accounts keep steadily rising? Into the black... Whether you are currently in debt or fear you're falling into debt, you are not alon Out of the red... Do this month's bills pile up before you're paid last month's? Do you regularly receive past-due notices? Do you get letters threatening legal action if immediate payment is not made? Do the total amounts on your revolving charge accounts keep steadily rising? Into the black... Whether you are currently in debt or fear you're falling into debt, you are not alone.  Forty million Americans--from doctors to secretaries, from executives to the unemployed--face the same problem and live under the same daily stress. Based on the proven techniques of the national Debtors Anonymous program, here is the first complete, step-by-step guide to getting out of debt once and for all.  You'll learn: How to recognize the warning signs of serious debt. How to negotiate with angry creditors, collection agencies, and the IRS. How to design a realistic and painless pay-back schedule. How to identify your spending "blind spots." How to cope with the anxiety and daily pressures of owing money. Plus the three cardinal rules for staying out of debt forever and much more! This book is neither sponsored nor endorsed by Debtors Anonymous.  A recovered debtor, the author is intimately familiar with the Debtors Anonymous program.


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Out of the red... Do this month's bills pile up before you're paid last month's? Do you regularly receive past-due notices? Do you get letters threatening legal action if immediate payment is not made? Do the total amounts on your revolving charge accounts keep steadily rising? Into the black... Whether you are currently in debt or fear you're falling into debt, you are not alon Out of the red... Do this month's bills pile up before you're paid last month's? Do you regularly receive past-due notices? Do you get letters threatening legal action if immediate payment is not made? Do the total amounts on your revolving charge accounts keep steadily rising? Into the black... Whether you are currently in debt or fear you're falling into debt, you are not alone.  Forty million Americans--from doctors to secretaries, from executives to the unemployed--face the same problem and live under the same daily stress. Based on the proven techniques of the national Debtors Anonymous program, here is the first complete, step-by-step guide to getting out of debt once and for all.  You'll learn: How to recognize the warning signs of serious debt. How to negotiate with angry creditors, collection agencies, and the IRS. How to design a realistic and painless pay-back schedule. How to identify your spending "blind spots." How to cope with the anxiety and daily pressures of owing money. Plus the three cardinal rules for staying out of debt forever and much more! This book is neither sponsored nor endorsed by Debtors Anonymous.  A recovered debtor, the author is intimately familiar with the Debtors Anonymous program.

30 review for How to Get Out of Debt, Stay Out of Debt, and Live Prosperously: Based on the Proven Principles and Techniques of Debtors Anonymous

  1. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer

    How to Get Out of Debt, Stay Out of Debt, and Live Prosperously, by Jerrold Mundis It's a bad sign when I start reviewing book while I'm still reading it. If I'm taking the time to review, it means I'm not enjoying the reading, I'm not compelled to turn the pages, and I'm not finding the reason I'd hoped for--the why of my reading. With this book, I can sum my feelings up in one sentence: I hate books that take forever to get to the point. I will now elaborate: This author spends the first several How to Get Out of Debt, Stay Out of Debt, and Live Prosperously, by Jerrold Mundis It's a bad sign when I start reviewing book while I'm still reading it. If I'm taking the time to review, it means I'm not enjoying the reading, I'm not compelled to turn the pages, and I'm not finding the reason I'd hoped for--the why of my reading. With this book, I can sum my feelings up in one sentence: I hate books that take forever to get to the point. I will now elaborate: This author spends the first several chapters explaining what debt is, what types of debts there are, ways people go into debt, why it's bad, etc. For example, all of chapter 3 is devoted to telling people how to determine if they have a debt problem, like for those in denial. Hello? If we didn't have a problem with debt, then why would we be reading this book? Additionally, none of his examples or categories specifically fit my family's financial situation. Not very helpful. Not to knock this author down alone (a point he actually makes--we are not alone with our problems, such as debt--he is not alone in a horrible writing pattern), I have found the same problem with other financial success books. The same problem is also seen in health and weight loss books, and in marriage enhancement books. All these authors, editors, and publishers need to remember, the people wouldn't come to the books if they didn't know they already have a problem or an issue they want to work on. Save the finger wagging for an appendix, or for later chapters. Give a quick tiny summary of why other things don't work or why what we're already doing isn't working, then please, explain your program! If I have to read chapter after chapter until I find what your specific solution is, you will have lost me way before then. (In the last health book I read, the author picked apart diet after diet, chapter by chapter. After 50 pages of this, I skimmed and skipped to the last two chapters where he finally explained his method, his solution. Sigh. Will they ever learn?) So far, I'm about 15% of the way through this book. If I have to read much more without being engaged, I'll have to stop. Skimming chapters is a lot harder to do in an ebook than a paper book. I don't care if his program works. I don't care if I could learn from it. If the author doesn't tell me quickly, I have to stop. Who has time for this? The first solution to making debt disappear is to make or save money. Time is money. Time wasted on unnecessary reading in a book = time lost that could have been used to make money. Rant over. I am just frustrated with the book. I don't want to give up in case there's something I could learn, but so far, nothing. And the author seems to look down on people in debt, like they're irresponsible or something, including himself in the group, even though not all people with debt are like that. He thinks most of us are in denial. Um, nope. I know exactly my situation, how much we make, how much we own, how much is in our bank account, how much we need each month, the terms of our credit cards and loans, etc., etc., etc. So I find myself getting angry at being talked down to. I'm sure there are people out there who aren't like me, and are clueless about their actual financial situation, so maybe this book is geared more towards them. In one scenario, the author describes an "anorectic spender," one who lives so frugally that he never spends in anything nonessential, to the point that he deludes himself into thinking there is not enough money, therefore he borrows to get through (although he doesn't have to???). Um, confusing. Conflicting as well. At one point the author is telling you you shouldn't spend money you don't have on frivolous things like designer clothes, then the next he is telling you that not spending on such luxuries will send you into debt by creating a scarcity mentality. What??? The one thing I've agreed with that I've read so far is that you shouldn't play the victim and justify why you went into debt. (Don't focus the blame on circumstances. Accept responsibility and work to change. I haven't read far enough, but I hope these concepts are coming.) I have now slogged through 22%, and 4 chapters, reaching (finally!) part two. The author promises in his last sentence that "all you have to do is turn to the next chapter," to "reverse your situation and begin to liberate yourself from debt." It can't come soon enough. If only I could believe the solution will be in the next chapter. Liar. A few paragraphs into the fifth chapter, the author writes, "The techniques and strategies you'll use to free yourself from debt begin in chapter 6." (How much more of this can I take??? As a reader, I'm being strung along...) Okay, now, chapter 5 is time for an exercise in mindfulness, a visualization exercise. He wants you not to define yourself by your debt. Great. If you do define yourself by what you owe, this is definitely the book for you. Another way I'm not connecting. I do not define myself by my debts. Yes, I have them. Yes, I owe money. But I don't cripple myself under the weight of them. I still have to live my life, and meet the needs of my family and other obligations. I am not a number. Since this is a lesson I have already learned, I wish the author could add an aside: if your answer to this question is "do not apply," please turn to page... I made it through chapter five. On to chapter 6, I know I'm going to finally to learn some techniques. Right? He said so last chapter. He spends several pages reiterating how important it is not to be in debt denial. He's done this already for a fourth of his book. And then, redundantly again, step one: "freely admit it's there." Seriously? Step two: "reread chapters 1 through 5." (Thanks, but I'd rather bang my head against a wall.) And the author continues, ending with the last step of "proceed(ing) as if you didn't have any denial." (Again, denial would mean that I'm not even reading the book in the first place.) Later in the chapter he goes on to describe another step which is actually using a form of denial: "Give yourself 30 days worry-free from debt." You are supposed to gather up all the bills and notices and whatever and put them in the "friendliest container you can find," then put the container away and "forget about the bills and notices for the next thirty days... truly forget about them. They don't exist. They're not your problem." I'm sorry but this is just a form of DENIAL which is what he just told us NOT to do. You are lying to yourself if you try to believe that your bills are now not your problem, even if for a 30 day break. He wants you to "then go about your life and have a good time." He ends this chapter with a postscript that you can skip this step if you've never been late on a payment before. Once again, a disclaimer such as, "if your answer to this question is "do not apply," please turn to page...," would have been so nice to have here. Finally on the last page of chapter 6 (the promised technique!), "just for today, one day, do not incur any new debt." Um, okay. That's it? Chapter 7 begins with telling the reader that they are to live the "no debt for a day" principle one day at a time (along with another plea to go back and read chapters 4 and 5, yet again!--No. Just no.). There's even a mantra you are supposed to repeat 3 times, forcefully and with conviction. (Not happening.) Silence. Shocking. The big reveal leaves me speechless. I have no words. Actually, I do, but this review is long-winded enough that I'll just stop here. I've made it through 7+ chapters (33%). Although it looks like chapter 8 features how to use a spending record, and this chapter might actually get into a little more of the how-to (which is why we wanted to read the book in the first place, right?), I am not willing to waste more time on it. Save yourself the time and money from reading this book. Dave Ramsey with his "gazelle" intensity focus was much more succinct and to the point, even though he took a bit to get to the point in his book. Read online strategies from Ramsey or Ric Edelman, and save yourself a lot of pain from trying to get through this book.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Merrie Haskell

    I nabbed this book on sale because my brain interpreted the title as being on how to build savings as well. I was a little surprised that it was basically a Debtors Anonymous guide, but here's the thing : everything he says about debt can be applied to saving. This book is excellent for diagnosing your personal resistances, for roadmapping your financial goals, and for promoting a non-sexist, egalitarian way to balance finances with household labor (including emotional labor!). Blew my mind. I'm I nabbed this book on sale because my brain interpreted the title as being on how to build savings as well. I was a little surprised that it was basically a Debtors Anonymous guide, but here's the thing : everything he says about debt can be applied to saving. This book is excellent for diagnosing your personal resistances, for roadmapping your financial goals, and for promoting a non-sexist, egalitarian way to balance finances with household labor (including emotional labor!). Blew my mind. I'm glad I read it.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Tigerlil

    This was such a helpful book! It identified my financial issues based on bad habits and emotional elements. It inspired me to clean up my act and stop some really self-defeating financial habits (under-earning, vagueness about finances, etc) I highly recommend to anyone who has financial stress

  4. 5 out of 5

    Akilah

    I read this book because I'm working on getting out of debt (obviously) and the credit counseling agency suggested I speak to my creditors about lowering my monthly payments. I wasn't sure where to start and a friend suggested I read the chapter in this book about communicating with creditors. It was, indeed, helpful. Me being me, I of course went back and read the whole thing. I don't remember a whole lot about the book, honestly, because it took me months to finish. The main things I remember ( I read this book because I'm working on getting out of debt (obviously) and the credit counseling agency suggested I speak to my creditors about lowering my monthly payments. I wasn't sure where to start and a friend suggested I read the chapter in this book about communicating with creditors. It was, indeed, helpful. Me being me, I of course went back and read the whole thing. I don't remember a whole lot about the book, honestly, because it took me months to finish. The main things I remember (and like!) about the book are these: 1. This takes a much different approach than Dave Ramsey's The Total Money Makeover: A Proven Plan for Financial Fitness. Ramsey's approach is get more jobs and make more money to pay down the debt quickly. Mundis advises instead that you not work yourself to death to pay off your debt and instead make more space for yourself and the things you enjoy doing and work on paying off the debt slowly instead. It's a different approach to be sure and much gentler, but as a person who can't really work a second job in a way that wouldn't leave me completely depleted, Mundis's way is very appealing. 2. There's a great section on calculating household financial contributions that takes into account household labor, so anyone who is partnered and knows they're pulling their weight with labor if not with money, that may be useful. 3. Okay so this third thing was so huge that I actually marked the page because if nothing else, this is the main thing I need to remember from this book: Every action you take is a complete success, regardless of the results. As a perfectionist who constantly gets paralyzed when it's time to take action because I can't stop focusing on the possible outcomes, I need to tattoo this on the inside of my eyelids. I mean, honestly. That statement was preceded by this one, which is also important (and which I already know and have an easier time with even if that does mean I'm contradicting myself, but brains, man): Whatever the action is, it's the action that brings about a result, not a wish. I mean, yes, that makes sense to me, but you know, I want to control those results. So, the book was worth it to me for that one. Oh and here's another good gem: A final point about goals is they are not something you have to achieve. So there you go. All in all, this is a good addition to my debt reduction arsenal. It has good, practical advice and favors a gentle approach (which is hard for me!). Oh, since Debtors Anonymous is mentioned in the title, I should mention that he spends about a page and a half on that specifically when he encourages the reader to find a support group, though he acknowledges that it's not the only one or the only avenue for support. It's mentioned again at the very end under resources as well. The book didn't feel like an ad for it at all, which is what I thought it might be when I started reading. So if you were considering checking out the book but were put off by the fact that he may proselytize, he doesn't. Like most self-help books, though, he does have a section on God/the universe, etc, so there is also that. 3.5 stars, rounding up

  5. 4 out of 5

    Lynn

    Mundis is the master of writing self-help books. I like this one especially because A) this book helped many people I know get out of debt and buy a home, B) this book continues to prove a tried and true guide to prosperity, and C) his writing is highly motivational. The motivation comes from clarity: what he writes about is the common sense thinking and behavior that many people with money problems don't want to exercise. For example, "'You don't have to go one more dollar into debt.' 'Sure I d Mundis is the master of writing self-help books. I like this one especially because A) this book helped many people I know get out of debt and buy a home, B) this book continues to prove a tried and true guide to prosperity, and C) his writing is highly motivational. The motivation comes from clarity: what he writes about is the common sense thinking and behavior that many people with money problems don't want to exercise. For example, "'You don't have to go one more dollar into debt.' 'Sure I don't, and if I clap very hard and believe, Tinkerbell will live.' But it's true--thousands have stopped and liberated themselves completely . . . ." In another example, "You cannot get out of debt by borrowing more money . . . . Ed suggested I sit down with a pad of peper and write out all the ways I could think of to get the work done without debting. . . . So what finally happened? I had the urgent work--enough to satisfy function and aesthetics temporarily--done at the New York University Dental School, where the cost was about a third of what a private dentist would have charged, . . . . Ed said one other thing that afternoon, very casually. He said, "Miracles are commonplace in this program [Debtors Anonymous:]. All you have to do to begin your recovery and open the door to total freedom is avoid taking on any new debt today." Mundis is highly organized in his writing. The front of the book describes in detail the problem of debting and the second half explains in nuts and bolts how to change behavior. Subtitles throughout serve as clear guides to the topics covered. This is the first of two guide books to help folks with their money problems. Another Mundis book, Earn What You Deserve, helps folks stop debting AND improve income. I highly recommend this book for debtors as well as those who live with them.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Kathy McAnany

    Excellent! I read this book a long time ago and I am still following the principles outlined in the book to this day. The tools described in this book are invaluable. They have definitely helped me get on the right track with debt and money. This book offers some very profound truths. Truths that debtors either do not want to see or really don't see because they are in such a fog with their finances and overwhelmed with debt. I think the most valuable tool is the spending record. With the spendi Excellent! I read this book a long time ago and I am still following the principles outlined in the book to this day. The tools described in this book are invaluable. They have definitely helped me get on the right track with debt and money. This book offers some very profound truths. Truths that debtors either do not want to see or really don't see because they are in such a fog with their finances and overwhelmed with debt. I think the most valuable tool is the spending record. With the spending record you begin to see clearly where every dime is going. You will no longer wonder where all your money has gone. Because you will have the spending record that tells you exactly where your money was spent. Excellent guide and resource for those looking to get out of debt and recover financially.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Ken

    I am really inspired by this book, and am looking forward to putting its principles into action. Interestingly, it very much adheres to the SCRUM principles used in software engineering, predating that invention by 6 years or so. This is a very readable book, I like how each chapter is broken up into smaller digestible nuggets.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Lex

    I wanted to get advice on finance. This is first book that I read completely and want to return to again. I created an excel sheet of my own based on the book's layout and have been keeping track of my spending and planing to pay off debts. I wanted to get advice on finance. This is first book that I read completely and want to return to again. I created an excel sheet of my own based on the book's layout and have been keeping track of my spending and planing to pay off debts.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Leticia

    A little outdated, but had some good tips and information about why people go into debt and how to change those behaviors.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Chavonne

    I would give this a 4.5. I really enjoyed this book. I read this not because I'm a compulsive debtor (thank goodness), but because I'm always interested in learning about other 12-step fellowships and have been learning a lot about financial stability lately. I think this is well-written with a lot of quickly-implementable, useful tools. Already I have tried a few and feel worlds more serene. The only thing that takes away from me is the chapter about couples and families. Personally, I don't bel I would give this a 4.5. I really enjoyed this book. I read this not because I'm a compulsive debtor (thank goodness), but because I'm always interested in learning about other 12-step fellowships and have been learning a lot about financial stability lately. I think this is well-written with a lot of quickly-implementable, useful tools. Already I have tried a few and feel worlds more serene. The only thing that takes away from me is the chapter about couples and families. Personally, I don't believe in separate accounts and I most certainly took issue with the idea of expenses being handled proportionally and/or with household chores being given monetary value. It feels very uncomfortable for me.Also, the idea of using credit again once solvent/secure feels like testing fate too much. Nevertheless, I love the idea of stopping debting immediately, having a sound spending plan, knowing what you're spending at all times, creating goal plans, looking at credit ratings in a different light, and getting support. Debtors Anonymous is a fantastic place to get support and it's clear that this writer works a good program.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Novac

    Whether you have $100 or $100,000 in debt, this book has many effective strategies for getting out of debt and staying out. I've read a few books about debt, and this one really does stand out above the rest. The first section of the book helps you deal with various "broken" views regarding money and debt, helping you understand why you might feel the need to debt. The second section helps put everything into perspective and take some stress off the way you think about your financial status. The Whether you have $100 or $100,000 in debt, this book has many effective strategies for getting out of debt and staying out. I've read a few books about debt, and this one really does stand out above the rest. The first section of the book helps you deal with various "broken" views regarding money and debt, helping you understand why you might feel the need to debt. The second section helps put everything into perspective and take some stress off the way you think about your financial status. The third section gives you the tools you need to take control of your finances and truly understand what's going on with your money. The final section helps you with the final stages of getting free from debt and how to increase your prosperity. The central concept of this book is: "Just for today, one day, do not incur any new debt." More importantly, the book helps you keep to this rule each and every day. Most of the ideas are based on the Back in Black program used by Debtors Anonymous.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Amy

    Explains well the mindfulness necessary to stop overspending and start living within one's means, and does so in a down to earth manner. Even with updates since first edition in 1988, a near complete ignorance of electronic spending/billing evident. In trying to point out that it is possible to live without any credit cards, offers lengthy, impractical, outdated steps to do so, making it look so archaic and cumbersome as to be impractical. Underestimates the necessity of some use of credit cards Explains well the mindfulness necessary to stop overspending and start living within one's means, and does so in a down to earth manner. Even with updates since first edition in 1988, a near complete ignorance of electronic spending/billing evident. In trying to point out that it is possible to live without any credit cards, offers lengthy, impractical, outdated steps to do so, making it look so archaic and cumbersome as to be impractical. Underestimates the necessity of some use of credit cards in 2012. Overall, though, his mindfulness exercises and tips are the message many of us need to hear to correct overspending. His recommendation to log all spending and to commit to no debting one day at a time are valuable messages. An update for 2012, including the prevalence of electronic transactions would make this at least 4 stars. Still a worthwhile read.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Aaron

    Fantastic! Puts the lessons of DA into a simple formula for success. The author insists to put yourself and happiness first, and at the beginning, your creditors a distant second. This is repeated many times through the book, ad nauseam. Once you come up for air, put all the stared practices in place, described in a clear step-by-step fashion. Some of the examples are a bit trite, and lack true clarity. Also, the book is a bit dated, with outdated numbers, and unaware of new vehicles of credit. H Fantastic! Puts the lessons of DA into a simple formula for success. The author insists to put yourself and happiness first, and at the beginning, your creditors a distant second. This is repeated many times through the book, ad nauseam. Once you come up for air, put all the stared practices in place, described in a clear step-by-step fashion. Some of the examples are a bit trite, and lack true clarity. Also, the book is a bit dated, with outdated numbers, and unaware of new vehicles of credit. However, the message is clear. Unsecured debt will only lead to further debt, stress and an unhappy life. I would recommend this book for the debt aware, curious or those living with a debtor. There is a small portion for those whom live a liquid life, but seem to under earn.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Valerie

    I really love reading finance books and have read my fair share. I found a recommendation for this book on line. It discusses the techniques used by Debtors Anonymous. The book was written 30 years ago and talks about a new thing called debit cards :). Most of the things were similar to what I had read in other books. The one thing that I really liked was the idea of spending your money on things that really give you joy and reducing cost on things that are not as important. So if you really lov I really love reading finance books and have read my fair share. I found a recommendation for this book on line. It discusses the techniques used by Debtors Anonymous. The book was written 30 years ago and talks about a new thing called debit cards :). Most of the things were similar to what I had read in other books. The one thing that I really liked was the idea of spending your money on things that really give you joy and reducing cost on things that are not as important. So if you really love going to the movies then go to the movies and drive an older car so you can afford it. There were several other things that were great. If you struggle with managing you finances or have had debt at one time or love reading about personal finance, I would recommend this book.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Lekeshua

    Jerrold Mundis did an excellent job of making the debt monster morph from horrible beast to a tiny speck of dust. Debting is a nasty addiction that many of us are suffering from. Debting isn't who we are and changing our mindset is very important. We allow debt to control our lives, for what? Is this what we expected the American Dream to be. I refuse this form of the American Dream. I want no part of it. Jerrold Mundis did an excellent job of making the debt monster morph from horrible beast to a tiny speck of dust. Debting is a nasty addiction that many of us are suffering from. Debting isn't who we are and changing our mindset is very important. We allow debt to control our lives, for what? Is this what we expected the American Dream to be. I refuse this form of the American Dream. I want no part of it.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Marla

    If you need help - this book will help big time! This book helped me at a time I needed to understand the cycle I was in and how to get out of it. It gave me the words I needed to write the letters I needed to write.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Amanda

    Was hoping to learning something new and interesting about money management because I think it is an important part of life. Unfortunately this book is more about the psychological aspects of debt and how to change your person not your money.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Linda Jenkinson

    This book showed me how to keep track of my money, helped me learn how to budget, and taught me how to deal with creditors. I have read it several times and recommended to many people who had questions on money management.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Katie Streeter

    Hoping to "work the program"... Hoping to "work the program"...

  20. 5 out of 5

    M

    Mandatory reading for every college freshman as they begin their adult financial life. Send it off to your college son or daughter tomorrow. I already did.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Becky

    Better than Dave Ramsey, but similar.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Wendy Ledger

    This is a wonderful book to rethink all your ideas about money. I would highly recommend it.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Shayne

    The book is a little out of date and for about a quarter of the book, I wasn't sure it would give me anything that I could really put to use. Once it got to the real principles of what you need to do to get out of debt and stay out of debt it was very helpful and filled with common sense. Know what you are spending, stop spending. What I truly loved is that it talked about changing your perception of money and earning and deserving it. That when we hold on tightly like Scrooge then prosperity do The book is a little out of date and for about a quarter of the book, I wasn't sure it would give me anything that I could really put to use. Once it got to the real principles of what you need to do to get out of debt and stay out of debt it was very helpful and filled with common sense. Know what you are spending, stop spending. What I truly loved is that it talked about changing your perception of money and earning and deserving it. That when we hold on tightly like Scrooge then prosperity does not flow in your life but when you are filled with gratitude and a feeling of prosperity then that prosperity is able to flow through you and better your life and those around you. You don't feel the need for things but for an experience of joy in life.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Michael Tildsley

    This book was serviceable enough. I feel like the author genuinely cares about the economic woes of his potential readers. He goes far enough in encouraging the audience and providing info on the basic steps. If anything, I feel like the author lets down in the “live abundantly” department. Other than writing about a few people he’s known who sort of fell into abundance after following the steps, the author doesn’t really go into the finer points of how to achieve abundance yourself.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Jovaughn Brown

    Motivational at best, outdated at its worse. There are some great mind hacks in here but many of them have been fleshed out in countless other self-help books. The techniques and anecdotes in this book don't fit the modern digital era, particularly with the fact that there are now so many smartphone apps that do a lot of the manual activities presented in this book. It also may be hard, as a millennial, to relate to the unnecessary amount of anecdotes, many of which felt like filler material. In Motivational at best, outdated at its worse. There are some great mind hacks in here but many of them have been fleshed out in countless other self-help books. The techniques and anecdotes in this book don't fit the modern digital era, particularly with the fact that there are now so many smartphone apps that do a lot of the manual activities presented in this book. It also may be hard, as a millennial, to relate to the unnecessary amount of anecdotes, many of which felt like filler material. In fact, most of the book seems to contain fluff meant to build suspense toward a life-changing debt technique. Overall the book reads too much like it's trying to sell the reader on something.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Sandra A

    Excellent This book covers all the touch stones to the problem of getting into debt and staying there. He offers practical, easy to understand techniques, exercises and philosophy of money to achieve control of your money habits. I h8ghly recommend this book.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Alcina

    This is an old book someone recommended. Unbelievably, it's helping me. I've read a lot of these, and it's taking hold and starting to work. I keep it by my bed or on my desk and intend to do that for the next 3 years - my goal for getting out of debt. This is an old book someone recommended. Unbelievably, it's helping me. I've read a lot of these, and it's taking hold and starting to work. I keep it by my bed or on my desk and intend to do that for the next 3 years - my goal for getting out of debt.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Sheila Friedman

    I am now retired and have realized that I need to look at my finances differently. This book gave me very clear advice on how to work with the money I have and not feel deprived in any way. I found it well written and informative.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Christy

    Much food for thought, and I loved that the author addresses the psychological reasons behind debt rather than the same old “drink coffee at home” tips of other financial advice books. I feel like I actually learned things about myself as well as practical tips for paying down debt.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Betty

    This book gave me practical suggestions on changing my thought processes so that I can succeed in getting and staying out of debt! Wish me luck!!!!

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