hits counter The Crucified Life: How To Live Out A Deeper Christian Experience - Ebook PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

The Crucified Life: How To Live Out A Deeper Christian Experience

Availability: Ready to download

"I am crucified with Christ: nevertheless I live; yet not I, but Christ liveth in me; and the life which now I live in the flesh I live by the faith of the Son of God, who loved me, and gave himself for me."   The apostle Paul declared in his letter to the Galatians that he had been “crucified with Christ.” But what does this mean? Is this a claim every believer can and shou "I am crucified with Christ: nevertheless I live; yet not I, but Christ liveth in me; and the life which now I live in the flesh I live by the faith of the Son of God, who loved me, and gave himself for me."   The apostle Paul declared in his letter to the Galatians that he had been “crucified with Christ.” But what does this mean? Is this a claim every believer can and should make? The Crucified Life is a comprehensive exploration of these questions, answered with the deep, biblical thinking for which Tozer was revered. “God is ingenious in developing crosses for His followers,” Tozer was fond of saying. At the heart of the book is a call to believers to follow Christ to the Cross and be raised to new life—a call to live and thrive in the crucified life.


Compare

"I am crucified with Christ: nevertheless I live; yet not I, but Christ liveth in me; and the life which now I live in the flesh I live by the faith of the Son of God, who loved me, and gave himself for me."   The apostle Paul declared in his letter to the Galatians that he had been “crucified with Christ.” But what does this mean? Is this a claim every believer can and shou "I am crucified with Christ: nevertheless I live; yet not I, but Christ liveth in me; and the life which now I live in the flesh I live by the faith of the Son of God, who loved me, and gave himself for me."   The apostle Paul declared in his letter to the Galatians that he had been “crucified with Christ.” But what does this mean? Is this a claim every believer can and should make? The Crucified Life is a comprehensive exploration of these questions, answered with the deep, biblical thinking for which Tozer was revered. “God is ingenious in developing crosses for His followers,” Tozer was fond of saying. At the heart of the book is a call to believers to follow Christ to the Cross and be raised to new life—a call to live and thrive in the crucified life.

30 review for The Crucified Life: How To Live Out A Deeper Christian Experience

  1. 4 out of 5

    Matt

    Tozer is a spiritual tonic.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Joshua Mckeown

    LOVE THIS BOOK. It's great and really speaks to us in how we are to live a life that is crucified with Christ. I want to make sure I'm a "hundred folder" LOVE THIS BOOK. It's great and really speaks to us in how we are to live a life that is crucified with Christ. I want to make sure I'm a "hundred folder"

  3. 4 out of 5

    June

    The Crucified Life is written in a simple way but yet has some profound truths in the latter portion of the book. There are a few terms like mystics that can be off-putting given the history of the term. He does define how he uses such terms. The highlight was the hymn at the end which summarizes the thought being expounded. Often I felt that without the hymn, the points were not often clearly articulated. Do not expect a how- to -list. A. W. Tower’s intent is that you understand what the crucif The Crucified Life is written in a simple way but yet has some profound truths in the latter portion of the book. There are a few terms like mystics that can be off-putting given the history of the term. He does define how he uses such terms. The highlight was the hymn at the end which summarizes the thought being expounded. Often I felt that without the hymn, the points were not often clearly articulated. Do not expect a how- to -list. A. W. Tower’s intent is that you understand what the crucified life is meant to be and then using the Bible and hearing the Holy Spirit to flesh out your personal journey. Near the end, there was quite a bit of repetition but with solid examples. This book is more suited to repeated readings to grasp certain content . But I do recommend reading slowly. It is a good companion to books such as The Cost of Discipleship by Dietrich Bonhoeffer, Radical by David Platt. The author recommends other classical Christian books for further reading. This works for a Christian at any stage of the journey. Personally I preferred The Cost of Discipleship to this.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Andrea

    I read about a third of this book but couldn't justify continuing. I knew that Tozer was with the mystic crowd and though I have enjoyed some of his other books (although I haven't read anything of his in years) this book doesn't get past the introduction without expressing its heavy reliance on the mystics of the past. Tozer, himself uses the term unapologetically to refer to people who "really knew God" through "an intimate, a direct, relationship" with Him. Tozer also makes a big deal about q I read about a third of this book but couldn't justify continuing. I knew that Tozer was with the mystic crowd and though I have enjoyed some of his other books (although I haven't read anything of his in years) this book doesn't get past the introduction without expressing its heavy reliance on the mystics of the past. Tozer, himself uses the term unapologetically to refer to people who "really knew God" through "an intimate, a direct, relationship" with Him. Tozer also makes a big deal about quoting from the King James version and writes that though he reads from many versions and doesn't think other versions are bad, the King James Version "has been so mightily used of God that it deserves a place of honor in our reading and study." The argument that so many people have benefited from it seemed pretty weak for devoting a whole section to the explanation for which version he is using. In light of the fact that this book is a compilation of Tozer's teaching over his lifetime, it's dubious that this stated preference has really anything to do with the material in the rest of the book. I can accept that the mystics and the King James Version have contributed positively to many's spiritual growth, and there were a few good nuggets in what I read, but I really disagreed with a lot of what Tozer wrote in this book and I also didn't think it was formatted very helpfully. Because it's a compilation it's really hard to tell how it was pieced together or whether or not any particular section was intended to be juxtaposed with what surrounds it. This fact, I'm sure, accounts for much of the awkward flow and casual style. The following were points of contention for me: 1. Tozer's definition of a Christian - "one who sustains a right relationship with Jesus Christ." I have a big problem with the word "sustains" in this definition and the idea that it is the believer who is the agent in sustaining the relationship. By grace we are saved and by grace God sustains us (not the other way around). Hebrews 10:14 "For by one sacrifice he has made perfect forever those who are being made holy." 2. The author writes that there are no "honest seekers looking for proof of Christianity" because Christianity is not on trial, Christ is. He writes that because Christ rose from the dead and because Scripture says Jesus was approved by God, there should be no question about whether or not Christ is who he he claimed to be. Tozer writes, "The worshipping heart knows He is what he claimed to be because God sent the Holy Spirit to carry the confirmation to the conscience of man." He seems to use circular reasoning for the "proof" of Christ. Of course, we know that Jesus says, "All those the Father gives me will come to me, and whoever comes to me I will never drive away." Arguing that the truth of Christ is obvious is not the point. A believer will think that it is, an unbeliever won't. 3. Tozer writes of the "ultimate Christian experience, being a hundredfold Christian," instead of merely being satisfied to be a "thirtyfold Christian" (from the parable of the sower), that we should press on to spiritual perfection and that the "path that accomplishes this is living the crucified life." He is no doubt influenced by Wesley's views on this matter and references him multiple times. I don't understand the Bible to teach the possibility of attaining Christian perfection in our earthly lives. 4. His philosophy about the Christian's journey is confusing and unbiblical. He writes of Christians that "many begin [the race], but few cross the finish line" and that "success in the Christian life is not automatic." I don't know how he reconciles that with Phil. 1:6 ("that he who began a good work in you will carry it on to completion until the day of Christ Jesus.") or Romans 8:30 ("And those he predestined, he also called; those he called, he also justified; those he justified, he also glorified."). Tozer writes, "It is possible to be a Christian and yet be a failure." He assures the reader that even the Lord's people who "live and die spiritual failures" will not be rejected by God in the end but writes that Christians should be concerned not only to save their souls but to save their lives here on this earth by living a "separated, clean, holy sacrificial life - a life of continual spiritual difference." 5. Tozer distinguishes between the natural man, carnal man and spiritual man. He claims that Israel represented Old Testament prototypes for each of these at different points in her history. The natural man does not know a thing about God or a thing about the spiritual life. The carnal man is the "immature Christian who does not go on or advance. He is slowed in His spiritual development and is not influenced or controlled by the Holy Spirit but rather by his lower nature." Um, what? There are too many verses to list that contradict the idea of a Christian who is not in some way advancing and actively influenced by the Holy Spirit. Finally, "of the three types, it is the spiritual man who is living the crucified life. He is indwelt, led, taught, influenced and controlled by the Holy Spirit." Confusingly, at a later point he writes that, the spiritual man may continue "wandering spiritually instead of moving straight ahead" and that he may swing back and forth "between the old world we came from and the new world where we ought to be." He notes that the best time to "plunge into the deeper spiritual life is when you are a young Christian and have enthusiasm and can form deep-seated habits." He likens this process to learning a new language and claims that the "older" you get in Christ the harder is is to learn to live deeper spiritually. Or something. This whole section was weird and contradictory. 6. There is a whole chapter on the loneliness of the crucified life. Tozer writes that people depend on each other too much and that "Christian fellowship is wonderful, but there comes a time when even that becomes a hinderance." I'm not even sure what he means when he writes, "You probably want to help others, so do it as far as you can, but God wants you to press through to where there is no natural light to help you. You cannot lean on anything natural when you're in God's presence." Apparently he considers other believers to be "natural." He writes, "There are some things in life that must be done by ourselves. Nobody can help us. Nobody can assist us along the way. That is why there is such a breakdown in evangelical circles today. We want to rely on each other." I find this way of thinking to be incredibly contrary to the New Testament teaching about the church, the Body of Christ (1 Cor. 12:21 "The eye cannot say to the hand, "I don't need you!" And the head cannot say to the feet, "I don't need you!"). Tozer goes on to say that "the better pastor you had, the more you would become a spiritual parasite and lean on him. Often the most spiritual people attend churches where the pastor cannot preach his way out of a wet paper bag. The reason is because they have no help from the pulpit, so they have to learn to lean on God. If you get too much help from the pulpit, you tend to become a parasite and lean on your pastor." This is just weird. He references Brother Lawrence (you can also read my negative review of his book The Practice of the Presence of God) so I got the impression that Tozer is compelled by the solitude of the monk lifestyle. I have a hard time justifying this lifestyle not only because of the Bible teaching about the church, but also because of the call for evangelism. Sure, you can go live by yourself and delude yourself into thinking you have this amazing communion with God, but are you doing what he actually says you should do? It's pretty easy to think you're a perfect Christian when you don't have to deal with all those annoying people all the time. Overall, I strongly disagree with the premise of this book - that some Christians (by what means I'm not entirely sure) can achieve "success" or a deeper spiritual life and ultimately spiritual perfection. I appreciate Tozer's passionate desire for God and convictions about growing in his devotion to Him, but I can't get behind his philosophy about how that happens and this book just felt like a bunch of loosely connected rants about the topic of Christian devotion. I'm not convinced that the format accurately portrays his views because it's impossible to tell how this "distillation" of a lifetime's worth of talks/messages was strung together. It kills me to give Tozer one star but I found so little helpful material and so much confusing and unbiblical material that I wouldn't recommend it to anyone.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Krista

    Wow I didn't realize how long it took me to read this. It is a wonderful book with a lot of deep things to think about. Tozer even addresses that devotional type books should not be rushed through. This book came at the right time in my life. It challenged me, spoke truth into my life, and made me examine myself. Wow I didn't realize how long it took me to read this. It is a wonderful book with a lot of deep things to think about. Tozer even addresses that devotional type books should not be rushed through. This book came at the right time in my life. It challenged me, spoke truth into my life, and made me examine myself.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Brenda

    Definitely need to get a hard copy of this one so that I can re-read it some time. This audio version included clips of Tozer, though, which was pretty neat. He sounded nothing like I expected him to sound.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Josue Manriquez

    Tozer has a lot of excellent things to say in this book. One of the strongest points of this book is Tozer's passion for God's glory being God's glory (as opposed to 99% belonging to Him, and 1% belonging to self). It is very easy to desire a little bit of that glory, but this is no good! His comments on living a life completely surrendered to God, no matter what the cost, are very convicting. I was also very much challenged by his prayer that God would orchestrate the events in his life that wo Tozer has a lot of excellent things to say in this book. One of the strongest points of this book is Tozer's passion for God's glory being God's glory (as opposed to 99% belonging to Him, and 1% belonging to self). It is very easy to desire a little bit of that glory, but this is no good! His comments on living a life completely surrendered to God, no matter what the cost, are very convicting. I was also very much challenged by his prayer that God would orchestrate the events in his life that would lead him to a point where God is completely exalted. There were, however, several parts of this book that I disagreed with a lot. A LOT!! It's hard to even give it 3 stars, but he had much more good things to say than the things I disagreed with. I'll have to write about them later, 'cause I left my book in my car. :-/

  8. 4 out of 5

    Joel Jackson

    This fantastic modern spiritual classic leaves me exploring my own approach to the life Christ has renewed in me through His gift of grace at the cross. I am left doing soul searching concerning issues of seeking personal praise and issues concerning what media I consume. There are many other points that Tozer makes that leave a person seeking out God's will for this life in expectation of the life to come. This fantastic modern spiritual classic leaves me exploring my own approach to the life Christ has renewed in me through His gift of grace at the cross. I am left doing soul searching concerning issues of seeking personal praise and issues concerning what media I consume. There are many other points that Tozer makes that leave a person seeking out God's will for this life in expectation of the life to come.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Stacy Wilson

    My rating is 4.5. I recently read The Pursuit of God and got more out of that then this one, but this is still an excellent and informative read. My favorite chapter was actually the last one, the conclusion, where he talks about obedience, surrender, and revelation. Things really clicked for me. Tozer is a must read for any Christian. Highly recommend!

  10. 4 out of 5

    Nderitu Pius

    This is a great book. I received amazing insight especially at a time when I was just tired of walking with CHRIST yet slipping into sin every time. I am still in that battle against sin so even as you read this pray for me not to say goodbye to this faith I love so much

  11. 4 out of 5

    Danette

    I listened to the audio which had clips of Tozer preaching at the end of each chapter. 2020 A book by A.W. Tozer

  12. 4 out of 5

    Wilson

    Listened as an Audiobook. I know many may discredit this due to mysticism, which is certainly found in this book. However, a sad mistake would be to shrug off the hard challenges because of the disagreements you find within this work. “If anyone would come after me, let him deny himself and take up his cross daily and follow me.” -Jesus (Luke 9:23)

  13. 5 out of 5

    Ruth

    It's been some time since I've read any Tozer, and I'm happy to have stumbled across this one. Although much of what Tozer says in this volume critiques a time and a church culture different from our own, there are still gems to be gleaned. I always appreciate Tozer's passion and sincerity, even when I don't always agree with his doctrine. It's been some time since I've read any Tozer, and I'm happy to have stumbled across this one. Although much of what Tozer says in this volume critiques a time and a church culture different from our own, there are still gems to be gleaned. I always appreciate Tozer's passion and sincerity, even when I don't always agree with his doctrine.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Jonathan Beigle

    Whew baby! This is the 4th Tozer book I've read, and I think this was my favorite. The primary focus of the book is to encourage Christians to be 100% sold out for Jesus. Even 1% of your life held back is not fully engaging in the Crucified Life. There are so many "mic drops" in this book. Tozer is constantly ridiculing the modern church and Christian for allowing secular influences to muddy the waters of the Christian life. Right off the bat in chapter one, Tozer calls out all the opportunities Whew baby! This is the 4th Tozer book I've read, and I think this was my favorite. The primary focus of the book is to encourage Christians to be 100% sold out for Jesus. Even 1% of your life held back is not fully engaging in the Crucified Life. There are so many "mic drops" in this book. Tozer is constantly ridiculing the modern church and Christian for allowing secular influences to muddy the waters of the Christian life. Right off the bat in chapter one, Tozer calls out all the opportunities have for Christians to be closer to God (advanced technology and easy-to-read Bible translations), yet Christian influence in our culture has never been weaker. I also kind of liked that he ended each chapter with an old hymn (most of which I've never heard of or haven't sung in church in 20+ years). If there is one thing I hesitated on is that sometimes I felt like he believes that we, as Christians, can't test the Scriptures with outside influences (like science). If we seek to confirm the Bible with science then we don't really believe. That might not have been his intention, but that is the feeling that I sometimes had. Favorite quotes (or in some cases, quotes to think about): p. 20 - "There is no greater offense in all of Christendom than speed-reading the Bible." p. 48 - "The efforts today to 'assist' Christianity with philosophy and science are going to get a cold frown from almighty God, and then He will let them go, little by little, their blind way into liberalism." p. 61 - "You can always test the quality of religious teaching by the enthusiastic reception it receives from unsaved men. If the natural man receives it enthusiastically, it is not of the spirit of God." p. 95 - "When the Early Christians were told that the love of the world and the things of the world meant they did not love God, they did not hold discussions on what 'the world' meant or how far they could go and still please God." p. 159 - "Discipleship [in the church] has given way to building self-esteem." p. 203 - "We do not have to understand what is happening in order to obey God. We do no need to know the outcome in order to obey God. As a matter of faith and trust, we obey God simply because He is God."

  15. 4 out of 5

    John

    This is really more like a 3.5 stars book - and here is why. Tozer is a great preacher and man of God no doubt. He writes challenging and with a voice of urgency and seriousness that will no doubt challenge you in your relationship to Christ. But he is also too black and white. It's all or nothing. It's 100% all the time. It's the ones that choose the crucified life and the others that choose the easy life. The problem is that normal life for most people is far from easy. Life is not black and w This is really more like a 3.5 stars book - and here is why. Tozer is a great preacher and man of God no doubt. He writes challenging and with a voice of urgency and seriousness that will no doubt challenge you in your relationship to Christ. But he is also too black and white. It's all or nothing. It's 100% all the time. It's the ones that choose the crucified life and the others that choose the easy life. The problem is that normal life for most people is far from easy. Life is not black and white. We come into situations all the time where it's difficult to do the right thing or know the right thing simply because there are no clear rules for it - not even in the bible. I've seen 100% for Christ people go wrong in life choices(maybe Tozer would tell us that he could not have been living the crucified life? But Tozer himself says he does not judge individuals. He does, however, time and time again judge groups of people who contain individuals - which I find sad because it's much easier). Tozer can then easily sound legalistic, raging against things like having fun or dancing, as if one has to choose those things away in order to choose Christ. No, a crucified life cannot be the life of a monk only, making our environment clean and tidy - there is no risk there. Life is not clean and tidy, and in this sense, Tozer feels detached from reality. There are many things here to like though because Tozer is engaging and gives a lot of insight into how to take your life as a Chrisitan more serious. I liked especially the chapter about reading more of the mystics. I even liked his choices of hymns after each chapter.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Nick Costa

    I was actually surprised by how much I didn’t enjoy this book, given that “The Pursuit of God” by the same author is one of my favourites that I re-read often. In my opinion, it dwells disproportionately on suffering as a prerequisite (and as a sort of “proof”) for salvation, and misses the crucial element of joy in a believer’s life. Perhaps I misunderstand where this book sits (and how it interacts) with wider Christian literature. I.e it reads to me as a sort of polemic against certain expres I was actually surprised by how much I didn’t enjoy this book, given that “The Pursuit of God” by the same author is one of my favourites that I re-read often. In my opinion, it dwells disproportionately on suffering as a prerequisite (and as a sort of “proof”) for salvation, and misses the crucial element of joy in a believer’s life. Perhaps I misunderstand where this book sits (and how it interacts) with wider Christian literature. I.e it reads to me as a sort of polemic against certain expressions of Christianity rather than making any positive declarations of its own. For example the author confuses his own taste in music as a sort of litmus test for acceptable worship, relegating all other styles to being some base form of entertainment and therefore abhorrent. This is too simplistic, and confuses the subjective with the objective. How are we to judge what can be classed as “worship” and what cannot? It is a matter of the heart, not the ears. The bible has more to say about the spirit in which we do it; not the style. This author seems to assert that there is only one acceptable way to do church—his way—and it must feature suffering—God forbid we be joyful! I never fail to marvel at the knack of some Christians to turn the gospel (literally “good news”) into bad news. Overall, I found the tone overly pejorative, the assertions depressing, and the witness unconvincing in exuding the sort of joy that following Christ (at least in my experience) entails.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Stan

    Five stars for the vital nature of this book, and, it IS Tozer! Tozer looks at what it means to live a life crucified. If you're in love with the things of this world rather than the things of God you probably won't like this book. However, you're probably the very person who needs to read it. One interesting thing is that Tozer talks about Evangelical Mystics. Very interesting concept. Curiosity piqued yet? He defines the term. Sadly, he doesn't provide a list. Several authors are mentioned favor Five stars for the vital nature of this book, and, it IS Tozer! Tozer looks at what it means to live a life crucified. If you're in love with the things of this world rather than the things of God you probably won't like this book. However, you're probably the very person who needs to read it. One interesting thing is that Tozer talks about Evangelical Mystics. Very interesting concept. Curiosity piqued yet? He defines the term. Sadly, he doesn't provide a list. Several authors are mentioned favorably throughout the book, so I'm guessing they fit the bill. Also interesting is Tozer's discussion of revival. He mentions three levels of revival. Perhaps "spheres" is the better term. Personal. Church. City/nation. And, he talks about what is historically present for these to happen. Great book! And, you really should read it. Oh, especially the chapter that talks about the refiner's fire. Living a crucified life is the human responsibility side of becoming like Christ. The refiner's fire is the God's responsibility side of one's becoming like Christ. Every important to know the difference! Grab this book. Read it in bite-sized chunks. It is Tozer, after all. He deserves a slow, contemplative reading. Enjoy it! Embrace it! Live it! You'll be glad you did!

  18. 5 out of 5

    Wes F

    I've always loved & appreciated A.W. Tozer's writings. He was a very thoughtful, powerful preacher/teacher in his day--and his insights & teachings based on the eternal Word of God still speak powerfully today. This was a cheap audiobook I got from chirp.com and listened to on my iPhone. It was refreshing & challenging--focused around Paul's seemingly paradoxical declaration in Galatians 2:20: "I have been crucified with Christ. It is no longer I who live, but Christ who lives in me. And the lif I've always loved & appreciated A.W. Tozer's writings. He was a very thoughtful, powerful preacher/teacher in his day--and his insights & teachings based on the eternal Word of God still speak powerfully today. This was a cheap audiobook I got from chirp.com and listened to on my iPhone. It was refreshing & challenging--focused around Paul's seemingly paradoxical declaration in Galatians 2:20: "I have been crucified with Christ. It is no longer I who live, but Christ who lives in me. And the life I now live in the flesh I live by faith in the Son of God, who loved me and gave himself for me." (ESV) Tozer presciently points out problems evangelicals of his day were experiencing with the weakening of their faith--and the compartmentalizing of their walk into the "sacred" & "secular." The descent into the belief that people of faith didn't need to take any risks or need to be inconvenienced in any way on account of their faith and choices. A "giving into" the pressures of the culture around them; a "conforming to," rather than a "transforming of" lifestyle. One of the things I loved about this audiobook was that at the end of each chapter, there was an audio selection from one of Tozer's actual sermons. Great to hear his voice of passion & clarity.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Matt Witten

    A challenging book worth the read. But, if you haven’t read “The Pursuit of God”, or “The Purpose of Man”, I would start there. I believe those are richer with direction and meaning, and carry less of Tozer’s personal weight. This is a great push on faith that produces works, and continuing to run the race of sanctification even after the moment of justification. With that said, I do think a lot of Tozer’s personal preferences (and even shortcomings) come through much more on this book, especially A challenging book worth the read. But, if you haven’t read “The Pursuit of God”, or “The Purpose of Man”, I would start there. I believe those are richer with direction and meaning, and carry less of Tozer’s personal weight. This is a great push on faith that produces works, and continuing to run the race of sanctification even after the moment of justification. With that said, I do think a lot of Tozer’s personal preferences (and even shortcomings) come through much more on this book, especially in earlier chapters - to the point of over exaggerating specific works in scripture/verses to justify a point (example, “thirty fold” vs “hundred fold” Christian). If you push back into the Scripture and can get through some of that, it’s still an enlightening and excellent read. But I’d start elsewhere with Tozer if you haven’t already.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Gideon

    I have always been an adept reader and lover of Tozer's works. He speaks truth from the inward parts and like a smith, he grew a skill in the rightly dividing of the word of truth. Yet, being gone for long though, his utterances are not ashamed because he spoke and do now yet speak by the spirit of God about the spiritual condition of man with regards to God, a truth that will never repent for as long as there is men on earth in a system patterned after the knowledge of good and evil. Another mou I have always been an adept reader and lover of Tozer's works. He speaks truth from the inward parts and like a smith, he grew a skill in the rightly dividing of the word of truth. Yet, being gone for long though, his utterances are not ashamed because he spoke and do now yet speak by the spirit of God about the spiritual condition of man with regards to God, a truth that will never repent for as long as there is men on earth in a system patterned after the knowledge of good and evil. Another mouth-watering and heart-throbbing voyage across the sea of Pa Tozer's knowledge by God's Spirit. His fount is blessed!

  21. 4 out of 5

    Gail Brown

    Read The Crucified life Every Christian should read The Crucified life. My thoughts are being directed toward living the crucified life. What better way to live, than the way out creator wants us to live. To live the Lord with all our hearts, all our souls and all our might. Then to live ot neighbor as ourselves. We can only do this by surrendering ourselves to the one who created us. Oh to live The Crucified life. What glory to God that will be. I'm unable to edit this for some reason, so forgiv Read The Crucified life Every Christian should read The Crucified life. My thoughts are being directed toward living the crucified life. What better way to live, than the way out creator wants us to live. To live the Lord with all our hearts, all our souls and all our might. Then to live ot neighbor as ourselves. We can only do this by surrendering ourselves to the one who created us. Oh to live The Crucified life. What glory to God that will be. I'm unable to edit this for some reason, so forgive me.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Matt

    This is my first go at Tozer and I wasn't all that impressed. While I appreciate his desire for believers to grow in holiness, he tends to downplay the role of the church and makes it a more personal pursuit. Trying to increase our sanctification in the church is difficult enough; trying to do in mostly on one's one is even harder. I would recommend The Pursuit of Holiness as a much better alternative. This is my first go at Tozer and I wasn't all that impressed. While I appreciate his desire for believers to grow in holiness, he tends to downplay the role of the church and makes it a more personal pursuit. Trying to increase our sanctification in the church is difficult enough; trying to do in mostly on one's one is even harder. I would recommend The Pursuit of Holiness as a much better alternative.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Gina

    I enjoyed reading this book. The premise is What does it mean to be “crucified with Christ”? In this book, I have definitely gained a fresh reminder of the cross’ centrality for my walk of faith in Jesus Christ. Tozer goes deep in helping us to understand Apostle Paul's letter to the Galatians & verse 2:20. I feel empowered by the words of encouragement and truth, reminded of what to do, how to act, how to adjust my attitude and truly let go and let God! I enjoyed reading this book. The premise is What does it mean to be “crucified with Christ”? In this book, I have definitely gained a fresh reminder of the cross’ centrality for my walk of faith in Jesus Christ. Tozer goes deep in helping us to understand Apostle Paul's letter to the Galatians & verse 2:20. I feel empowered by the words of encouragement and truth, reminded of what to do, how to act, how to adjust my attitude and truly let go and let God!

  24. 5 out of 5

    Tom Litzenberg

    In “The Crucified Life,” Tozer masterfully guides the reader to the truth that the abundant life offered through Christ is only found in the death of one’s Self. Contrary to being harsh and unloving, Tozer explains that this is actually an incredible gift of mercy and grace. If you struggle with sin in a certain area of your life, or just want to grow closer to God, I cannot recommend this book highly enough!

  25. 5 out of 5

    Reggie Byrum

    One of those Few Life-Changing Books There are certain books that change your life forever. This is one of those books. It will walk up, get in your face, stare at you and challenge you. It is a book that as soon as you finish, you start reading again because you know you could not have possibly grasped everything that was taught, it’s that much. Be prepared to be convicted, no matter where you find yourself in your walk with the Lord.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Thomas J Erdmann

    Living God's Way I am not qualified to critique such a sincere effort to explain how to live as Christ would desire us to live. Tolzer was a man of great faith and many highly educated people have rendered opinions which will be far richer than any I might attempt. I was challenged to grow in my faith and appreciated the numerous areas available to me. Tolzer explained what an intimate relationship with God is and how to achieve it. How to truly be a man of God! Living God's Way I am not qualified to critique such a sincere effort to explain how to live as Christ would desire us to live. Tolzer was a man of great faith and many highly educated people have rendered opinions which will be far richer than any I might attempt. I was challenged to grow in my faith and appreciated the numerous areas available to me. Tolzer explained what an intimate relationship with God is and how to achieve it. How to truly be a man of God!

  27. 5 out of 5

    Regina Beard

    After having read The Pursuit of God-- a book I still think about regularly, btw--I wanted to read more of Tozer. The Pursuit of God brought me to tears (even now), this book reads more like a how-to. Very workman-like, a bit repetitive and judgmental, even. But I continued to be awed by how apt is his description of the American Church today, even though he died in 1963...!

  28. 4 out of 5

    Christina

    So so good! This book really makes you pause and check yourself. The crucified like should be the life of every believer. This is full of deep rich truth. Because of that, I’ll read it again and slowly digest it all. But I could hardly put it down! Love this! Challenging, convicting, practical, and inspiring

  29. 5 out of 5

    Brian Black

    Not for the lighthearted. If you want to learn new things on EVERY page and be challenged in deep biblical ways, read this book! Great insight on labels, benefit of Hymnals in 2019, evangelism, the modern church, denominations, The Holy Spirit, spiritual guides, the purpose of the Bible, obedience and surrender. 100/10 recommend.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Nathan Foote

    Extremely challenging, but very much needed! The life of the Christian is never promise to be easy, or at least not in the pages of scripture. The world has built a Christianity that is false and promises wealth and happiness. Tozer demolishes those ideas by showing what true Christianity will cost you!

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...