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Abina and the Important Men is a compelling and powerfully illustrated "graphic history" based on an 1876 court transcript of a West African woman named Abina, who was wrongfully enslaved and took her case to court. The book is a microhistory that does much more than simply depict an event in the past; it uses the power of illustration to convey important themes in world h Abina and the Important Men is a compelling and powerfully illustrated "graphic history" based on an 1876 court transcript of a West African woman named Abina, who was wrongfully enslaved and took her case to court. The book is a microhistory that does much more than simply depict an event in the past; it uses the power of illustration to convey important themes in world history and to reveal the processes by which history is made. The story of Abina Mansah--a woman "without history" who was wrongfully enslaved, escaped to British-controlled territory, and then took her former master to court--takes place in the complex world of the Gold Coast at the onset of late nineteenth-century colonialism. Slavery becomes a contested ground, as cultural practices collide with an emerging wage economy and British officials turn a blind eye to the presence of underpaid domestic workers in the households of African merchants. The main scenes of the story take place in the courtroom, where Abina strives to convince a series of "important men"--a British judge, two Euro-African attorneys, a wealthy African country "gentleman," and a jury of local leaders--that her rights matter. "Am I free?" Abina inquires. Throughout both the court case and the flashbacks that dramatically depict her life in servitude, these men strive to "silence" Abina and to impose their own understandings and meanings upon her. The story seems to conclude with the short-term success of the "important men," as Abina loses her case. But it doesn't end there: Abina is eventually redeemed. Her testimony is uncovered in the dusty archives by Trevor Getz and, through Liz Clarke's illustrations, becomes a graphic history read by people around the world. In this way, the reader takes an active part in the story along with the illustrator, the author, and Abina herself. Following the graphic history in Part I, Parts II-V provide detailed historical context for the story, a reading guide that reconstructs and deconstructs the methods used to interpret the story, and strategies for using Abina in various classroom settings.


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Abina and the Important Men is a compelling and powerfully illustrated "graphic history" based on an 1876 court transcript of a West African woman named Abina, who was wrongfully enslaved and took her case to court. The book is a microhistory that does much more than simply depict an event in the past; it uses the power of illustration to convey important themes in world h Abina and the Important Men is a compelling and powerfully illustrated "graphic history" based on an 1876 court transcript of a West African woman named Abina, who was wrongfully enslaved and took her case to court. The book is a microhistory that does much more than simply depict an event in the past; it uses the power of illustration to convey important themes in world history and to reveal the processes by which history is made. The story of Abina Mansah--a woman "without history" who was wrongfully enslaved, escaped to British-controlled territory, and then took her former master to court--takes place in the complex world of the Gold Coast at the onset of late nineteenth-century colonialism. Slavery becomes a contested ground, as cultural practices collide with an emerging wage economy and British officials turn a blind eye to the presence of underpaid domestic workers in the households of African merchants. The main scenes of the story take place in the courtroom, where Abina strives to convince a series of "important men"--a British judge, two Euro-African attorneys, a wealthy African country "gentleman," and a jury of local leaders--that her rights matter. "Am I free?" Abina inquires. Throughout both the court case and the flashbacks that dramatically depict her life in servitude, these men strive to "silence" Abina and to impose their own understandings and meanings upon her. The story seems to conclude with the short-term success of the "important men," as Abina loses her case. But it doesn't end there: Abina is eventually redeemed. Her testimony is uncovered in the dusty archives by Trevor Getz and, through Liz Clarke's illustrations, becomes a graphic history read by people around the world. In this way, the reader takes an active part in the story along with the illustrator, the author, and Abina herself. Following the graphic history in Part I, Parts II-V provide detailed historical context for the story, a reading guide that reconstructs and deconstructs the methods used to interpret the story, and strategies for using Abina in various classroom settings.

30 review for Abina and the Important Men: A Graphic History

  1. 5 out of 5

    Margie

    I had never read a graphic non-fiction book, and I highly recommend this one as a start for others who haven't read many in this genre. It was given to my by my nephew, who as a curator of African Art often travels to Africa. He worked on his thesis in the same library in Ghana where this story first came to light, hidden for 125 years in the archives. Abina was a wrongfully enslaved young woman on the West Coast of Africa in the 1870s who escaped to British territory where slavery had been outl I had never read a graphic non-fiction book, and I highly recommend this one as a start for others who haven't read many in this genre. It was given to my by my nephew, who as a curator of African Art often travels to Africa. He worked on his thesis in the same library in Ghana where this story first came to light, hidden for 125 years in the archives. Abina was a wrongfully enslaved young woman on the West Coast of Africa in the 1870s who escaped to British territory where slavery had been outlawed; she actually had the courage to take her master to court and stated her case under intimidating circumstances. The book is divided into sections which make it enticing and interesting not only to the adult and young adult reader, but a compelling work for the classroom as well. Part I is the Graphic History of Abina which leads into Part II, the Transcript; Part III, Historical Context; Part IV, Reading Guide; and Part V, Abina in the Classroom, including a timeline and reading questions. Besides the graphic section, it is also well illustrated with Maps and Figures. Despite being a Graphic History, this is not a light read. However, the Graphic History section stands alone in telling the amazing story of this courageous young woman who stood up for her rights in an era and a place where the odds were stacked against her. The fact that this story came to light is a tribute to scholars and librarians everywhere.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Jack Greenwood

    After reading Persepolis this month, I immediately went searching for other graphic novels. I had attended a series of 3 online sessions of West African History before the 1600s, delivered by Toby Green and Trevor Getz, professors at UCL and San Francisco State. They were of such high quality that I bought books which each of them had published. Abina and the Important Men is more than just a graphic novel. It's a 5 part analysis of the discipline of history itself. The author seeks to deconstru After reading Persepolis this month, I immediately went searching for other graphic novels. I had attended a series of 3 online sessions of West African History before the 1600s, delivered by Toby Green and Trevor Getz, professors at UCL and San Francisco State. They were of such high quality that I bought books which each of them had published. Abina and the Important Men is more than just a graphic novel. It's a 5 part analysis of the discipline of history itself. The author seeks to deconstruct Abina's tale by making the primary materials available to the reader who can form their own opinion on the veracity of the graphic content. The text is also accompanied by a concise academic history of the period in question as well as a transparent look at the way the novel was produced. This allows the reader to make a judgement on both the facts and the way the historian has interpreted them. It does somewhat take away from the sense of being lost in a story. But a text which aims to be this meta is bound to trade in accuracy for excitement. I mean historians know their work is fascinating, but others don't always see it that way. The tale is limited in scope, but Getz rightfully argues that it is necessary to highlight the plight of the oppressed, who's voices are so often drowned out by those who write history. This is a useful tool for engaging a wider audience in the historical process.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Karen

    In general, I found this book to be highly accessible and fun. However, after having read 60 undergrad 100-level papers which involved analyzing this as both a primary and secondary source, the dangers of doing history in this way became strikingly apparent. Students, at least mine, were unable to recognize places where it should be clear that the author is inserting his interpretation of the events. The most frustrating of these places, and I think a poor choice on Getz's account, comes at the In general, I found this book to be highly accessible and fun. However, after having read 60 undergrad 100-level papers which involved analyzing this as both a primary and secondary source, the dangers of doing history in this way became strikingly apparent. Students, at least mine, were unable to recognize places where it should be clear that the author is inserting his interpretation of the events. The most frustrating of these places, and I think a poor choice on Getz's account, comes at the end of the graphic novel portion where he has Abina state that she "just wanted her story to be heard." Maybe she did, maybe she didn't. Unfortunately, I read essay after essay where students honed in on that sentiment and assumed it to be the entire reason Abina went to court. Should my students be more discerning and perceptive? Yes! But this repeated error demonstrates to me the inherent danger of imposing and ascribing a will where it is unknown(and cannot be discerned from the historical record) to historical figures, and then putting it in an accessible format and thus into the hands of individuals who do not have the skill set to spot these issues. Am I being annoyingly elitist? Probably! However, this present-ist model of thinking, that we can "know the past" is one of the more trepidatious and easy to succumb to elements of studying history. Books like these run the danger of of reinforcing these problems rather than correcting it. That stated, I think Getz does a wonderful job of providing a historical context for Abina, and the inclusion of the actual transcript was fantastically helpful - I just wish he had set the book up so that it came first and not second, and then perhaps the students would have had an easier time seeing what was invented/imagined (within an appropriate historical framework). For lovers of graphic novels, I would definitely add it to your collection.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Edward Sullivan

    A fascinating "graphic history" based on an 1876 court transcript of a West African woman who was enslaved, escaped to British-controlled territory, and took her case to court. The graphic history is followed by an insightful historical context of the story, a reading guide reconstructing and deconstructing the methods used to interpret the story, and strategies for using Abina in classroom settings of various levels. A great study for world history course. A fascinating "graphic history" based on an 1876 court transcript of a West African woman who was enslaved, escaped to British-controlled territory, and took her case to court. The graphic history is followed by an insightful historical context of the story, a reading guide reconstructing and deconstructing the methods used to interpret the story, and strategies for using Abina in classroom settings of various levels. A great study for world history course.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Abriana

    Read this for class, didn't love it. It's a very creative take on history which is cool and all, but it was hard not to be critical of. Read this for class, didn't love it. It's a very creative take on history which is cool and all, but it was hard not to be critical of.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Nina Chachu

    A court case in Cape Coast in 1876 is brought to life as a graphic narrative. This book is obviously meant to be used in educational institutions at all levels from high school to university. I found it very interesting and challenging, yet written in such a way that is easy to understand.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Anna Janero

    I had to read this for a class and it was very interesting to read a non-fiction graphic novel. I like that the author decided to do that because it makes a tough and complicated story more easy and accessible to people of all ages. I think that this is a great book to introduce the Transatlantic Slave Trade to younger kids (maybe around the middle school age). I am so happy that Abina’s story was found. There are very few personal stories that exist from the Transatlantic Slave Trade. It is ext I had to read this for a class and it was very interesting to read a non-fiction graphic novel. I like that the author decided to do that because it makes a tough and complicated story more easy and accessible to people of all ages. I think that this is a great book to introduce the Transatlantic Slave Trade to younger kids (maybe around the middle school age). I am so happy that Abina’s story was found. There are very few personal stories that exist from the Transatlantic Slave Trade. It is extraordinarily important that we hear these stories and learn more about what African slaves went through.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Wendelle

    This short graphic novel shows how evil and oppression can play around the scales of justice, and slavery can mask itself as a legal marriage. It also shows how the writing of history possesses the power to pick and erase certain people.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Monica Edinger

    A bit more about this on my blog. Outstanding. This book seems to have gone under-the-radar in the broader world and it shouldn't have. I had seen something about it a while back and finally had the time to read it and it is fantastic. It is, as the subtitle indicates, a graphic history. That is, it is a history book and one unapologetically didactic. And as far as I know, pretty unique. The book consists of several parts. The first is an illustrated "graphic history" (so described in the flap co A bit more about this on my blog. Outstanding. This book seems to have gone under-the-radar in the broader world and it shouldn't have. I had seen something about it a while back and finally had the time to read it and it is fantastic. It is, as the subtitle indicates, a graphic history. That is, it is a history book and one unapologetically didactic. And as far as I know, pretty unique. The book consists of several parts. The first is an illustrated "graphic history" (so described in the flap copy) based on the 1876 court transcript of an attempt by Abina, a young West African woman in what is now Ghana and was then termed the Gold Coast to convince the "important men" of the court (jury, judge, lawyers, etc) that she was a free woman not enslaved. It might seem to have been a simple case, but it was not. What the author and illustrator do remarkably well is articulate the complexity of the situation. That is, while slavery by then had been long ostensibly been outlawed in the British Empire (of which the Gold Coast was part) there had also been tacit overlooked versions of it being maintained by wealthy men who helped supply the palm oil then eagerly wanted in Europe. The graphic novel part of the book is moving, compelling, and riveting. The art is well done and artist and author have done an excellent job weaving together what they know with what they imagined about the case and Abina. ( The author says this isn't historical fiction and I suppose it isn't a novel, but he and the illustrator have had to imagine things so I'm not sure what it is then.) But that isn't all. The graphic story is followed by a facsimile of the transcript, and then a section titled "Historical Context" that provides a clear series of essays on a variety of relevant topic such as "The British Civilizing Mission," "Slavery in the Gold Coast," and "The Atlantic Slave Trade and Abolition." Next comes a section titled "Reading Guide" that is fantastic. The author unpacks the many troubling aspects of attempting to consider the many aspects of the story. And so he considers "Whose Story is This?," "Is this a 'True' Story?," and "Is This 'Authentic' History?" Finally, there is a section on "Abina in the Classroom" with different ways of using it. While the focus is on college teaching, it is clearly accessible to high school students too. The book closes with excellent back matter including the preliminary sketches by the artist for the comic. There are many, many reasons to find and read this book and to get it into the hands of teens, those who teach high school world history, and more. Not to mention it seems perfection for those needing to address Common Core issues. (For those interested in classroom use I recommend exploring H-Net's Abina Forum which has a number of posts related to its use in the college classroom.) The most important reason for me is that this is a smart and beautifully done attempt to bring to life one of the silenced. As the author notes, history is told by use of material that we have about the past and too often we don't have anything about so many because they did not leave paper trails. We happen to know about Abina because someone left a transcript of her court case. And because Getz made it his mission to get it out to us. Highly, highly HIGHLY RECOMMENDED.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Chris Gager

    I only skimmed and browsed this book. Don't recall where I found it. The graphic part is kind of ... average and uninteresting, probably because it was meant to be serious. The entire book is a work of history, as it examines the persistence of slavery in the Gold Coast(now Ghana) in the later 19th century. I once had a conversation with a guy from Guinea(farther north along the W. African coast) who told me that his father had slaves. That was about 1998 and the guy was almost 60, so that would I only skimmed and browsed this book. Don't recall where I found it. The graphic part is kind of ... average and uninteresting, probably because it was meant to be serious. The entire book is a work of history, as it examines the persistence of slavery in the Gold Coast(now Ghana) in the later 19th century. I once had a conversation with a guy from Guinea(farther north along the W. African coast) who told me that his father had slaves. That was about 1998 and the guy was almost 60, so that would put the slave-owning at about 1940. It probably still exists in various places, even in the USA, where wealthy, immigrant East Indian families have been known to "possess" housekeepers.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Douglas

    THIS EXCELLENT BOOK is comprised of three parts. The graphics, the transcripts, and a historical/reading guide/questions that address women's rights as well as racial inequality. A good gateway into colonialism and the collusion of some of Africans. THIS EXCELLENT BOOK is comprised of three parts. The graphics, the transcripts, and a historical/reading guide/questions that address women's rights as well as racial inequality. A good gateway into colonialism and the collusion of some of Africans.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Tracey

    "Philosopher and historian Michel-Rolph Trouillot says that history is an act of silencing, in which those without power are silenced and those with power are able to speak. This silencing takes place in four stages: First, only some perspectives on the past are ever recorded as documents. Others--the perspectives of the poor, the powerless, the illiterate--are never heard. Second, only some documents ever make it to be archived. Others are lost to decay or consigned to the trash. Third, only so "Philosopher and historian Michel-Rolph Trouillot says that history is an act of silencing, in which those without power are silenced and those with power are able to speak. This silencing takes place in four stages: First, only some perspectives on the past are ever recorded as documents. Others--the perspectives of the poor, the powerless, the illiterate--are never heard. Second, only some documents ever make it to be archived. Others are lost to decay or consigned to the trash. Third, only some archived material is ever turned into histories by historians who decide what is important enough to write about, and what isn't. Finally, only some histories are chosen by the powerful to be in the canon, the list of great books and important topics that are widely read. Following her testimony, the book was closed on the story of Abina Mansah for 125 years. She was indeed silenced by history...As if nobody had heard her at all..." And then in 2012 this graphic history gets published and Abina's story finds itself at the center of a very interesting text. This book is half graphic history (comic format) and the other half is written in traditional text and contains academic research, including primary source material (court transcript), pedagogical on how to teach this text, and definitions related to the study of history and what it means to be a historian. I really like the comic portion of this text and I found myself wondering how Abina managed to gather the courage to sue her former master and I wanted more of her backstory. And, as a HUGE BONUS for all the research loving nerds out there, the resource material in the back is amazing and it really made me think about the study of history and the texts that are used to teach/study history. It also does an excellent addressing how one would go about vetting source material and dealing with bias, including one's own as it relates to the topic and source material.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Jessica

    History is more than a retelling of a story. There are always several points of view to consider. One must also recognize that just because a person was not wealthy, in a seat of power or a well-known citizen should not invalidate what perspective a person has to offer. We are realizing that people of low status or impoverished or slaves have often not had their stories archived. In the past it was was (sadly and horribly) thought that their stories would not have much to offer. However, we have History is more than a retelling of a story. There are always several points of view to consider. One must also recognize that just because a person was not wealthy, in a seat of power or a well-known citizen should not invalidate what perspective a person has to offer. We are realizing that people of low status or impoverished or slaves have often not had their stories archived. In the past it was was (sadly and horribly) thought that their stories would not have much to offer. However, we have realized that is wrong. Every single ancestor has something we can learn from their life. Abina is the hope that this can be righted. Her story came from a manuscript of a trial she was a part of. Thanks to the historians/writers of this story her voice is no longer silenced. She can show us the being a slave did not have to mean one was beaten and starved. it simply meant she did not have the freedom to make her own decisions for her life. This graphic novel form offers a great way to educate people via the story and artwork. Enjoyable and found this to be an important topic. One I cannot ignore.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Shannon Wyss

    An interesting book, both in its account of a girl/woman* enslaved in the Gold Coast in the last 1800s and of how stories like this are lost, found, and retold. The supplemental material takes up well over 1/2 the book but, while not engrossingly interesting, does add significantly to the story. *Whether Abina Mansah is a girl or woman is very confusing. The text refers to her multiple times as a girl. She also says that, in the house where she was enslaved, the oldest other enslaved girl was 13. An interesting book, both in its account of a girl/woman* enslaved in the Gold Coast in the last 1800s and of how stories like this are lost, found, and retold. The supplemental material takes up well over 1/2 the book but, while not engrossingly interesting, does add significantly to the story. *Whether Abina Mansah is a girl or woman is very confusing. The text refers to her multiple times as a girl. She also says that, in the house where she was enslaved, the oldest other enslaved girl was 13. It is unclear whether the 13-year-old was older than Abina herself. The illustrations, however, clearly show Abina as a fully-grown woman (who also goes from being shirtless when her back is to the reader to clothed when she's forward-facing, all instantaneously and within the same scene). Either the illustrator, Liz Clarke, is collapsing "woman" with "girl" in a very sexist way or Clarke is "aging" a West African girl into adulthood, thereby perpetuating racist notions of Black children as older and more mature than they actually are. Still, a book that is worth reading.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Beth Ann Ditkoff

    This graphic history is divided into five parts. The first part is the graphic history itself which is beautifully illustrated with compelling dialogue. In this graphic section, Abina, a West African slave in 1876 goes to court to protest her wrongful enslavement. The second section of the book is the actual transcript of the trial, allowing the reader to compare the graphic depiction with the archival material. The third section provides the historical context for the trial including informatio This graphic history is divided into five parts. The first part is the graphic history itself which is beautifully illustrated with compelling dialogue. In this graphic section, Abina, a West African slave in 1876 goes to court to protest her wrongful enslavement. The second section of the book is the actual transcript of the trial, allowing the reader to compare the graphic depiction with the archival material. The third section provides the historical context for the trial including information about West Africa, slavery and the British Civilizing Mission. The fourth section of the book is a reading guide, and the final section includes essays by noted experts in the field commenting on Abina and her place in history. Overall the book is extremely thoughtful and well executed. I recommend this book for nonfiction readers who are interested in exploring a graphic expression of history.

  16. 5 out of 5

    J Dev

    An extraordinary book that should be read as more than a graphic history. In fact, the graphic novel portion was far from what made the book great. While the illustrations help readers visualize and engage with the primary source, a fairly dry court transcript, the best parts of the book are where the writers go back through the process of creating the book and their approaches to writing this kind of history. In the second edition they even go so far as to engage with critics and responses to t An extraordinary book that should be read as more than a graphic history. In fact, the graphic novel portion was far from what made the book great. While the illustrations help readers visualize and engage with the primary source, a fairly dry court transcript, the best parts of the book are where the writers go back through the process of creating the book and their approaches to writing this kind of history. In the second edition they even go so far as to engage with critics and responses to the books, adding a new section and literally going back and making changes based on feedback. The discussions of the local history, plus introductions to historical questions of gender, the colonial encounter and slavery add rich context for understanding the narrative. Rarely, if ever, have I encountered a book that is so transparent about the writing process as this one.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Anne

    This graphic history is an adaptation of a court transcript of a girl who took her slave owner to court in 1876 West Africa. She lost the case, but her story remained in that transcript until historian Trevor R. Getz teamed up with artist Liz Clarke to recreated Abina's life in this non-fiction graphic novel. I really enjoyed this book, especially with the historical context explained in the back. I don't read that many graphic novels, and I love how this book attempts to combine the lightness o This graphic history is an adaptation of a court transcript of a girl who took her slave owner to court in 1876 West Africa. She lost the case, but her story remained in that transcript until historian Trevor R. Getz teamed up with artist Liz Clarke to recreated Abina's life in this non-fiction graphic novel. I really enjoyed this book, especially with the historical context explained in the back. I don't read that many graphic novels, and I love how this book attempts to combine the lightness of a graphic novel with the complexity of history. I highly recommend this book if you're curious to learn more about African history but don't want to start with a big, scary textbook.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Mainon

    The graphic novel of this illustrates a long-forgotten case brought by a female slave in the Gold Coast after slavery was supposed to have been ended. I love nonfiction historical graphic novels, and this was accompanied by a transcript of the actual court case, a lot of historical background, discussion questions -- basically everything to make this a teaching unit for a school system. Really neat.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Arielle Bernardin

    I really enjoyed reading this book and learning more about Abina`s story. This book does a great job of giving voice to someone in history that was once voiceless. The fact that this book was a graphic novel made it more interesting to read, Abina`s emotions were felt on each page. Through this book I was also able to see how gender, and money influences societies negatively which can initiate a lot of discussion amongst peers. The only downside was that much of the text is fictionalized. I really enjoyed reading this book and learning more about Abina`s story. This book does a great job of giving voice to someone in history that was once voiceless. The fact that this book was a graphic novel made it more interesting to read, Abina`s emotions were felt on each page. Through this book I was also able to see how gender, and money influences societies negatively which can initiate a lot of discussion amongst peers. The only downside was that much of the text is fictionalized.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Chelsea Martinez

    This seems like such a perfect book for teaching college students (AP History students?) about the process of doing academic historical research. It takes a seemingly slight bit of historical data and adds layers and layers of research, historical context, and differing perspectives on the story, benefiting from a second edition in a way few books I have read do. I loved it.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Laura

    Bought this in the hope that I could use it with high school students, and after reading, have decided against it for now. While interesting for me, it's just not emotionally compelling enough for them. Bought this in the hope that I could use it with high school students, and after reading, have decided against it for now. While interesting for me, it's just not emotionally compelling enough for them.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Emily Hutton

    Really amazing to read this type of story in comic form. I hope that more people focus on unique historical/culturally relevant graphic novels. The only thing bringing this down to a 3 was the art style, which I am personally not a big fan of. Otherwise, it was a really good read.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Katelyn

    This book invites discussion on how history is perceived and portrayed. It encourages you to interact with the history while looking at different viewpoints, labels, and interpretations. I also love how the story uses the graphic novel style which is a unique way to interact with history.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Karen (The Book Rookie)

    An important story that was poorly executed. The text felt forced and the illustrations were rough. DNF

  25. 4 out of 5

    Kcjones

    important book but rather boring

  26. 4 out of 5

    Michael-Ann Cerniglia

    A graphic ‘novel’ created from a primary source, this is a great book to use in the classroom. Rich in detail and history, and very accessible and captivating.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Carly Wynn

    This book does a really good job of opening the reader’s eyes to individual aspects of history not necessarily considered before.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Eric Blickensderfer

    This is a great representation of the history of the slave trade of a single woman in Africa. Would recommend to anyone interested in the topic.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Cat Weaver

    I really like this approach to writing history.

  30. 5 out of 5

    B

    I love that this book was made for the classroom. It was meant to be a source for the enlightenment of others. And I wish that I had it in school when I was growing up.

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