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JASON BOURNE RETURNS FROM THE SHADOWS AS THE WORLD'S #1 ASSASSIN… Once, Jason Bourne was notorious in the clandestine world of covert-ops as one of the CIA's most expert international killers for hire. Out of the ashes of his violent past he's emerged today as a Georgetown professor, living a quiet life, retired from danger—until he narrowly escapes the bullet of a faceless JASON BOURNE RETURNS FROM THE SHADOWS AS THE WORLD'S #1 ASSASSIN… Once, Jason Bourne was notorious in the clandestine world of covert-ops as one of the CIA's most expert international killers for hire. Out of the ashes of his violent past he's emerged today as a Georgetown professor, living a quiet life, retired from danger—until he narrowly escapes the bullet of a faceless assassin. And when two of Bourne's closest associates are murdered, Bourne knows that his legacy has followed him—and set him up as prime suspect for the brutal crimes. AND THE WORLD'S #1 TARGET. The quicksand of lies and betrayals is deeper than Bourne ever imagined. Hunted by the CIA as a dangerous rogue agent, he has only one option to stay alive—and one last chance to stay one step ahead of an unseen assailant whose vengeance is personal. Pursued across the globe, Bourne's on the run, and on the edge of discovering the truth—that he's become the expendable pawn in an international terrorist plot. One that's taking every living witness with it and plunging Bourne one step closer to the world-shattering consequences of… THE BOURNE LEGACY


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JASON BOURNE RETURNS FROM THE SHADOWS AS THE WORLD'S #1 ASSASSIN… Once, Jason Bourne was notorious in the clandestine world of covert-ops as one of the CIA's most expert international killers for hire. Out of the ashes of his violent past he's emerged today as a Georgetown professor, living a quiet life, retired from danger—until he narrowly escapes the bullet of a faceless JASON BOURNE RETURNS FROM THE SHADOWS AS THE WORLD'S #1 ASSASSIN… Once, Jason Bourne was notorious in the clandestine world of covert-ops as one of the CIA's most expert international killers for hire. Out of the ashes of his violent past he's emerged today as a Georgetown professor, living a quiet life, retired from danger—until he narrowly escapes the bullet of a faceless assassin. And when two of Bourne's closest associates are murdered, Bourne knows that his legacy has followed him—and set him up as prime suspect for the brutal crimes. AND THE WORLD'S #1 TARGET. The quicksand of lies and betrayals is deeper than Bourne ever imagined. Hunted by the CIA as a dangerous rogue agent, he has only one option to stay alive—and one last chance to stay one step ahead of an unseen assailant whose vengeance is personal. Pursued across the globe, Bourne's on the run, and on the edge of discovering the truth—that he's become the expendable pawn in an international terrorist plot. One that's taking every living witness with it and plunging Bourne one step closer to the world-shattering consequences of… THE BOURNE LEGACY

30 review for The Bourne Legacy

  1. 4 out of 5

    K.D. Absolutely

    One of the biggest showbiz news last year here in the Philippines was the shooting of the supposedly movie adaptation of this book, The Bourne Legacy. It lasted for almost two months and caused horrendous traffic in Manila. I was not able to watch any part of the shooting and missed the regular showing of the movie during its theater run. However, I watched the movie the first time it appeared in Blu-Ray. Thank you, St. Francis Square for my pirated DVD. I love the movie. In fact, I love all the One of the biggest showbiz news last year here in the Philippines was the shooting of the supposedly movie adaptation of this book, The Bourne Legacy. It lasted for almost two months and caused horrendous traffic in Manila. I was not able to watch any part of the shooting and missed the regular showing of the movie during its theater run. However, I watched the movie the first time it appeared in Blu-Ray. Thank you, St. Francis Square for my pirated DVD. I love the movie. In fact, I love all the Bourne movies. So when I saw a second-hand copy of this book by Eric Van Lustbader, I bought this right away. I said I would like to read more about how Lustbader depicted Manila in the story. 2012 Shooting of Robert Ludlum's fourth Bourne movie, "The Bourne Legacy." Location: City of Manila Unfortunately, the story in the book is different from that of the movie. I only found that out when I was in the first 50 pages of the book. In a way, that disappointed me and to be honest, started my ill feeling towards this book. The story is typical of the Jason Bourne series or books in this genre. Nothing really extraordinary but this suspense-thriller genre has a formula and I have no problem with it. What does not really sit well in this fourth book in the series is the cashing out of the Jason Bourne being an ex-Vietnam soldier. It was pointed out by one of my friends here in Goodreads that the Vietnam War ended in 1975 and this book was published in 2004. By around that time, Jason Bourne should be in his 50's and his son should at least be in his 30's at the very least. His son can still do all the action but somebody in his 50's who has not seen action because he went back to his real persona as the college professor David Webb? I thought it would have been nearly impossible for him to do all those non-stop fighting, car chasing, bomb detonation, running, etc. I think the Ludlum Estate is stretching too far the Jason Bourne series that Robert Ludlum actually intended only as a trilogy. Matt Damon made this series really popular that Ludlum Estate wants to squeeze out up to the last single drop of income out from Bourne's fans. That is very sad because it compromises the believability of the story and makes readers (and moviegoers) look like they already stopped thinking for themselves. Also, I suggest that the use of amnesia to provide conflict in the story should be left to romance writers. Amnesia rarely happens and Jason Bourne forgetting that he is David Webb because of the death of his family in Cambodia should have ended beautifully like that. When he gets cured, he reverts back to being college professor David Webb and he forgets being Jason Bourne. However, in this book, Eric Van Lustbader wanted to extend the thrill of the trilogy so he decided to subject David Webb again to some kind of trauma by killing his 2 friends and framing him in the process. So, the professor again dons the Robert Bourne persona just like Spiderman getting into his red suit to do some action. This is crazy and too unbelievable. It is as if the character can be switched on and off like a walking doll or a computer game. I just don't get this book. No wonder, the movie people chose not to use Eric Van Lustbader's plot. It's nice to be reassured that Hollywood people are considering the IQ of their target moviegoers. Something that cannot be said for Lustbader and his target readers.

  2. 4 out of 5

    James

    The fourth Bourne novel, but the first without Robert Ludlum at the helm. Sadly it shows, and Eric Van Lustbader's inexperience shines through. Inexperience, or possibly pressure from the publishers to get the book out there. Lustbader seems to feel nervous in the early parts of the novel and falls back on some overly purple-prose and alliterative-adjectives to cover up the lack of action. Instead these become a huge distraction themselves. Once the story kicks in the 'style' becomes much less o The fourth Bourne novel, but the first without Robert Ludlum at the helm. Sadly it shows, and Eric Van Lustbader's inexperience shines through. Inexperience, or possibly pressure from the publishers to get the book out there. Lustbader seems to feel nervous in the early parts of the novel and falls back on some overly purple-prose and alliterative-adjectives to cover up the lack of action. Instead these become a huge distraction themselves. Once the story kicks in the 'style' becomes much less obvious and Lustbader seems to find a pace he feels more comfortable with. For no apparent reason Jason Bourne, as David Webb, is targeted for assassination by Khan (an uber-assassin (view spoiler)[who also believes he is Bourne's long-dead son (hide spoiler)] ). However both Khan and Bourne are being played against each other by a shadowy, power-hungry, figure – Spalko – who is pulling their (and other people's) strings for his own, unknown, purposes. They are led a merry chase from the US to France, to Hungary and then on to Iceland for the well-telegraphed anti-terrorism summit. While the story is exciting, and you're always rooting for Bourne (and at some points for Khan too), the story between Bourne and Khan is almost totally unconnected to the story with Spalko and the Icelandic summit. Spalko triggers the Bourne/Khan sub-plot, but it serves no purpose toward his main objective. He would almost certainly have stood more chance of success if he'd not tried to get Bourne involved at all. Bourne would have stayed at home mourning the deaths of his friends, but that would have been it. After four novels of the series, we're all pretty aware that Bourne is a super-spy. His training from Conklin in Vietnam made him the best in the world. Yet, repeatedly, Khan is able to follow him without Bourne noticing. Khan is able to 'guess' the direction Bourne has taken. And all to often, Khan manages to get to where Bourne is going before Bourne does. Pretty impressive when you're following someone. Even more impressive when you're following someone who isn't too sure where he's going himself. Finally, further proof to me that this book was a rushed job, with the Ludlum estate pressuring Lustbader to get something out there quickly to capitalise on the success of the Bourne Identity film, was that the book having been split into three sections, had them labelled: parts one and two, but followed by book three? The book reeked of rushed cashing in – the only saving grace being the somewhat exciting pace of the story.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Holly

    If you are a fan of the original Jason Bourne book Trilogy written by Robert Ludlum, then you know that the movies are a very loose representation of the story. That isn't a negative comment. When you take a book that is probably 20-25 hours worth of reading and condense it into a 2 hour movie, changes will be have to be made. The reason I'm pointing this out is because the Bourne books that are written by Eric Van Lustbader are more in line with the movie trilogy than the original book trilogy If you are a fan of the original Jason Bourne book Trilogy written by Robert Ludlum, then you know that the movies are a very loose representation of the story. That isn't a negative comment. When you take a book that is probably 20-25 hours worth of reading and condense it into a 2 hour movie, changes will be have to be made. The reason I'm pointing this out is because the Bourne books that are written by Eric Van Lustbader are more in line with the movie trilogy than the original book trilogy by Ludlum. For example, the book trilogy includes a wife and kids that are never part of the movies. The book trilogy lets Bourne have trusted friends, while the movie shows him as a total loner except for a girlfriend who dies. The final book in the original trilogy has Bourne experience aches and pains due to age because he lacks the physical prowess of his younger years. Obviously the movie has a verile Matt Damon as the undefeatable Bourne. Do you recall Pam from the movies? She is the agent who helps him in the end, and she doesn't even exist in the books. I think these things are important to note, because if you are a fan of the movie trilogy, then Lustbaders writing will probably feel more familiar to the characters you are used to. I think movie fans will enjoy this book. In fact, I think this book would make a great 4th movie in the series. I could picture the movie in my mind while I read the book. I liked it a lot. I like the original Bourne books by Ludlum also, but I almost consider them a completely different series. Sure the names are the same, but that is just about the only similarity. If you were expecting this book to read like Ludlum, it does not. The authors are different people with different styles of writing. I think you are better off not comparing the two. If you can get past that part, then you might really enjoy this book. It is an exciting spy drama all on it's own.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Tyler Case

    This is easily the worst book that I have ever read. I do not know if this is because the writer is incompetent, there was no critical editing, or there was such pressure from whomever held the license that nobody cared about the quality. Regardless, the result is this pile of filth. Here's the kicker: the story isn't bad. It isn't great, but it is a solid spy novel premise. Jason Bourne is living his life as David Webb, memory holes and all, when his life is threatened by an mysterious assassin. This is easily the worst book that I have ever read. I do not know if this is because the writer is incompetent, there was no critical editing, or there was such pressure from whomever held the license that nobody cared about the quality. Regardless, the result is this pile of filth. Here's the kicker: the story isn't bad. It isn't great, but it is a solid spy novel premise. Jason Bourne is living his life as David Webb, memory holes and all, when his life is threatened by an mysterious assassin. He finds his friends dead and himself framed for their murders. He gets dragged back into his old life as Jason Bourne and deeper into a larger conspiracy as he tries to figure out what is going on. Good, thrilling plot. Ludlum worthy. What destroys this book is the ineptitude of the writing. First, this book takes place in the present day, with cell phones, laptops, and Grand Theft Auto (more on that later). And yet, the author maintains Bourne's origins from the Vietnam era. The Vietnam War lasted from 1955 to 1975, when the last American troops were pulled out, at least thirty years before the "present day," if we base that off of the copy-write date of 2004. Even that is a bit of a stretch, since Ludlum had Bourne have significant diplomatic and undercover career before Identity, which took place in 1980. That makes Bourne at least in his fifties, and more likely in his mid-sixties. However, the author also makes Bourne's son, presumed dead with Webb's family in Cambodia and the reason Webb became Bourne (not a spoiler, it's obvious from the get-go) in his mid-twenties. Bourne actually talks about having his family die about twenty years ago. Which would have been the mid-80s. All of this would have been easily fixed: change the origin, set the book in the eighties or nineties, or do like the movie did and change the main character. Second, the author writes about things that he clearly doesn't know about. At one point, a minor character's internal dialogue reflects on how impressed her son was when she cut him off while driving in Grand Theft Auto. Grand Theft Auto is a single player game. All other concerns with this section, like GTA isn't a game for kids and that the cars handle like bricks, are irrelevant because of this. Here's another: Jason's jeep is spinning out of control and heading for a cliff. So naturally, he puts it in neutral (!!!), but that isn't enough. He needs to turn it off. WHAT? Why? How is turning off a vehicle going to help you regain control? If anything, you'd lose power brakes and steering, two very important things if you are trying to control a car. What this does is it takes the reader and slams him (or her) in the face with something so stupid that you literally cannot stay with the story. Finally, there are the inexplicably poorly written and conceived pieces, where the author was not paying attention to what he was saying. An elevator plummeting down its shaft... for a floor and a half (during which time the character inside the elevator had the time to push a button, realize it wasn't working, pry off a panel, and reconnect some wires). A gun shot rings out, fired by a man holding a silenced pistol. A basement that is pitch black for some characters while others can see clearly (no, they don't have night vision). And, the worst, Jason is sitting in his car, listening to the radio and looking OUT the filthy windows of a diner. These aren't minor, throw-away scenes. Each one of these is a MAJOR plot point. The room being pitch black is what makes one of the bad guys run away, leading to a car chase and the book's finale. In summary, a mediocre story, written without a stitch of talent and allowed to slip through because they knew it would sell anyway.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Ema

    Since I was so enthousiastic about the first Bourne Trilogy, I thought: "why not continuing?". This book (4th in the row) is clearly written by another author, since many things that were important in the first trilogy were not taken into account in this book. Some examples... Bourne is over 50 and clearly felt frustrated about his diminishing physical abilities: in this book it is not even mentioned and Bourne keeps doing things that are very demanding for the body without himself even thinking a Since I was so enthousiastic about the first Bourne Trilogy, I thought: "why not continuing?". This book (4th in the row) is clearly written by another author, since many things that were important in the first trilogy were not taken into account in this book. Some examples... Bourne is over 50 and clearly felt frustrated about his diminishing physical abilities: in this book it is not even mentioned and Bourne keeps doing things that are very demanding for the body without himself even thinking about it. Bourne always missed his wife and 2 children terribly: in this book he never really thinks about them, back hiding somewhere in the US. He doesn't even think of sending them some kind of hidden message that he's doing fine. Although the story as such has quite some suspense in it, I also feel (like many others) that Eric Van Lustbader has not read the first Ludlum books very well, which spoils the 'Bourne-experience' somehow.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Matt

    As the torch of the Bourne series is passed along from Robert Ludlum to Eric van Lustbader, there is some continuity that makes the move seamless, though also some items that I, in my mission to read the series’ books consecutively, have noticed and will address below. That said, the action laid out by the giant Ludlum has continued in this 4th book in the series, even if it is not as thorough as Bourne novel fans may be used to experiencing. For now, though, the action and storyline do seem to As the torch of the Bourne series is passed along from Robert Ludlum to Eric van Lustbader, there is some continuity that makes the move seamless, though also some items that I, in my mission to read the series’ books consecutively, have noticed and will address below. That said, the action laid out by the giant Ludlum has continued in this 4th book in the series, even if it is not as thorough as Bourne novel fans may be used to experiencing. For now, though, the action and storyline do seem to move from one to the other with ease and, if you did not know, you might think that this book was also penned by Ludlum. Some interesting new strategies used in the storyline, as we begin with the now infamous TERRORIST/TERRORISM theme that pervades all books that are tied to political thrillers these days, or so it seems. Biological terrorism makes its first BOURNE appearance, though these are key to Ludlum’s other major series, COVERT ONE (which has also, partially, been taken over by Lustbader). Also, we see the beginning of the ‘USA vs. Bourne’ theme that Hollywood uses to keep the Bourne movies in the upper strata of ratings. We are to believe, as is revealed in the latter part of the book that the oldest Webb child is 11 years old (Jamie) and he was born in or around 1986/87. That would put the book’s setting in 1997-98. There is a strong focus on Arab-aided terrorists, though, I suppose that could be tied to the Chechen terrorists part of the book, which would put, historically, the entire political event (a peace summit) just before the 2nd Chechen war with Russia. Use of SMS would make sense, as it does occur throughout the book, though I am hard-pressed to believe that Bourne/Webb is as agile as he is portrayed in the book. Playing the Damon-like Bourne with his self-defence abilities at the ripe age of 57 or 58 baffles me, though I suppose if Bruce Willis can do it, anyone might be able to do so. I see this as the potential pivot for Lustbader to move away from reality and turn Bourne into some inhuman fighting machine, ignoring time or all the other factors. I suppose we shall see. Kudos Mr. van Lustbader on this seemingly seamless book. I have heard the road ahead gets bumpier, but I prefer to find out for myself!

  7. 5 out of 5

    Tim Rees

    This novel annoyed me. I love the Bourne film series, so thought I'd give this book a go. The plot seems to rely on the most unlikely coincidences... I didn't finish it.

  8. 4 out of 5

    itchy

    fell asleep whilst on the last 50 pages! good thing i was up by 3:00 am; finished and started a new book by 4:00 am. i can see where lustbader apparently doesn't get his facts straight, but since this is my first novel of his, i'm inclined to argue that he could be just copying ludlum still, it's dissatisfying that he had to kill off (view spoiler)[conklin and panov (hide spoiler)] to further his plot p493: the ar-15 he carried was short-barreled, but it made up for any slight inaccuracy with its fell asleep whilst on the last 50 pages! good thing i was up by 3:00 am; finished and started a new book by 4:00 am. i can see where lustbader apparently doesn't get his facts straight, but since this is my first novel of his, i'm inclined to argue that he could be just copying ludlum still, it's dissatisfying that he had to kill off (view spoiler)[conklin and panov (hide spoiler)] to further his plot p493: the ar-15 he carried was short-barreled, but it made up for any slight inaccuracy with its awesome firepower. it used .223-caliber ammo... (i'm not sure if 5.56 mm is really interchangeable with 0.223 inches when it comes to firearm specs) p497: (view spoiler)[khan (hide spoiler)] had taken a kalishnikov...

  9. 5 out of 5

    Wingedbeaver

    This book was an obvious attempt by the publishers to cash in on the popularity of the movies. Van Lustbader, while keeping to the timelines and events of the previous Ludlum novels, decided to ignore much of what was written in The Bourne Ultimatum. It was pretty clear that Ludlam was trying to wrap up the Bourne story with the major focus of his last book being that Bourne was getting much to old to deal with the physical toll being a secret agent puts on one's body. I thought, since the word This book was an obvious attempt by the publishers to cash in on the popularity of the movies. Van Lustbader, while keeping to the timelines and events of the previous Ludlum novels, decided to ignore much of what was written in The Bourne Ultimatum. It was pretty clear that Ludlam was trying to wrap up the Bourne story with the major focus of his last book being that Bourne was getting much to old to deal with the physical toll being a secret agent puts on one's body. I thought, since the word legacy was in the title, that Van Lustbader would try to push the Bourne story forward by passing the thrown on to another agent (much like we see in the trailers to the up coming films) but no, he moved forward throwing Jason Bourne back into the action never mentioning the fact that Bourne has to be over 50 according to the time line that he decided to keep. Although I was getting tired of some aspects of Ludlum's novels by the third installment, I was a big fan of the Bourne books. They were never your typical spy thrillers. There was a feeling of reality and psychology that Ludlum threw into his stories giving them a much deeper meaning then most mass produced main stream novels. Van Lustbader has in no way carried these themes on. I'm sure Ludlum was turning in his grave when the movies butchered and ignored his creation, so I can't imagine what he was doing when this novel came out. The Bourne Legacy is silly, vapid and insulting. By all means, stay away from this book. There is nothing between the two covers except a ridiculous waste of time.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Tricia Douglas

    I think this is my first Jason Bourne book although I have seen a couple of the movies. Like the movies, there is murder and suspense! Jason has "retired" from the CIA and is now a Georgetown professor under a new name. Until he is shot at by an assassin. He is now hunted by the CIA as a rogue agent. Good story but so much like the rest of the Bourne tales.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Jerome

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. My first Bourne book. Didn't like it. The actual story begins with a meeting in which Stephan Spalko hires "Kahn" to assassinate David Webb (Jason Bourne), for no given reason, in fact no plausible reason ever develops. Bourne is too trusting. And that Hungarian evildoer just has WAY too many resources and henchmen. Bourne's son-turned-assassin has a very easy time tracking his elusive father all over the world, across an entire state, and eventually at least two continents.For two thirds of the b My first Bourne book. Didn't like it. The actual story begins with a meeting in which Stephan Spalko hires "Kahn" to assassinate David Webb (Jason Bourne), for no given reason, in fact no plausible reason ever develops. Bourne is too trusting. And that Hungarian evildoer just has WAY too many resources and henchmen. Bourne's son-turned-assassin has a very easy time tracking his elusive father all over the world, across an entire state, and eventually at least two continents.For two thirds of the book Joshua is trying to kill Bourne, because Bourne abandoned him as a child in Cambodia, while believing the boy was dead??? I like the idea of the son coming around and changing his mind from wanting to kill his father to learning to like him, but...couldn't he have another, stronger motif to hate enough to kill? Also, he finds Bourne way too easy every time Bourne evades him. He states that Bourne running through a stream would get some dogs off his trail because they would never pick up the scent - wrong. Dogs find it easier to follow someone when they cross water because they disturb the bottom of the river and the scent is easier to follow. Then he was talking about Bourne stealing the ID of a baggage handler in the US... and then using it in a French airport. Somehow I don't think baggage handlers actually get on the plane and then get off in the destination country to take everything out of the plane. He also talks about Bourne crashing his bike into an "18-wheeler". There aren't any in Europe. Or some French government agent pulled out a tri-band mobile phone so he could phone the US. Why? You only need a tri-band phone if you GO to the US from Europe. Jason Bourne is supposed to be human, even in a novel. His physical ability to withstand hanging on to planes in the air by one arm, jumping on to trucks moving in the opposite direction off a speeding motorcycle, physical beatings beyond belief, swimming for two minutes in freezing water that we are told 50 pages earlier no human can survive in for 30 seconds, etc. is too much. Throughout the book, there are acts of violence that seem to take place right in the middle of public places, yet nobody seems to notice. Two key characters, (I won't mention them in case you still want to read this drivel), in the past books were killed before they said a single word. I don't know what purpose that served if not to relieve Mr. Lustbader of the burden of trying to replicate Ludlum's own characterizations. Yet another key character was not even written into the story until the last four pages. Continuing with that same line, the characters in this story were sometimes very conveniently stupid. I will give an example. When the two murders I mentioned earlier were being investigated, a gun was found on the scene. After checking the gun, it was found that it was registered to David Webb. The report of this information was given to the DCI and he asked about fingerprints. He was told that the fingerprints had been wiped off. "The mark of a professional," said the DCI. Apparently, the Director of Central Intelligence believes it the mark of a professional to wipe the murder weapon clean, then leave the thing at the scene of the crime. What? How can anyone in their right mind believe that this is anything but a set-up? I read this part several times to make sure I had it right. Certainly Lustbader has more faith in his readers than this, doesn't he? No, he doesn't. Another example of this type of thoughtless writing involves another character. This character at one point dyes his hair blond and wears blue contact lenses and a fake nose as a disguise. But, it seems that Mr. Lustbader forgot that he gave this worldly well-known philanthropist a horribly disfiguring burn on one whole side of his face. How could this go unnoticed by the security guards in the story or, for that matter, again, the editors. In the Eric Van Lustbader story, Bourne is carrying a switchblade that seems to be a cross between a Swiss Army knife and a crowbar. You must endure this magic switchblade throughout the entire book. Another annoyance for me was an obvious mental lapse by the author. In one chapter he snatches a carved stone Buddha from his attacker's neck (Bourne's lost son) and a few chapters later, it's miraculously back on that same attacker's neck. The author must have taken a vacation and forgot where he left off. Here are several examples of the sorts of sloppy mistakes that steal the joy of reading this book. 1 - a van Lustbader-invented assassin loads his sniper rifle with "the smallest caliber round it will take." What? Firearms by design and definition require a specific and single caliber of ammunition. Does this guy know nothing? And why in hell would he want the smallest caliber, if indeed there were such a thing? He never explains this weird concept. 2 - He has first-response cops showing up at a crime scene complete with tracking dogs. What? That's something that would be called in later at the discretion of the on-scene commander, rather than something that police officers routinely travel with. 3 - He has the Bourne character checking in with a motel clerk who is watching television. Bourne goes to his room, turns on his own TV, and finds himself featured as a wanted man on all channels. Yet he eats, showers, shaves and rests, never even apparently thinking that the check-in clerk, watching television, might have recognized him and might at that minute be calling out the mountes after him. Check it out if you have nothing else to do.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Karel

    This would have been two stars but for one niggling factor: I couldn't stand the sexism the book was saturated in. Don't get me wrong, I rarely give a shit about sexism and the last thing I had in mind when going into this book was lots of women being badass. But the treatment of women in this book is appalling. Of the six or seven or so women in the book, one was repeatedly referred to as a bitch-woman by her co-workers (which becomes cringe-worthy after the first dozen or so times), one was a This would have been two stars but for one niggling factor: I couldn't stand the sexism the book was saturated in. Don't get me wrong, I rarely give a shit about sexism and the last thing I had in mind when going into this book was lots of women being badass. But the treatment of women in this book is appalling. Of the six or seven or so women in the book, one was repeatedly referred to as a bitch-woman by her co-workers (which becomes cringe-worthy after the first dozen or so times), one was a backstabber, one existed to sleep through the organization and be remarkably controlled by sex despite being a 'smart woman'. One appeared for about two paragraphs to have sex with a - you guessed it - muscle boy officer by way of introducing him. The only two neutral women in the book were dead and missing in action respectively. Now ain't that a message. I'm not really expecting Salt or Lara Croft here, but in this case, I'd rather the author not write about females at all than forcefully put such shallow creatures in there. I found myself cringing every time a woman appears because you know at the end of the day she'll be a slut, stupid, or dead. Beyond that, this was a mammoth pile of unlikely events: strangers who trust Bourne so much they just spill their life's secrets without so much as blinking an eye, getting in and out multiple high security places with nothing more than a pilfered ID tag, a drain large enough for people to crawl through in a villain's impenetrable fortress... and all the assorted action movie things you expect from this genre.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Jay

    This is proving a tough book to read. Since this is not by Ludlum, fans of the original, both the author and Bourne character, are already set up for expectations of disappointment. The characters are somewhat flat and I suspect readers will find it hard to care for the protagonist. Bourne's nemesis seems to have an unreasonably easy time following the supposedly well-trained and supposedly elusive main character across the globe. Bourne also seems to have lost his fantastic close-quarters comba This is proving a tough book to read. Since this is not by Ludlum, fans of the original, both the author and Bourne character, are already set up for expectations of disappointment. The characters are somewhat flat and I suspect readers will find it hard to care for the protagonist. Bourne's nemesis seems to have an unreasonably easy time following the supposedly well-trained and supposedly elusive main character across the globe. Bourne also seems to have lost his fantastic close-quarters combat skills he had in "Identity" since he is repeatedly beaten up by this same thuggish character disadvantaged by a far inferior training level. These tended to tax my already overloaded 'willing suspension of disbelief'. On top of this the writing style doesn't flow for me, with a few common "writer's mistakes" and plot inconsistencies thrown into the mix for good measure. I would not recommend this book, though I finished since I was past critical mass and because, to the author's credit, I do at least want to see Bourne vindicated.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Anna Marie

    I have to admit - I had just finished the first three of Ludlum's books and was disappointed in them. I wanted them to be better than they were, but they were tedious and more and more contrived as they went along. So my *hope* was that Van Lustbader could do better. The first thing he did was enanger me all over again by killing my favorite character. Then I felt insulted by the introduction of the Khan/Bourne hypothesis. After which I felt like I was being run ragged. But then... something happe I have to admit - I had just finished the first three of Ludlum's books and was disappointed in them. I wanted them to be better than they were, but they were tedious and more and more contrived as they went along. So my *hope* was that Van Lustbader could do better. The first thing he did was enanger me all over again by killing my favorite character. Then I felt insulted by the introduction of the Khan/Bourne hypothesis. After which I felt like I was being run ragged. But then... something happened. The sacrifice of my character wasn't in vain. (I still don't like it, but I saw what happened, and could allow it). The Khan/Bourne angle began to hook my heart. And the plot... it was both merciful and just. It was both exciting and riveting. And by the end of the book, I found myself exhaling deeply, as though I were... satisfied. This was unexpected. It was GOOD. And I liked it.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Ric

    I'm half way through this and to be honest I'm forcing myself to continue. I want to like this but it just doesn't feel like the same Bourne as in Ludlum's trilogy. The characters seem to have less depth including Bourne and his inward struggle (that is almost non existent, but to me was a major theme in the originals - Webb/Bourne/Delta). The main characters that you grew to know and love are MIA or dead. I couldn't really care less about Khan. I feel sorry for Marie and David, the trilogy fini I'm half way through this and to be honest I'm forcing myself to continue. I want to like this but it just doesn't feel like the same Bourne as in Ludlum's trilogy. The characters seem to have less depth including Bourne and his inward struggle (that is almost non existent, but to me was a major theme in the originals - Webb/Bourne/Delta). The main characters that you grew to know and love are MIA or dead. I couldn't really care less about Khan. I feel sorry for Marie and David, the trilogy finished nicely, but now after all they went through more tragedy so we can read another book. Maybe this book is better for people who are reading after watching the movies, I wouldn't recommend for fans of the first 3 books.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Kevin Sorensen

    I know quite a few die-hard Bourne fans really ripped Lustbader's attempt to write of Jason Bourne. I'm not sure if they were ripping on the previous books by Ludlum or on the movies, featuring Matt Damon; doesn't matter to me. I enjoyed the book. I don't read these like they were real or historical; they're fiction, for heaven's sake. With all the heavy reading I do, this type of reading let's me escape into another world for a while. Are there inconsistencies? Probably. Were there parts that m I know quite a few die-hard Bourne fans really ripped Lustbader's attempt to write of Jason Bourne. I'm not sure if they were ripping on the previous books by Ludlum or on the movies, featuring Matt Damon; doesn't matter to me. I enjoyed the book. I don't read these like they were real or historical; they're fiction, for heaven's sake. With all the heavy reading I do, this type of reading let's me escape into another world for a while. Are there inconsistencies? Probably. Were there parts that made me suspend belief? Absolutely. That's why it's called "fiction." So, put your mind at ease, turn on that reading light and prepare to not fall asleep early tonight.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Camille Siddartha

    I am not into this kind of shit...I loved the movies though...anyone that was sent to kill me is rotting anyway...some force...my force is everywhere....good book anyway

  18. 4 out of 5

    Christopher Hernandez

    OK...I have finally caught up in the Bourne series and have reached the juncture where Eric Van Lustbader picks up after the late Robert Ludlum. I suppose the overarching idea is to glaze over much of the third book, and then bring the characters more in line with the movie adaptation character. So we now transition from the “well-trained almost super human yet still believable character with split alter egos” David Web from the second book to the “ridiculously damn near super human not quite be OK...I have finally caught up in the Bourne series and have reached the juncture where Eric Van Lustbader picks up after the late Robert Ludlum. I suppose the overarching idea is to glaze over much of the third book, and then bring the characters more in line with the movie adaptation character. So we now transition from the “well-trained almost super human yet still believable character with split alter egos” David Web from the second book to the “ridiculously damn near super human not quite believable character that simply switches to the Bourne identity” character from the movie. To accommodate for this transition, Lustbader in some cases slowly (and in others flat outright) begins to write out characters from previous books. With that said, I now have to change my frame of mind and recognize that Lustbader is going to take creative liberties with the character. I suppose since my introduction to the Bourne character began with the movies, it was not difficult to change gears in perspective. I do recognize that the character from the first two novels was deep and very well written. I also recognize that the late Ludlum pretty much almost destroyed what he had created in the third book. So bringing the book character in line with the movie character seems to be a smart way to continue the attractiveness of the character. So now I am back to Bad Arse Mother F-er (BAMF) fiction. When looking at the Bourne Legacy with my simplified BAMF perspective, this was a fun read. Somehow, I got the feeling like many other reviewers that the main plot could have simply occurred (and had been more successful) without involving Bourne, but you got to shoehorn him in somehow. So now Bourne is once again sent in to save the day to prevent a terrorist action from antagonist Spalko. In addition, we have the introduction of a new character, Khan, as part of a subplot. Without spoilers, Khan is remarkably very Bourne –like sans the specialized training. Even considering the physical commonalities, I found it difficult to believe he could be of a level with Bourne. Yet, I‘ll let it slide…BAMF perspective with fiction and all. There are other inconsistencies that were harder to swallow to include Bourne’s ability to hack into governmental databases simply by what he learned from a sub character. Even with his eidetic memory, he should at least been smart enough to mask any trace-backs. Still….It was still a nice escape from reality, and leaves the potential for Khan splinters. New characters are also introduced like Martin Lindross, while previous characters like the CI Director are made into carbon copy a-holes. Character Deron (possibly related to the character Cactus from books 2 and 3)

  19. 4 out of 5

    David

    Disclaimer : My mom, knowing that I would be watching the film version of Eric Van Lustbader’s The Bourne Legacy on Sunday, decided to buy me a book copy of it. I was forced then to watch the film adaptation of the first three books so things would make sense when I start reading the fourth book. And I have known, right after I was done watching them that I am officially glued with the series. In Eric Van Lustbader’s The Bourne Legacy, Jason Bourne, the notorious international assassin is once ag Disclaimer : My mom, knowing that I would be watching the film version of Eric Van Lustbader’s The Bourne Legacy on Sunday, decided to buy me a book copy of it. I was forced then to watch the film adaptation of the first three books so things would make sense when I start reading the fourth book. And I have known, right after I was done watching them that I am officially glued with the series. In Eric Van Lustbader’s The Bourne Legacy, Jason Bourne, the notorious international assassin is once again back to his real identity – David Webb as a linguistics professor at Georgetown University. Here is where he tries to have a normal life with her new wife Marie, and two children, Jamie and Alyssa. The action started to kick in when a silenced gunshot misses David’s head while he was in uni, and right through that moment, that he knew, he has yet to be back in his Jason Bourne persona again. Maybe I am in no position to go into details but this book mainly revolved about the Bio-Chemical Weapon with a code name of NX-20 invented by friends Dr. Schiffer and Sido, that has been brought to the wrong hands and is set to kill a hundred lives. It has been through David’s pursuit of knowing who had tried to kill him that he was able to find out that it was his son, Joshua, whom he thought had died in Phnom Penh, back when he was still living a quiet life with his first family. And along the way, David found himself working with Joshua as they were gradually being able to unlock the mysteries behind the planned assassination, their friends being locked up and killed, and their successful intent of stopping the release of the biochemical weapon. It was an adrenaline rush galore, and most of the scenes were grippingly intense. But what I like about this book was that it has also tackled the concept of family and betrayal. I was dumbstruck to find out that David had almost been killed by his own son, and the several set ups and constant manipulation through some of the most intense parts of the book really got me on my nerves. The ending has also been heartwarming as the truth has finally been set free. And so I still wish to find out more about Jason Bourne’s adventure because it feels like I have already come to admire the story that the author has set for him, so I think I have to buy the next books soon.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Aparna

    Stars: 5 / 5 Recommendation: A fantastical spy tale taking the readers into the life of Jason Bourne again, involving a high-end chess game where the pawns are real people who evade dangers at every turn of the page to survive. The Bourne Legacy is the fourth book in the spy action thriller series Jason Bourne, written by Eric Van Lustbader, published in June of 2004. The character was originally created by Robert Ludlum, however after his death, Lustbader picked up the character and continued the Stars: 5 / 5 Recommendation: A fantastical spy tale taking the readers into the life of Jason Bourne again, involving a high-end chess game where the pawns are real people who evade dangers at every turn of the page to survive. The Bourne Legacy is the fourth book in the spy action thriller series Jason Bourne, written by Eric Van Lustbader, published in June of 2004. The character was originally created by Robert Ludlum, however after his death, Lustbader picked up the character and continued the series. This book picks up a few years after The Bourne Ultimatum plot. David Webb is now settled as a professor in linguistics in Georgetown University with his wife Marie St. Jacques Webb and kids, Jamie & Alison. But someone is trying to kill him again. In pursuing the marksman, David lands into a double murder and becomes the prime suspect. Now the puppeteers are moving him again, and corralling him to the very path they want him to go. And David has no choice but to bring back Jason Borne to life in order to find his marksman as well as outsmart the puppeteers. Having not read The Bourne Ultimatum, and knowing the movie is very different from the book, I might have missed some of the character continuation. However it helped that Lustbader brings to the reader's attention what went on in the first three books. Considering that The Bourne Legacy was written 14 years after the last book, it was a good refresher. And brings some part of it to forefront thus creating a thread to tie to the original Bourne books. But the reminiscence by Bourne keeps repeating many many times making it a drawl. Contrary to how Ludlum had written the first three books, Lustbader changed the format. He made the entire book into parts - Part One where he builds up the chase for Jason, Part Two the plot thickens with multiple antagonists converging and Part Three gives the grand finale. Lustbader creates Bourne's antagonist his exact replica but with darker shades of grey than that Bourne carried. They are well matched in speed, skill, strength and cunningness. After reading the entire book it only made it fitting, but for most part of the book it bothered me that the antagonist was getting better of Bourne and Bourne was cutting it too close one too many times. It is interesting that Lustbader didn’t sugar coat anything in the plot. Be it showing the cruelty of the antagonist with no care of anyone; or exposing the very existing sexual and racial discrimination even at the highest level in politics. All these still exist in this world now, a good 16 years after this book was written. Contrast to that Lustbader takes great steps to explain about LAN (Local Area Network) or GPS (Global Positioning System), Firewall, etc, which were new for 2004 but are totally embedded into the thread of everyone's lives in this age and time. How timely I picked this book to read I must say. Coincidence or clairvoyance, I don’t know. However, as we are living through this pandemic trying to keep our lives safe as well as others, Lustbader bases his plot on a similar kind of pandemic that need to be stopped. It is scary that unintentionally I picked such a book. One interesting piece of info. Lustbader dedicates this book in memory of Bob. I assume it is Robert Ludlum here that he is talking about. Universal Pictures made a fourth movie in the Bourne series titled the same as this book. However, the entire film is completely different from the book and in fact doesn’t revolve around Jason Bourne but a new character, Aaron Cross, who was built in the mold of Bourne. Having seen the film, it was quite a surprise to read the book. After reading the book I can see where Lustbader was talking Bourne's Legacy to and why the film producers took it in a totally different direction. Yet both book and movie show Bourne's Legacy in it's own unique way. Another fantastic spy tale taking us into the world of master criminals planning for world dominance while the cursed spy is pushed to thwart the plans, all the while saving himself from being killed in the process. Lustbader has indeed kept Ludlum's legacy alive and well. Spoiler Alerts: 1. Plot Reveals: a. Alexander "Alex" Conklin and Morris "Mo" Panov, David/Jason's only best friends and confidantes are murdered. b. In The Bourne Supremacy, Undersecretary Edward Newington McAllister is promoted to be the chairman of the National Security Council. However we get introduced to Roberta Alonzo-Ortiz as the National Security Advisor. Is McAllister replaced by Roberta and the title changed? Or are they wo different roles completely? c. It is revealed that Khan is Bourne's son Joshua from his first marriage who was deemed killed along with his daughter and wife in Phnom Penh. He comes to know of the conspiracy by the government in hiding the truth about Joshua. d. In the end of this plot as well, Spalko is shot and is thrown into the icy ocean in Iceland. However, it is not revealed that his body has been found. So will he resurface again? 2. Sub-Plots: a. Conspirators who corral David/Jason again into a fight to survive for greater good are: Stepan "Shaykh" Spalko, disguised as a Hungarian Humanitarian; Chechen Rebels (Hasan Arsenov, head; Zina Hassiyev, Hasan's lover and his right-hand (wo)man; Magomet; Akhmet); Dr. Peter Sido, an epedimiologist; Annaka Vadas, daughter of Janos Vadas who was a friend of Alex; b. Various Agency people hunting Bourne: Kurt, Director of CIA; Martin Lindros, Deputy Director of CIA; Jamie Hull, Head of American Security in Iceland Summit; Roberta Alonzo-Ortiz, the National Security Advisor; Randy Driver, Director of Tactical Non-lethal Weapons Dept.; c. Local Law Enforcement working with the Conspirators: Detective Harry Harris; Inspector Alain Savoy of the Quai d'Orsay; Justine Berard, Savoy's agent; Detective Csilla; d. People who come to the Webbs' aid: Jack Kerry, a truck driver; Leonard Fine, a tailor; Deron, a forger; Jacques Robbinet, French Minister of Culture; Mylene "Mlle." Dutronc, Alex's lover; Ethan Hearn, Khan's mole in Spalko's company; Boris Illyich Karpo, Director of the FSB's Alpha Unit e. In the very first book The Bourne Identity, we see that Carlos escapes in the end from Bourne, and that he is only one who knows how Carlos looks like. This character hadnt been expanded since. Lustbader references to Carlos again in this plot as well. So will Carlos be part of one of the books that Lustbader has written in this series since this book? One only can tell after reading those books I suppose. f. Jason Bourne resigns the CIA in this. However his son Joshua "Khan" Webb doesn’t join the family yet. So am guessing Lustbader's future books will focus on Joshua, or perhaps both Jason and Joshua. g. Some of the books and media Ludlum mentions along the plot: i. Dhalgren by Samuel Delany from 1974. ii. 1954 Hungarian film Underground by Emir Kusturica. 3. Grammatical / Character / Location / Geographical / Historical / Mythological Errors: a. On Pg. 548, Line 9 from bottom, shouldn’t it be "…chance of it being…"? b. Lustbader mentions about Republican Presidents adorning the walls of the US President's office. What about the Democrat Presidents? Arent their portraits present in the Oval Office or White House?

  21. 5 out of 5

    Bryce

    No one will can ever duplicate the novels of Robert Ludlum. However, Eric Van Lustbader did a masterful job continuing the story of Jason Bourne in the Bourne Legacy. I found the book to capture my interest from the first pages. I am interesed to see if Van Lustbader can maitain the intensity in the continuing series of Bourne Novels(1.The Bourne Legacy - (2004); 2.The Bourne Betrayal - (2007); 3.The Bourne Sanction - (2008); 4.The Bourne Deception - (2009); 5.The Bourne Objective - (2010); 6.Th No one will can ever duplicate the novels of Robert Ludlum. However, Eric Van Lustbader did a masterful job continuing the story of Jason Bourne in the Bourne Legacy. I found the book to capture my interest from the first pages. I am interesed to see if Van Lustbader can maitain the intensity in the continuing series of Bourne Novels(1.The Bourne Legacy - (2004); 2.The Bourne Betrayal - (2007); 3.The Bourne Sanction - (2008); 4.The Bourne Deception - (2009); 5.The Bourne Objective - (2010); 6.The Bourne Dominion - (2011); 7.The Bourne Imperative - (2012) I was excited to see announcment of the release of the film "The Bourne Legacy" in August 2012, but was dissappointed to find it not only doesn't star Matt Damon, but is not based on the book. That may have more to with the fact that Paul Greengrass, the director of the last two Bourne films announced in November 2009 he was not interested in directing. Matt Damon has since said that he will not make the film without Greengrass. The film "Bourne Legacy" is directed by Tony Gilroy and has a completly new story/screenplay wirtten by George Nilfi. "On October 11, 2010 Gilroy was confirmed as the director of the film, and that Jason Bourne would not be in The Bourne Legacy although it retains the name Bourne as to identify it as a continuity to the franchise. The film will not take place in a new canon; it will not be a reboot or prequel in any way, but more likely a "sidequel" or full spin-off with a new character in the mold of Bourne dealing with the ramifications of the Treadstone conspiracy." With the cast of Jeremy Renner, Rachael Weisz, Joan Allen, Edward Norton, Albert Finney, and Scott Glenn it can still be a great addition to the Bourne franchise. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Bour...

  22. 4 out of 5

    Mdaly

    I hate to admit I even read such a dreadful book. I know I wasn't expecting Tolstoy but I was hoping it would be similar to 'Jack Reacher', I was sadly mistaken. The movie of this book which has a completely different plot is a masterpiece in comparison to this waste of forestry. The plot is risible; the characters are unbelievable; the dialogue is cliched, and the women characters are simply objects. I know this wasn't penned by Robert Ludlum but if his estate think this is an acceptable book t I hate to admit I even read such a dreadful book. I know I wasn't expecting Tolstoy but I was hoping it would be similar to 'Jack Reacher', I was sadly mistaken. The movie of this book which has a completely different plot is a masterpiece in comparison to this waste of forestry. The plot is risible; the characters are unbelievable; the dialogue is cliched, and the women characters are simply objects. I know this wasn't penned by Robert Ludlum but if his estate think this is an acceptable book to be printed with 'his' imprimatur then I won't be reading anymore Ludlum's. I think I perhaps am not its target market, which seems from my reading to be a 15 year old boy. Although I am probably doing a disservice to 15 year old boys. At one point in the book we are told a hardened hit team of Chechen rebels has learned Icelandic 'fluently' to be able to access a world leaders summit in a vegetable van. Seeing as how there are only about half a million Icelanders, one doesn't come across Icelandic lessons like the ubiquitous 'Alliance Francais' or 'Instituto Cervantes'. Was it just me who was left wondering where outside of Iceland could you actually learn the language to such a proficiency as to be able to call yourself 'fluent'? Other crazy plot lines revolve around Bourne's first family gunned down in Vietnam and his still hazy memory. How Jason can hold down a job is beyond me given his precarious mental state. Avoid this like the plague and use your time more usefully watching paint dry instead.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Tom Tischler

    Two men in the middle east are inches away from holding the world in their hands. One is called Dyadya Gourdjieve and the other is known as the Syrian. Special Agent Jack McClure has followed this trail of shadows and deceit right into the arms of Gourdjieve's alluring granddaughter Annika. Th lovers are in Moscow when news of Dyadya failing health brings a slew of vultures circling, all anxious to steal the secrets he spent all of his life building. But when it comes to Dyadya nothing is as it seems Two men in the middle east are inches away from holding the world in their hands. One is called Dyadya Gourdjieve and the other is known as the Syrian. Special Agent Jack McClure has followed this trail of shadows and deceit right into the arms of Gourdjieve's alluring granddaughter Annika. Th lovers are in Moscow when news of Dyadya failing health brings a slew of vultures circling, all anxious to steal the secrets he spent all of his life building. But when it comes to Dyadya nothing is as it seems, Alli Carson the child of a dead US president has become Jack's surrogate daughter but while he is in Russia she becomes the target of a cyper stalker. With no one to trust but her friend Vera Bard Alli is determined to discover the truth but her path forces her to come face to face with her nightmarish past. As these two stories play out Secretary of Defense Dennis Paull with help from detectives Nona Hendryx and Alan Frain follow a trail of lies, corruption, and secret pacts that begins with DC's Head of Detectives and lands at the feet of an old man. A living legend whose heinous evil is very much alive and who is known only as Father Night. Another fine page turning thriller from Eric Van Lustbader. You can do no wrong reading his books they are all guarenteed to keep you turning pages.

  24. 5 out of 5

    VBergen

    This book seems to have been written in a rush: - Part one, part two, book three...? I wonder if Van Lustbader really studied the characters of the Jason Bourne's series because in this book he showed very a very different protagonist: - On the third (Robert Ludlum's) book David was fifty something years old and he was constantly suffering for not being nimble enough like when he was younger. He was already feeling the ravages of the age. Here he is on his mid sixties and he seems to be way mor This book seems to have been written in a rush: - Part one, part two, book three...? I wonder if Van Lustbader really studied the characters of the Jason Bourne's series because in this book he showed very a very different protagonist: - On the third (Robert Ludlum's) book David was fifty something years old and he was constantly suffering for not being nimble enough like when he was younger. He was already feeling the ravages of the age. Here he is on his mid sixties and he seems to be way more agile than then years younger. - Ludlum's Bourne books make the readers close to Jason-David's mind, making him human fighting against and at the same time taking advantage of his past as Bourne, and worrying always about the people he loves. In this book, he even doesn't try to reach his family to check on them. - There was Fun in the previous books! Not here, not at all. - (in Ludlum's books) Jason was always very smart and resourceful enough that he didn't need any artist make-up shop to disguise himself. - When Khan went to the magician's shop, then that was the last straw. - The women here are treacherous and needed to be rescued. - The style doesn't go as smooth and thrilling as Ludlum's.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Jason Bourne

    it looks like Jason Bourne character in the 4th part become attention seeking all of a sudden , Bourne is not conspicuous ... this new Bourne is too conspicuous and attracts too much attention . Bourne didn't have a face , he was a chameleon ... master of disguise but this character is readily visible ... unfortunately the author hadn't really understand the Bourne character "the saying is so true "we see the things as we are not the way they are" the Bourne in fourth book is in complete contr it looks like Jason Bourne character in the 4th part become attention seeking all of a sudden , Bourne is not conspicuous ... this new Bourne is too conspicuous and attracts too much attention . Bourne didn't have a face , he was a chameleon ... master of disguise but this character is readily visible ... unfortunately the author hadn't really understand the Bourne character "the saying is so true "we see the things as we are not the way they are" the Bourne in fourth book is in complete contrast to the first three ( the Bourne identity was a master piece , a man lost his memory, don't know who he is or wt he is, he's in total darkness and on top of that ppl are trying to kill him, only he has with him is his instincts and reflexs and reactions to survive -- and through hard situations and circumstances, to get out of trap he met(not literally) a girl by chance, he took her with him to survive, to live, to get out alive , and she falls for him in the process, and it turns into love story and they fight together to survive, and thank god they get away in the end ) from this first part to it has become shiny Hollywood script . this author don't know how to put life to a character( forget about spellbound, , at least he could have done is -- read the first three books properly . Jason Bourne rest in peace

  26. 4 out of 5

    Elena Cotton

    I started reading- more accurately, listening- to the Bourne novels when I found out one of my favorite audio book narrators, Scott Brick narrated them. Not only did I love Robert Ludlum's writing style and story, but also Brick's strong, charismatic narration. I therefore breezed through the books in the series: Identity, Supremacy, & Ultimatum. They were wonderful and captivating. Then, the 4th book, Legacy, is the first in the series written by Eric Van Lustbader. I was nervous as I began th I started reading- more accurately, listening- to the Bourne novels when I found out one of my favorite audio book narrators, Scott Brick narrated them. Not only did I love Robert Ludlum's writing style and story, but also Brick's strong, charismatic narration. I therefore breezed through the books in the series: Identity, Supremacy, & Ultimatum. They were wonderful and captivating. Then, the 4th book, Legacy, is the first in the series written by Eric Van Lustbader. I was nervous as I began the book, unsure if a different author would change my feelings towards the series, however I felt he seamlessly continued the Bourne saga. (It may have helped that Brick continued to narrate the Legacy audiobook). ........................................ Now, I'm 40 minutes into the 5th audiobook, Betrayal, and I'm ready to pull my hair out. There is a new narrator, Jeremy Davidson, and he pronounces names differently than Brick and has odd accents. There is also a new style to the recording, with special audio effects like gunshots, helicopters, and breezes. The added effects completely distract from the story and I've halted the recording, unsure how to proceed. My first reaction is to pick up a hard copy and read it because I love the series so far, but am afraid they'll become less impressive moving forward.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Margo Kelly

    I enjoyed it! It was not my favorite Bourne book, but it was a good read while out camping. The only reason I gave it four stars instead of five is because the plot dragged in the middle and one of the main characters rambled on too much. But ... that was part of his egotistical character. None-the-less, I found myself skimming his inner monologues. I really enjoyed getting back to the Bourne series. I look forward to reading the next one, but I fear I must only read it when I have time to go fr I enjoyed it! It was not my favorite Bourne book, but it was a good read while out camping. The only reason I gave it four stars instead of five is because the plot dragged in the middle and one of the main characters rambled on too much. But ... that was part of his egotistical character. None-the-less, I found myself skimming his inner monologues. I really enjoyed getting back to the Bourne series. I look forward to reading the next one, but I fear I must only read it when I have time to go from cover to cover. Otherwise, my brain has trouble remembering all the foreign names and locations to keep them all straight. But, maybe I could count reading a Bourne book as brain exercise. haha.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Caren

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. SPOILER ALERT:: Very disappointing in my opinion. Not Ludlum-like at all. Bourne is too trusting. He would never hang out at some woman's apartment soaking in Chopin when he is being hunted by so many people. The son who survived the family slaughter returns with a vengeance? Give me a break. I also didn't buy the Spalko guy with so many resources and followers. Someone mentioned, too many characters floating around, of which I agree. It just didn't feel like the Jason Bourne Ludlum created.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Marcio

    It's mildly entertaining on its own rights, but as a Bourne novel, it was a disappointment. I don't think the writer understands what really makes Jason Bourne/David Webb tick. The book tosses out most of the continuity and concepts from the previous 3 books and replaces it with a bunch of new ideas that don't really work all that well, and ultimately writes a new character that has not a whole lot to do with the original one. Not happy with this one, started reading the sequel with some hope, a It's mildly entertaining on its own rights, but as a Bourne novel, it was a disappointment. I don't think the writer understands what really makes Jason Bourne/David Webb tick. The book tosses out most of the continuity and concepts from the previous 3 books and replaces it with a bunch of new ideas that don't really work all that well, and ultimately writes a new character that has not a whole lot to do with the original one. Not happy with this one, started reading the sequel with some hope, and gave up. Haven't read any of the others either.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Kyle Robidoux

    This is my favorite book that I've ever read. Amazing. Kinda blew my mind that Eric Van Lustbader took on this series from the master (Robert Ludlum) & not only wrote in the style of Mr. Ludlum but actually surpassed any of the previous three books. And I loved those books. If you like the Bourne series, Robert Ludlum, Eric Van Lustbader, thrillers, spy novels or just really good books, you've got to read this book! This is my favorite book that I've ever read. Amazing. Kinda blew my mind that Eric Van Lustbader took on this series from the master (Robert Ludlum) & not only wrote in the style of Mr. Ludlum but actually surpassed any of the previous three books. And I loved those books. If you like the Bourne series, Robert Ludlum, Eric Van Lustbader, thrillers, spy novels or just really good books, you've got to read this book!

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