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Your Playlist Can Change Your Life: 10 Proven Ways Your Favorite Music Can Revolutionize Your Health, Memory, Organization, Alertness, and More

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Unlock the power of the songs in your pocket Maybe you blast the speakers when you need to get pumped up. If that's all you do, though, you're not taking full advantage of the way music can help you. Listen to a slower track first and the one-two punch of the playlist can push you even higher. Overflowing with easy-to-use tips like these, Your Playlist Can Change Your Life Unlock the power of the songs in your pocket Maybe you blast the speakers when you need to get pumped up. If that's all you do, though, you're not taking full advantage of the way music can help you. Listen to a slower track first and the one-two punch of the playlist can push you even higher. Overflowing with easy-to-use tips like these, Your Playlist Can Change Your Life is the first book to offer scientifically proven methods for using your favorite music to enhance your life. You'll discover how you can use the tunes you love to: -Relieve anxiety -Increase your alertness -Feel happier -Organize your brain -Sharpen your memory -Improve your mood -Live creatively -Enhance your ability to fight off stress, insomnia, depression, and even addiction Teaching readers how to customize playlists for a feel-good prescription that has no side effects, Your Playlist Can Change Your Life offers a natural way to a better you simply by listening. GALINA MINDLIN, MD, PHD, is an assistant professor of psychiatry at Columbia University, found of Brain Music Therepy (BMT) in the United States, and clinical and executive director of the BMT Center, NYC. DON DUROUSSEAU, MBA, is a cognitive neuroscientist. He is the founder and chief executive officer of Human Bionics, LLC, and executive director of Peak Neurotraining Solutions, Inc. JOSEPH CARDILLO, PHD, is the author of Be Like Water, among other books, and has taught at various universities.


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Unlock the power of the songs in your pocket Maybe you blast the speakers when you need to get pumped up. If that's all you do, though, you're not taking full advantage of the way music can help you. Listen to a slower track first and the one-two punch of the playlist can push you even higher. Overflowing with easy-to-use tips like these, Your Playlist Can Change Your Life Unlock the power of the songs in your pocket Maybe you blast the speakers when you need to get pumped up. If that's all you do, though, you're not taking full advantage of the way music can help you. Listen to a slower track first and the one-two punch of the playlist can push you even higher. Overflowing with easy-to-use tips like these, Your Playlist Can Change Your Life is the first book to offer scientifically proven methods for using your favorite music to enhance your life. You'll discover how you can use the tunes you love to: -Relieve anxiety -Increase your alertness -Feel happier -Organize your brain -Sharpen your memory -Improve your mood -Live creatively -Enhance your ability to fight off stress, insomnia, depression, and even addiction Teaching readers how to customize playlists for a feel-good prescription that has no side effects, Your Playlist Can Change Your Life offers a natural way to a better you simply by listening. GALINA MINDLIN, MD, PHD, is an assistant professor of psychiatry at Columbia University, found of Brain Music Therepy (BMT) in the United States, and clinical and executive director of the BMT Center, NYC. DON DUROUSSEAU, MBA, is a cognitive neuroscientist. He is the founder and chief executive officer of Human Bionics, LLC, and executive director of Peak Neurotraining Solutions, Inc. JOSEPH CARDILLO, PHD, is the author of Be Like Water, among other books, and has taught at various universities.

30 review for Your Playlist Can Change Your Life: 10 Proven Ways Your Favorite Music Can Revolutionize Your Health, Memory, Organization, Alertness, and More

  1. 4 out of 5

    Rose

    Before I start this review, I should find it appropriate to say I'm a self proclaimed music nut. :) I listen to anything from Soul to Alternative, Progressive Metal to J-Pop and K-Pop, and Jazz to Classical among many other types. My tastes are varied, but they remain dynamic and define who I am as a person. When coming across "Your Playlist Can Change Your Life" - the idea behind the work seemed really fascinating - using music as a way to improve health among other benefits. I like creating pl Before I start this review, I should find it appropriate to say I'm a self proclaimed music nut. :) I listen to anything from Soul to Alternative, Progressive Metal to J-Pop and K-Pop, and Jazz to Classical among many other types. My tastes are varied, but they remain dynamic and define who I am as a person. When coming across "Your Playlist Can Change Your Life" - the idea behind the work seemed really fascinating - using music as a way to improve health among other benefits. I like creating playlists to evoke certain moods and emotions for my writing pursuits, but I never really conciously thought about making specific playlists for the direct health benefit. I decided to pick it up and see what the authors of the work had to say about the science and construction of these types of playlists. It's an interesting read, for sure, though I imagine some people who pick it up may find it common sense if they've been exposed to this kind of literature in any capacity. Taking into consideration the way our brains work with certain songs, considering the different elements of music, the wave type (alpha, beta, theta, and delta) and the rate (BPM) it's measured, these pieces are going to affect the way we feel. When we listen to music that's soothing - it calms us, if we listen to music that's bound to get our heart racing, that's the response you'll get. The science behind these ideals is based good bit about the parts of the brain and how they're affected based on what we hear. This book expounds on the practice of using music to not only induce certain states of mind, but also using music in certain activities and determining what's appropriate to your emotional needs. I personally meditate with music, I exercise with music, I do a lot of things with it playing in the background. And I've done these things without necessarily thinking about the underlying principles behind it. This book expanded upon those principles and gave me some points of interest to think about. It provides food for thought, and I would be remiss to say that it didn't give me some aspects to think about in crafting my own playlists more carefully. The book is structured with a certain aspect covered in each chapter, followed by an interactive activity the reader can try in constructing their playlist. It's user/beginner friendly, particularly for those who don't normally work with playlists. I did see a few errors in my ARC of the work (i.e. "Billy Jean" vs. "Billie Jean" by Michael Jackson), but my hope is that those will be corrected before the work is released. I like the fact that the book encourages changing up your playlists or crafting different ones to listen to from time to time, because variety is important and the effect of diluting a song and the effect it will have on you is a reality. The notes on visualization and attaching imagery with a song is also something I appreciated. If I could be critical about this work - I would say that there are points when the book repeats itself in its formulaic steps and states the obvious at times (of course you're going to choose songs that you like - that's kind of a given!). It also doesn't really go into the kind of depth that I think someone of a scientific mind or music affictionado would appreciate, and I would've liked to have seen more case studies/personal accounts of what some people said their personal playlists entailed, rather than just having kind of a generic set of playlists listed without attachment inside the book. Those are probably the major reasons why this book didn't get a higher star count from me. Still, I enjoyed reading this for what it offered. As a final note on this review, I'll share a playlist of my own. 10 songs, "rose" themed, and terribly random, but they rank among my favorites. Rose's "Rose-Themed" Playlist (no particular order): 1. "Roses" by Poets of the Fall 2. "Blood and Roses" by The Smithereens 3. "Rose" by A Perfect Circle 4. "Kiss from a Rose" by Seal 5. "Bokura Barairo no Hibi" (Our Rose-colored Days) by Chihiro Onitsuka 6. "Rose" by Anna Tsuchiya 7. "Rose Red" by Emilie Autumn 8. "Desert Rose" by Eric Johnson 9. "Roses of May" by Nobuo Uematsu (from the Final Fantasy IX OST) 10. "Honeysuckle Rose" by Thelonious Monk Overall score: 3/5 Note: I received this as an ARC from NetGalley, from the publisher Sourcebooks.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Deborah

    I like the idea. The research seems sound. I didn't like the beginning very much. I had to skip around to get interested in the book. At the beginning it sounded like way too much trouble and the thought of listening to the same songs over and over didn't sound appealing to me. Some sections were very technical, I think sidebars could have been used for those details. I think it would have been better to start with the chapter about changing your mood. That's easier to understand. I think longer I like the idea. The research seems sound. I didn't like the beginning very much. I had to skip around to get interested in the book. At the beginning it sounded like way too much trouble and the thought of listening to the same songs over and over didn't sound appealing to me. Some sections were very technical, I think sidebars could have been used for those details. I think it would have been better to start with the chapter about changing your mood. That's easier to understand. I think longer playlists with more songs would be easier to start with. They do eventually explain that you should vary the songs. I was disappointed that the insomnia advice was buried in chapter 10 and only suggested BMT (it's a therapy they are trying to sell and a website they are promoting) tracks. BMT was mentioned other places, but was really only explained and promoted in one chapter. Using their other methods, I could see a calming playlist being used before bed and whenever you can't sleep. I didn't like that there were three people speaking with one voice. I would have preferred knowing which POV I was reading. I do think it contains good information, but it might have been better for someone else to write the book based on their research. I won this through the goodreads first-reads program. It was an uncorrected advance copy.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Sue

    Read this and took notes in around an hour and a half at the library today. A lot of things resonated with my experience as a musician and a person who has always loved music, but it was interesting to see that there is science behind your favorite music affecting you. Looking forward to making my own playlists and exploring music purposely in the near future.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Nathan Albright

    I am no stranger either to thinking about, reading about, or practicing music therapy in my own life [1].  As a person with a high degree of anxiety in my own personal life, there is much that I find necessary to do in order to keep myself on an even keel.  This book is one that gives some thoughtful advice and even if the choice of music the book gives is not particularly enjoyable to me for one reason or another, and even if the authors of the book are clearly guilty of overselling their advic I am no stranger either to thinking about, reading about, or practicing music therapy in my own life [1].  As a person with a high degree of anxiety in my own personal life, there is much that I find necessary to do in order to keep myself on an even keel.  This book is one that gives some thoughtful advice and even if the choice of music the book gives is not particularly enjoyable to me for one reason or another, and even if the authors of the book are clearly guilty of overselling their advice, which is a common issue, there is still much of value here.  You simply have to detract the overselling rhetoric to come to a more reasonable judgment of the worth of music and to insert your own music tastes instead of the alternatively too hipster and too overplayed songs chosen by the authors as representative samples in order to find worth.  Since that isn't too much work to manage, this is still a decent and worthwhile book to read for those who want to wire their brain to be more effective by using music, or who may already do such things and not know the science behind it. When the title of the book states that changing one's playlist can do ten things for the brain, they are exaggerating slightly, as there is a great deal of overlap among the things that music can do for the brain, but even so, music can do a lot.  For example, the authors begin by talking about how music can be used to make one's mind flow, and then how it can be used to keep the mind flowing.  Then the authors discuss how to use music to alleviate anxiety and after that to increase one's alertness, and then how to feel happier.  The authors then talk about how music can organize one's brain and then sharpen one's memory, before closing the book with discussions on how one can music to improve one's mood, live creatively, and use the brain's own music.  It is towards the end of the book, particularly in the last chapter, where one realizes that the authors have a financial motive in urging the reader to turn their own brain waves into music at various centers for the profit of the authors.  And though this leaves a sour taste in the mouth of this reader, at least it makes the agenda of the authors plain enough and open enough. In about 200 pages, much of which is filled with somewhat repetitive lists of songs that serve as placeholders for how one can use music to program the mind.  Yet the authors discuss it as a complicated task that requires a certain amount of sensitivity to do well.  Songs that work for driving to work peacefully do not always work well for driving home or trying to prepare for a stressful conversation or recovering from an unpleasant life event.  Likewise, songs that remind one of a partner can be good in lowering irritation but bad if you and the partner break up.  The authors show a great deal of sensitivity and encourage the reader to do the same in working out the complexities of how to program the brain, but supposing someone is self-aware and fond of music, there is probably much in here that the reader would already know before reading the book.  Even so, this is the sort of book that belongs among the better side of self-help books, because even if the authors have a clear agenda of supporting the sale of brain waves packaged as music, at least the authors don't have some sort of Eastern religious agenda as is so common in books of this kind. [1] See, for example: https://edgeinducedcohesion.blog/2012... https://edgeinducedcohesion.blog/2017... https://edgeinducedcohesion.blog/2016... https://edgeinducedcohesion.blog/2016... https://edgeinducedcohesion.blog/2012...

  5. 4 out of 5

    Anne

    I really enjoyed this book. It was a quick, interesting read especially for someone who enjoys music but is not a musician. While some of the information may seem obvious, too often music is just backround noise. This book made me think about really listening to music and connecting it with emotions. I am certain that I will place more attention on the music and lyrics. I found the sections on running and music particularly interesting, and will apply this to my own running. The playlists made m I really enjoyed this book. It was a quick, interesting read especially for someone who enjoys music but is not a musician. While some of the information may seem obvious, too often music is just backround noise. This book made me think about really listening to music and connecting it with emotions. I am certain that I will place more attention on the music and lyrics. I found the sections on running and music particularly interesting, and will apply this to my own running. The playlists made me think of songs I have forgotten and gave me impetus to mix up my own playlist a bit. The book was a good starting off point to delve more into how music influences our lives. The subject matter was engaging and spurred my curiosity to expand my knowledge of music, listen to various types of music, find more books by these authors, and listen actively and mindfully. For those reasons, I rate this book four stars. Some things that I will look into/listen to after reading the book include: Mozart's Sonata for 2 pianos in D major for focus For relaxation, piano instrumental version of Utada Hikaru's First Love Mozart reduce anxiety, balance mind, improve performance

  6. 4 out of 5

    Mary Beth Revesz

    For a music nut like me, this book had so many interesting ideas for how to craft playlists for optimum living. I am always making playlists and creating mixtapes, but I never thought how using certain songs could help me to be organized or improve my memory.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Martha

    Interesting material. I would have liked the book better if it had been aimed at a scholarly audience, delving more into the research behind the techniques. As it is, it reads more like a self-help book for a popular audience. Also, some of the advice in the different chapters seems repetitive.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Brit McGinnis

    A perfectly fine book about brain waves and how action affects them. **Listen to a longer review (with a few more swears) on my podcast, You're Not Helping! ***Now available on iTunes and Stitcher. ****Listen here --> http://bit.ly/NotHelpingPod A perfectly fine book about brain waves and how action affects them. **Listen to a longer review (with a few more swears) on my podcast, You're Not Helping! ***Now available on iTunes and Stitcher. ****Listen here --> http://bit.ly/NotHelpingPod

  9. 5 out of 5

    Kimberly Tierney

    I love the idea but I just couldn’t get into the book.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Margy Peterson

    I intend to return to this for other purposes. but the approach lacks some of the spiritual magic which makes music touch the deeper places in the heart.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Rachel

    I wasn't sure what to expect when I began reading this book, and to be perfectly honest I'm not sure what I think now that I've finished the book. I'm very interested in the type of pop psychology theories that show you how to change your life based on routines or life hacks, but this is something on a different plane entirely. I should probably state up front that I'm not particularly a huge music fan. I like music just fine, but I would compare myself to a casual wine drinker, and to the likely I wasn't sure what to expect when I began reading this book, and to be perfectly honest I'm not sure what I think now that I've finished the book. I'm very interested in the type of pop psychology theories that show you how to change your life based on routines or life hacks, but this is something on a different plane entirely. I should probably state up front that I'm not particularly a huge music fan. I like music just fine, but I would compare myself to a casual wine drinker, and to the likely audience for this book being oenophiles. I can enjoy my malbec or merlot without needing to know where it came from or what makes it taste good, and I can tap my fingers along to the radio without caring about the beats per minute or the effect on my brain activity pattern. Still, I'm aware of the power of music. The playlists my yoga teacher puts together get me focused, push me through the hard parts, help center me when my mind wants to wander, and give me a wonderful uplifting feeling at the end of class. During a rough breakup several years ago, I noticed that the only time my mind calmed and I felt happy were during dance classes, particularly during choreographies with upbeat melodies and fast beats. The blend of music and movement for me is a very powerful one, but I'm not inclined to take it much further than that. I don't collect music and rarely care who sings a song or what the lyrics actually are, so the exercises in the book seemed really overwhelming to me (more on that in a minute). The main thesis of this book is the fact that the plasticity of your brain allows you to use music as a trigger to increase your happy moods, decrease your bad moods, enhance concentration and otherwise affect anything you do that requires brainpower - in other words, pretty much everything. The book intends to help you in determining what music allows you to develop and sustain the best pattern for your brain waves, and to create playlists for various purposes to achieve those goals. However. Some of the claims made by the authors make me very wary. For example,"Many people have reported that they have been able to reduce and even completely eliminate their need for sleep and antianexiety medication as a result of [brain music therapy]" is, to me, a very concerning sentence in the middle of a more concerning chapter about how, by spending time arranging playlists and listening to music, you can disregard what other mental health experts treat as depression, self-harm/mutilation, anger, and other problems generally addressed by talk therapy and/or medication. I'm sure the well-educated authors didn't intend for the advice in this book to be taken in lieu of a doctor's advice (I HOPE), but they sure don't say that in the text. (And seriously - music replacing the need for sleep? No, thanks.) Back to the exercises. Each chapter includes sample playlists and exercises to help you develop your own playlist of music that works for you. They're clear that music that you personally like makes the best impact on you, so their suggestions are eclectic and inclusive. However, the exercises require a lot of time spent finding music, organizing it, continually updating it, and spending focused time listening to it (practicing, effectively) in order to create the desired associations in your brain. "But you can't expect to just turn on your CD and see immediate results as if you were popping a pill. To best train your brain, you need to listen to the files regularly over a period of several weeks," they note. It winds up being serious time, on the order of 15 minutes minimum listening time per day per playlist, plus requires you to regularly listen again during times of stress - so, at work or in other settings where it's not likely to be appropriate or manageable. Meditation and breathing exercises seem to me to be just as useful and much more unobtrusive. However, I don't think I'm upset at the lack of a "quick fix" - the book mostly seems to be a solution to a problem I'm not actually sure I have. Since starting the book, I at least began to pay a little more attention to the music that I already listen to (in the car, in a grocery store, in the background) but I can't say I'm willing to dive in and spend time in the rabbit hole of iTunes trying to come up with something that will change my life - a life, incidentally, which seems easily managed without the help of a playlist. Verdict: interesting reading, but I find the presentation both too simple and too complicated at the same time.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Thomas

    Quite useful, but repetitive, and necessarily dated. Fairly soft science backing up the practice of listening to music in order to moderate consciousness. The practice has been a part of human existence for many thousands of years. Vibratory effects of sound have been well known, primarily in religious contexts. For example, Vedic tradition of mantra use for specific physiological effects. Listening to my iPod while backpacking, bicycling, and walking has clearly resulted in elevated energy, inc Quite useful, but repetitive, and necessarily dated. Fairly soft science backing up the practice of listening to music in order to moderate consciousness. The practice has been a part of human existence for many thousands of years. Vibratory effects of sound have been well known, primarily in religious contexts. For example, Vedic tradition of mantra use for specific physiological effects. Listening to my iPod while backpacking, bicycling, and walking has clearly resulted in elevated energy, increased happiness, surprising releases of emotion ( like crying), and help from boredom. On my 2,700 mile Pacific Crest Trail, I used my iPod sparingly, due to battery life. It was engaged in late afternoons, when I was fatigued after 20+ miles, and had the effect of increasing my flagging pace. It is also effective on uphill climbs. In some instances the perceived effect was equivalent to the energy increase from eating a 200 calorie energy or candy bar. Recent comments in Outside magazine support my experience.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Alicia

    If the structure of the book was reorganized I think I could have enjoyed the book more than I did. I felt like after a brief introduction to a new concept that there was repetition within each chapter and a case of deja vu. The scientific premise of using music to manipulate memory, organize, calm, intensify (and more) activities is clear cut and motivational to begin to think about your musical preferences, the 'music of your life' and memories associated with sounds as well as rhythm, harmony If the structure of the book was reorganized I think I could have enjoyed the book more than I did. I felt like after a brief introduction to a new concept that there was repetition within each chapter and a case of deja vu. The scientific premise of using music to manipulate memory, organize, calm, intensify (and more) activities is clear cut and motivational to begin to think about your musical preferences, the 'music of your life' and memories associated with sounds as well as rhythm, harmony, etc. all explained. The simple campfire crackles or moving water as a demonstration of memory and the power of sound reminded me in part of one of my favorite nonfiction titles A Natural History of the Senses. Informative read but not as engaging as it could have been in mixing science with practicality.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Renee Brooks

    (F.Y.I.)I am going to be kinda harsh in this review. Well...this book was repetitive to say the least. I guess I did pull some helpful tips from the whole book but I was just not feeling it at all. The author had their heart in the right place but at the end of each chapter, you receive the same regurgitated material from all the chapters prior. The most interesting parts about this book were; the mentioning of BPM Music Files (music your brain makes via brain waves) and the fact that by using m (F.Y.I.)I am going to be kinda harsh in this review. Well...this book was repetitive to say the least. I guess I did pull some helpful tips from the whole book but I was just not feeling it at all. The author had their heart in the right place but at the end of each chapter, you receive the same regurgitated material from all the chapters prior. The most interesting parts about this book were; the mentioning of BPM Music Files (music your brain makes via brain waves) and the fact that by using music while you are trying to remember something will actually help the memory stick longer and remember it quicker. I guess if you didn't have anything better to do you could read this book...or you can just go to the last bullet point listing near the end of the book. The information there is the quickest summary you've ever seen and It will be just like you read the entire book...

  15. 4 out of 5

    Farrah

    Interesting read about how music can change the way the brain works in different situations. I found the book to contain things I already knew but also informative on the science front and helpful in determining what songs or sounds would help me have a more peaceful or motivating and focused mind. I do think I would have liked it better if the layout of the chapters and writing style were more “entertaining” even though I learned a couple things. Overall though I found it to be OK. If you’re lo Interesting read about how music can change the way the brain works in different situations. I found the book to contain things I already knew but also informative on the science front and helpful in determining what songs or sounds would help me have a more peaceful or motivating and focused mind. I do think I would have liked it better if the layout of the chapters and writing style were more “entertaining” even though I learned a couple things. Overall though I found it to be OK. If you’re looking for ways to make music fit better into your life, need a new way to get through situations using music memory techniques or learn how to get more into the music, you might find this to be an interesting read.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Sarah Hannah

    I'm trying to remember why I was so excited to read this, because it really is far from riveting. Also, the problem with any book like this is that it's instantly dated (10,000 Maniacs) and also cannot offer any real suggestions on what to put on a playlist because that's so personal. That said, it does actually say some interesting things about neuroscience, brain music therapy, how BPM can affect your mood, and other cool things that, even though they don't provide direct inspiration as to the I'm trying to remember why I was so excited to read this, because it really is far from riveting. Also, the problem with any book like this is that it's instantly dated (10,000 Maniacs) and also cannot offer any real suggestions on what to put on a playlist because that's so personal. That said, it does actually say some interesting things about neuroscience, brain music therapy, how BPM can affect your mood, and other cool things that, even though they don't provide direct inspiration as to the content of your playlist, speak to the necessity for having a few on your iPod. But also, those interesting things could have been said in like half the number of pages, because that's how often these people used extraneous words or repeated themselves.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Andrea

    Interesting book offering the science behind the interaction between music and the listener's mind. Music is my madeleine, with scenes from my past evoked in Proustian detail by songs and symphonic passages, but I hadn't thought of using music as a tool. Interspersed with the scientific information are anecdotes from the three authors and sample playlists that can be used to enhance or improve a variety of situations, from a bad mood to a work deadline (which in my case usually go together). Usi Interesting book offering the science behind the interaction between music and the listener's mind. Music is my madeleine, with scenes from my past evoked in Proustian detail by songs and symphonic passages, but I hadn't thought of using music as a tool. Interspersed with the scientific information are anecdotes from the three authors and sample playlists that can be used to enhance or improve a variety of situations, from a bad mood to a work deadline (which in my case usually go together). Using the guidelines in this book, it's possible to orchestrate a fulfilling day by choosing music that will ease you into the morning -- or give it a kick-start, depending -- and keep you motivated till the end of the day.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Sumit Sabnis

    I believed music is just entertainment , this book made me rethink . Music is medicine a brain controlling, mood altering tool process the author.Also suggests we use song playlists for each routine activities for the day like , morning, drive to work ,at work , night time etc. This whole idea sounded so cool to me. I decided to put it to practice , and am happy by the results. Towards the end however it gets too specific on the author's research in to own brain music which I could not experimen I believed music is just entertainment , this book made me rethink . Music is medicine a brain controlling, mood altering tool process the author.Also suggests we use song playlists for each routine activities for the day like , morning, drive to work ,at work , night time etc. This whole idea sounded so cool to me. I decided to put it to practice , and am happy by the results. Towards the end however it gets too specific on the author's research in to own brain music which I could not experiment with , as I think it's not available in India. Over all it was a must read for music pariah like me.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Alyssa Greatbanks

    I understand they would like to get you to understand the methods well. But I do think that at times, they explained things a little too much for the average person. Other than that though, it was a pretty good book. I've already made a playlist using their methods, and I hope to see improvements soon. And the BMT procedure they explained sounded pretty neat. I am thinking of doing that one of these days when it gets a little cheaper. I recieved this book through the GoodReads First Reads Giveaway. I understand they would like to get you to understand the methods well. But I do think that at times, they explained things a little too much for the average person. Other than that though, it was a pretty good book. I've already made a playlist using their methods, and I hope to see improvements soon. And the BMT procedure they explained sounded pretty neat. I am thinking of doing that one of these days when it gets a little cheaper. I recieved this book through the GoodReads First Reads Giveaway. This has not affected my review in any way.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Lori

    Maybe I didn't really pay enough attention to the description on the back cover...or maybe I thought this would be less self-helpy and more science-y. Either way, what I thought I'd be reading was a look into how people's brains are wired different ways to respond to different music...for example, what makes one person able to concentrate better while listening to Vivaldi and another listening to Metallica? That's not what this was, really. There was some of that, but then exercises at the end o Maybe I didn't really pay enough attention to the description on the back cover...or maybe I thought this would be less self-helpy and more science-y. Either way, what I thought I'd be reading was a look into how people's brains are wired different ways to respond to different music...for example, what makes one person able to concentrate better while listening to Vivaldi and another listening to Metallica? That's not what this was, really. There was some of that, but then exercises at the end of each chapter and sample playlists. Eh. Made it through maybe 2 chapters.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Kristie

    Wow, this book is best suited for people who are completely out of touch with themselves, or humanity. Most people know how music effects them, or if they don't know, they subconciously utilize all of the information provided in this book. It's so repetitive too. You use the same technique whether you want to feel calm, alert, happy, or creative. The only thing that changes is the music, duh. The only thing I found interesting about this book was the little blurb about turning your brain waves i Wow, this book is best suited for people who are completely out of touch with themselves, or humanity. Most people know how music effects them, or if they don't know, they subconciously utilize all of the information provided in this book. It's so repetitive too. You use the same technique whether you want to feel calm, alert, happy, or creative. The only thing that changes is the music, duh. The only thing I found interesting about this book was the little blurb about turning your brain waves into music, now that is cool.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Amy J

    We all know how music makes us feel, how it stimulates the thought process, how it calms those nerves. We all know how amazing it is to hear your favorite song, how you automatically turn it up and how good you feel after having heard it. If you are a music lover this book is telling you things you already know deep down. It just takes it a step or two further and teaches you to hone the skills you need to allow music to work in beneficial ways for you. Not that music wasn't already working for We all know how music makes us feel, how it stimulates the thought process, how it calms those nerves. We all know how amazing it is to hear your favorite song, how you automatically turn it up and how good you feel after having heard it. If you are a music lover this book is telling you things you already know deep down. It just takes it a step or two further and teaches you to hone the skills you need to allow music to work in beneficial ways for you. Not that music wasn't already working for you, this just allows you to ramp it up.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Chris Spaigjht

    It's not that the advice is bad or wrong, it's actually pretty interesting and helpful. For the first chapter. Unfortunately, there's not a true variance in application, even tough the chapters imply so. Here's the format: describe an emotion or mental state, give examples of how playlists can change or enhance your mood, repeat same directions on making a playlist that have appeared in all previous chapters.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Rachel Morley

    Some interesting concepts but nothing terribly earth shattering or anything that's not common sense. Music is such a huge part of my life, moods, etc.... that I did appreciate looking a bit more deeply at the psychological effects of music, but really, the only thing that really stuck with me from the book were the quotes at the beginning of each chapter.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Kristi Hanson

    Lots of common sense stuff, but gave me information on how to customize my playlists a little better. I already construct my playlists to match the mood I may be in, but it helps to think about it a little differently.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Karen

    This would have been better served as a blogpost. Using your playlists to regulate your mood is an interesting idea though. There was no mention as to what might be differences between music-lovers only & practicing musicians. Also lots of repetition since they had to pad it out. This would have been better served as a blogpost. Using your playlists to regulate your mood is an interesting idea though. There was no mention as to what might be differences between music-lovers only & practicing musicians. Also lots of repetition since they had to pad it out.

  27. 4 out of 5

    James Traxler

    Waste of time. I love music. More than anything. And I was hoping for some tips on how I could use it to help me improve things in my life. I didn't get much from this book on that. There's a lot of talk but nothing I found enlightening or useful. I've never given a 1-star rating before.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Rosa

    Why are all my playlists from my past? Since I had kids I don't listen to music.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Taleisin (Tales of a Bookwyrm)

    I always knew that music could affect my mood and even change the course of my day. It was neat to hear the scientific evidence. This book had me fiddling around with my playlists.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Valerie, Queen

    Meh. Nothing too surprising. Make sure the music I put on my playlist is music I like? No way!

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