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The Complete Works of Charles Dickens

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* ALL 15 Novels and ALL illustrated with the original Victorian images * Each text is annotated with concise introductions, giving valuable contextual information * each novel and story collection has its own contents table * Special Bonus text of Henry Morford’s classic continuation of Edwin Drood – finish the novel at last! IMPROVED text * all of the Christmas stories and no * ALL 15 Novels and ALL illustrated with the original Victorian images * Each text is annotated with concise introductions, giving valuable contextual information * each novel and story collection has its own contents table * Special Bonus text of Henry Morford’s classic continuation of Edwin Drood – finish the novel at last! IMPROVED text * all of the Christmas stories and novellas with their original artwork * the complete poetry, plays, letters and speeches * ALL of the collaborative works with other authors – even the very rare ones * beautifully illustrated with hundreds of Dickensian images * rare images of how the monthly serials first appeared, giving your Kindle a taste of the original texts * includes bonus Pickwickiana text – Montcrieff’s drama SAM WELLER, giving a taste of the Victorian craze – available nowhere else as a digital book * includes John Forster's biography of Dickens; explore the great writer's amazing life! * MEMOIRS OF JOSEPH GRIMALDI by Thomas Egerton Wilks, which Dickens edited in his early career - first time in digital print. * Charles Barnett’s 1838 dramatic adaptation of OLIVER TWIST, first time in digital print * no less than FIVE more biographies, including Mamie Dickens’ memoir MY FATHER AS I RECALL HIM * a special criticism section of 14 texts, with essays by writers such as G.K. Chesterton, Andrew Lang and Henry James, examining Dickens’ contribution to literature * includes an Adaptations section, featuring Hallie Erminie Rives’ TALES FROM DICKENS * UPDATED with improved spellings, introductions and images * this truly is the Dickensian’s perfect choice! This is the ULTIMATE edition of Dickens’ works, with every published novel, short story, novella, play, poem, letter, speech and article – fully illustrated – and featuring a treasure trove of bonus material. Contents: A DINNER AT POPLAR WALK The Novels THE POSTHUMOUS PAPERS OF THE PICKWICK CLUB OLIVER TWIST THE LIFE AND ADVENTURES OF NICHOLAS NICKLEBY THE OLD CURIOSITY SHOP BARNABY RUDGE THE LIFE AND ADVENTURES OF MARTIN CHUZZLEWIT DOMBEY AND SON DAVID COPPERFIELD BLEAK HOUSE HARD TIMES LITTLE DORRIT A TALE OF TWO CITIES GREAT EXPECTATIONS OUR MUTUAL FRIEND THE MYSTERY OF EDWIN DROOD JOHN JASPER'S SECRET by Henry Morford The Christmas Novellas A CHRISTMAS CAROL THE CHIMES THE CRICKET ON THE HEARTH THE BATTLE OF LIFE THE HAUNTED MAN AND THE GHOST’S BARGAIN The Short Stories LIST OF THE COMPLETE SHORT STORIES The Short Story Collections SKETCHES BY BOZ MASTER HUMPHREY'S CLOCK REPRINTED PIECES The Collaborative Works THE SEVEN POOR TRAVELLERS THE HOLLY-TREE NO THOROUGHFARE MEMOIRS OF JOSEPH GRIMALDI by Thomas Egerton Wilks And many more The Plays All the plays and SAM WELLER by W.T Moncrieff OLIVER TWIST by Charles Zachary Barnett The Poetry LIST OF THE POETRY The Non-Fiction AMERICAN NOTES MISCELLANEOUS PAPERS And many more The Adaptations TALES FROM DICKENS by Hallie Erminie Rives The Criticism APPRECIATIONS AND CRITICISMS OF THE WORKS OF CHARLES DICKENS by G. K.


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* ALL 15 Novels and ALL illustrated with the original Victorian images * Each text is annotated with concise introductions, giving valuable contextual information * each novel and story collection has its own contents table * Special Bonus text of Henry Morford’s classic continuation of Edwin Drood – finish the novel at last! IMPROVED text * all of the Christmas stories and no * ALL 15 Novels and ALL illustrated with the original Victorian images * Each text is annotated with concise introductions, giving valuable contextual information * each novel and story collection has its own contents table * Special Bonus text of Henry Morford’s classic continuation of Edwin Drood – finish the novel at last! IMPROVED text * all of the Christmas stories and novellas with their original artwork * the complete poetry, plays, letters and speeches * ALL of the collaborative works with other authors – even the very rare ones * beautifully illustrated with hundreds of Dickensian images * rare images of how the monthly serials first appeared, giving your Kindle a taste of the original texts * includes bonus Pickwickiana text – Montcrieff’s drama SAM WELLER, giving a taste of the Victorian craze – available nowhere else as a digital book * includes John Forster's biography of Dickens; explore the great writer's amazing life! * MEMOIRS OF JOSEPH GRIMALDI by Thomas Egerton Wilks, which Dickens edited in his early career - first time in digital print. * Charles Barnett’s 1838 dramatic adaptation of OLIVER TWIST, first time in digital print * no less than FIVE more biographies, including Mamie Dickens’ memoir MY FATHER AS I RECALL HIM * a special criticism section of 14 texts, with essays by writers such as G.K. Chesterton, Andrew Lang and Henry James, examining Dickens’ contribution to literature * includes an Adaptations section, featuring Hallie Erminie Rives’ TALES FROM DICKENS * UPDATED with improved spellings, introductions and images * this truly is the Dickensian’s perfect choice! This is the ULTIMATE edition of Dickens’ works, with every published novel, short story, novella, play, poem, letter, speech and article – fully illustrated – and featuring a treasure trove of bonus material. Contents: A DINNER AT POPLAR WALK The Novels THE POSTHUMOUS PAPERS OF THE PICKWICK CLUB OLIVER TWIST THE LIFE AND ADVENTURES OF NICHOLAS NICKLEBY THE OLD CURIOSITY SHOP BARNABY RUDGE THE LIFE AND ADVENTURES OF MARTIN CHUZZLEWIT DOMBEY AND SON DAVID COPPERFIELD BLEAK HOUSE HARD TIMES LITTLE DORRIT A TALE OF TWO CITIES GREAT EXPECTATIONS OUR MUTUAL FRIEND THE MYSTERY OF EDWIN DROOD JOHN JASPER'S SECRET by Henry Morford The Christmas Novellas A CHRISTMAS CAROL THE CHIMES THE CRICKET ON THE HEARTH THE BATTLE OF LIFE THE HAUNTED MAN AND THE GHOST’S BARGAIN The Short Stories LIST OF THE COMPLETE SHORT STORIES The Short Story Collections SKETCHES BY BOZ MASTER HUMPHREY'S CLOCK REPRINTED PIECES The Collaborative Works THE SEVEN POOR TRAVELLERS THE HOLLY-TREE NO THOROUGHFARE MEMOIRS OF JOSEPH GRIMALDI by Thomas Egerton Wilks And many more The Plays All the plays and SAM WELLER by W.T Moncrieff OLIVER TWIST by Charles Zachary Barnett The Poetry LIST OF THE POETRY The Non-Fiction AMERICAN NOTES MISCELLANEOUS PAPERS And many more The Adaptations TALES FROM DICKENS by Hallie Erminie Rives The Criticism APPRECIATIONS AND CRITICISMS OF THE WORKS OF CHARLES DICKENS by G. K.

30 review for The Complete Works of Charles Dickens

  1. 4 out of 5

    CadyCan

    Started 3 Jan 2012 with American Notes for General Circulation (listed this separately by mistake) finished on 9 Feb 2012 see separate listing for review. Started Barnaby Rudge 9 Feb 2012 Finished 22 March 2012 see separate listing for review Started Battle of Life 22 March 2012 Finished 26 March 2012 see separate listing for review Bleak House is the next book in the Complete Works, I have read it before but started it again 27 March 2012 Finished 6 June 2012 Started A Budget of Christmas Tales fir Started 3 Jan 2012 with American Notes for General Circulation (listed this separately by mistake) finished on 9 Feb 2012 see separate listing for review. Started Barnaby Rudge 9 Feb 2012 Finished 22 March 2012 see separate listing for review Started Battle of Life 22 March 2012 Finished 26 March 2012 see separate listing for review Bleak House is the next book in the Complete Works, I have read it before but started it again 27 March 2012 Finished 6 June 2012 Started A Budget of Christmas Tales first with A Christmas Carol 8 June 2012 but got bored with the theme seeing as its no where near Christmas so will revisit in December Skipped Contributions to "All the Year Round" as well as is a number of short stories I couldn't get into. Started The Cricket on the Hearth in July and finished it a couple of weeks later before the end of the month see separate listing for review Started David Copperfield 1 August 2012 Finished some time in August Read Doctor Marigold shortly after Read Dombey and Son, a seemingly never ending story during Sept, Oct & finally finishing on 6 Nov 2012 Started George Silverman's explanation 13 December 2012 Finished 14 Dec 2012 (short story) Started Going into Society 16 Dec 2012 Finished 20 Dec 2012 (short story) Started Great Expectations 26 Dec 2012 Finished 20 Jan 2013. This is the second time I've read this. The first time was at school. See separate listing for review Started Hard Times 3 February 2013 Finished 16 February 2013. See separate listing for review Started The Haunted Man and the Ghost's Bargain 16 February 2013 Finished a month or so later & then reread December 2013 in a couple of days while away cos couldn't remember story to do review. See separate listing for review Started Holiday Romance 21 December 2013 Finished 23 December 2013. See separate listing for review Started The Holly-Tree 23 December 2013. See separate listing for review Started Hunted Down-17 February 2014 Finished 19 February 2014. See separate listing for review Started The Lamplighter - 20 February 2014 Finished 21 February 2014. See separate listing for review Started Lazy Tour of Two Idle Apprentices - started 22 February Finished 25 February. See separate listing for review Paused at location 110057 of 294502 at the start of Letters of Charles Dickens, Vol 1: 1833-1856 and skipped ahead to: The Old Curiosity Shop (cos Jean's reading it at mo) - 21 Aug 2015 Finished on ? Went back to first book after Letters of Charles Dickens which is Started Life and Adventures of Martin Chuzzlewit: Started 23 Oct 2017 Finished on tbc

  2. 4 out of 5

    Jeanne

    reading it again on my Kindle this time - loving it

  3. 5 out of 5

    Derek Davis

    This is a sort of Dickens potpourri, covering three of his novels that I've read in chronological succession, so for those who don't like Dickens (and I know who you are!), just shoo. I do like Dickens, but less for his actual tales, which I admit languish along the way more often than not, than for his humor, detail, and caring for humanity. I won't bother dropping in examples of his humor, for it niggles and wanders, dissecting the overbearing with snipes at their foibles, cuddling the worthwh This is a sort of Dickens potpourri, covering three of his novels that I've read in chronological succession, so for those who don't like Dickens (and I know who you are!), just shoo. I do like Dickens, but less for his actual tales, which I admit languish along the way more often than not, than for his humor, detail, and caring for humanity. I won't bother dropping in examples of his humor, for it niggles and wanders, dissecting the overbearing with snipes at their foibles, cuddling the worthwhile under coverlets of love. I've read long paragraphs of his describing a simple scene and been left near suffocating with laughter You get the idea. Those paragraphs – and others packed with seriousness – live on detail, the bits and pieces of what makes us human, for good or bad, and how those pieces not only define but direct us in our actions. That may sound simple or everyday, but Dickens wanders down into the deepest levels of the immediate to find the caste-off scraps that are, so often, more important than the looming furniture. Dickens was a reporter – in the general and in the specific sense of being a writer (and righter) of human wrongs. The characters he extols are the downtrodden, the victims of the inequities that come form being alive in a complicated, confused, ill-balanced and often uncaring world. His villains are damn-your-soul sons of bitches that you wait to see devoured by their own evil (which you do get to see!). All that sounds a bit heavy-handed, doesn't it? 'Tis, but life for so many of us (as the current global situation underscores) is just that – heavy-handed, unsympathetic and bereft of worth. So those are the pillars upon which I balance my respect for Dickens. But I'm not trying to knight him simply for carrying a lance. There are many times when he seems to be wearing his armor backwards or at least askew Nicholas Nickleby ***** Not perfect by any means, but strong, stout, direct and unsparing. Nicholas, his mother and his sister Kate are left adrift following the death of his father (you'd be hard-pressed to find a family in 19th-century British novels with both parents alive and functioning). They are overseen, to their disservice, by venal Uncle Ralph, who holds the reins to the family fortune, what's left of it. Nicholas takes an instructor's position in a Yorkshire school which is the epitome of malevolent education. He leaves after beating the crap out of the vicious schoolmaster (Wackford Squeers – another of Dickens' marvelously named villains), then moving the family to London to become a private secretary, constantly undercut by Ralph, who is busy trying, with his equally vile associates, to gain control of a young heiress's fortune. The action unfolds at the pace it should, when it should. Both Nicholas and Kate seemed destined to have their romantic choices denied them, but of course they win their loves, and Uncle Ralph receives vengeance at his own hand. The broad plot, then, is a standard thing, but not so the handling of feelings and character. Dickens retains some pity even for the uncle who, after all, isn't responsible for his birth as a terrible human being – though Dickens holds nothing back in his verbal evisceration of Sir Mulberry Hawk, a dissolute playboy without the least smidgeon of decency. The Old Curiosity Shop *** The outlook here I find too glaringly black and white. It's also confusing that Nell, the central character, is described in her actions as though she's 9 or 10, but is said to be roughly 14. And her determination to lead her failing grandfather on an interminable walk from London into the countryside is downright absurd. But again, Dickens brings such humanity throughout that I can forgive much of this, especially in chapters such as Nell in a churchyard, talking to the sexton – a brilliant study of the joys of life and transience; of the continuation of good and decency no matter what. No need to badger the plot here, which is stark and unrelenting, but in a sense barely matters. But I found Nell's death near the end an unmotivated tear-jerking cheat that adds nothing; Dickens' apologia for death rings hollow. Barnaby Rudge *** What an oddly disjointed and bumbling mess. There's indication that Dickens intended this to be his first novel, but it was published only when, much later, he had established his own weekly, "Master Humphrey's Clock," as a depository for this and similar pieces--including The Old Curiosity Shop (the magazine lasted a year). To me, it reads like two short novels slapped together with verbal Gorilla Glue. The parts don't line up, the plots misalign or disappear, then reappear when you've forgotten what came earlier. The first half concentrates on the life flowing into, out of and around the Maypole Tavern; the animosity between the Chester and Haredale families; and a murder 20 years back. It's remarkably, amazingly, stunningly tedious. If you're waiting for something (anything) to happen, you will be sorely disappointed. Barnaby – the retarded son of a man who disappeared after the murder and who lives with his mother, is a minor character at best. The second half deals mainly with a massive anti-Catholic uprising in London in 1780, into which Barnaby, in his dull innocence, is dragged by a reprehensible lout from the Maypole who has an innate ability to lead others to destruction. Once the riots get under way, the action not only picks up but explodes in one of the best descriptions of mob rule ever put together. Dickens zeroes in on both personal motives and the intoxication of mob behavior, when normal inhibitions become absorbed by exhilarating mayhem. He brings remarkable insight to the current situation in America, including the acceleration of the riots by the soldiery's murderous attempts to put them down. I'm not quite finished reading Barnaby and I will go on. My main problem at this point is not so much wondering how it will all become reconciled, but understanding just what there is to reconcile. Good luck, Barnaby, whatever that may be and wherever it takes you.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Albertine67

    Okay - I have NOT read the complete works of Dickens. Having said that, I have over the years read a lot of his stuff. I bought this Kindle edition because, just before Christmas, I was talking to a friend about Dickens and mentioned my own favourite of his novels, Dombey and Son. My friend hadn't read or heard of it and it made me remember how long it had been since my last rereading. So at Christmas I bought one of these cheap huge editions and went back to it. Dombey and Son is every bit as w Okay - I have NOT read the complete works of Dickens. Having said that, I have over the years read a lot of his stuff. I bought this Kindle edition because, just before Christmas, I was talking to a friend about Dickens and mentioned my own favourite of his novels, Dombey and Son. My friend hadn't read or heard of it and it made me remember how long it had been since my last rereading. So at Christmas I bought one of these cheap huge editions and went back to it. Dombey and Son is every bit as wonderful as I remembered and little Paul Dombey, the old fashioned boy, remains one of my favourite characters ever. The chapter which relates his death is one of the most moving and beautifully written things I've ever read. There is no trace of sentimentality or mawkishness; just the spare and elegant prose of a most humane writer. For all his faults, I forgive him everything for that chapter alone.

  5. 5 out of 5

    classic reverie

    No errors noted so far. I thought the extra commentary was interesting. I will continue to read here and make notes but my reviews of selected novels will be at that the title page. Great navigation for this Delphi. Edition.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Michelle

    I'm sure this will be on my currently-reading shelf for a long time. Started with Pickwick Papers on 12/11/12.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Victor Castro

    Having recently read 'A Christmas Carol' (which I felt was apropos for the season at hand) I found it especially interesting in comparison with all the film and television adaptations I have watched over the years (my favorite being the 1951 version starring the excellent, Alastair Sim)–with more to come in the future, no doubt. I have confirmed ( to myself), why this tale is, and shall forever remain, a classic Christmas story for as long as Christmasses are remembered, in this world, anyway. I Having recently read 'A Christmas Carol' (which I felt was apropos for the season at hand) I found it especially interesting in comparison with all the film and television adaptations I have watched over the years (my favorite being the 1951 version starring the excellent, Alastair Sim)–with more to come in the future, no doubt. I have confirmed ( to myself), why this tale is, and shall forever remain, a classic Christmas story for as long as Christmasses are remembered, in this world, anyway. I look forward to further reading from Dicken's impressive oeuvre.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Shelley Bridgman

    Would take a week to review all of his work so I cheated and featured his complete works which I do own. Next to Oscar Wilde Dickens is my favourite author. He magically paints pictures with words and creates unforgettable characters. Even if many of his works are very long everyone should read some of the classic titles. From The Old Curiosity Shop and A Tale of Two cities to David Copperfield and Great Expectations. Masterpieces all

  9. 5 out of 5

    Renee

    You must read Dicken's for sheer entertainment, and insights on the human condition. He is a master of description, character and plot. Yes, he uses many words and waxes poetic over much, but the wax makes a candle to see into dark places. I read Christmas Carol every December! My other favorites are Great Expectations, Nicholas Nickleby, David Copperfield and Oliver Twist. You will laugh and cry over these stories and they will live in your heart forever.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Tristan

    This vast collection contains: * A Dinner at Poplar Walk - the author’s first published short story, a humorous slice of life. 3/5 * The Pickwick Papers - the author’s first serialised novel, an over-the-top pastiche of the times.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Jane

    I am reading A Christmas Carol from this collection.. Loved it!!

  12. 5 out of 5

    RICHARD STENTON

    This is an exceptional book with all the writings of Charles Dickens. Great Expectations was better than I had imagined and Oliver Twist and Tale of Two Cities are classics. The characters come to life under the prose of Dickens and their names conger up the feeling of their personality. You are immediately swept up in the story and can't wait to follow the development of the characters and the social implications he tries to convey. I am looking forward to more of the same after I relax and try This is an exceptional book with all the writings of Charles Dickens. Great Expectations was better than I had imagined and Oliver Twist and Tale of Two Cities are classics. The characters come to life under the prose of Dickens and their names conger up the feeling of their personality. You are immediately swept up in the story and can't wait to follow the development of the characters and the social implications he tries to convey. I am looking forward to more of the same after I relax and try some lighter material.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Leslie

    All of Dickens under one roof! Convenient to have all Dickens books under one roof. There were many lesser titles that I was not familiar with. However, don't lose your place because all the pages (THOUSANDS) are counted as one book! Turns out Delphi has also published individual books now, but I didn't know that when I DLed the Complete. Either way, I enjoyed all the extra notes and background not to mention the original engraved illustrations!

  14. 4 out of 5

    Rachel

    It is always good to revisit Dickens novels and I enjoyed listening to this audiobook. However, I have only given 3 stars, because the novels were so heavily abridged. This was disappointing, as incidents and characters failed to even make an appearance in some of the stories. Although, on the other hand, it was a good refresher and easy listening of familiar tales.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Emma

    There is nothing I can say about Charles Dickens that could possibly be worthy. All I can say is that he is held in great reverence by me. I have been a huge fan of his works since I was a young teenager.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Lauren

    Read

  17. 4 out of 5

    Randy

    You always have a great story!

  18. 4 out of 5

    R.W. Erskine

    what can one say, its Dickens

  19. 5 out of 5

    Shiv Shanker

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. oljhjjhjhhj

  20. 5 out of 5

    Angela

  21. 5 out of 5

    james

  22. 4 out of 5

    Nicolás Pérez

  23. 4 out of 5

    Michael J Agostino

  24. 5 out of 5

    Matt Briggs

  25. 4 out of 5

    John M.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Anthony James

  27. 4 out of 5

    Rachel Short

  28. 5 out of 5

    Rebekah Kensington

  29. 4 out of 5

    John

  30. 5 out of 5

    Andrew Knight

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