hits counter The Aesthetics of Music - Ebook PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

The Aesthetics of Music

Availability: Ready to download

What is music, what is its value, and what does it mean? In this stimulating volume, Roger Scruton offers a comprehensive account of the nature and significance of music from the perspective of modern philosophy. The study begins with the metaphysics of sound. Scruton 7istinguishes sound from tone; analyzes rhythm, melody, and harmony; and explores the various dimensions o What is music, what is its value, and what does it mean? In this stimulating volume, Roger Scruton offers a comprehensive account of the nature and significance of music from the perspective of modern philosophy. The study begins with the metaphysics of sound. Scruton 7istinguishes sound from tone; analyzes rhythm, melody, and harmony; and explores the various dimensions of musical organization and musical meaning. Taking on various fashionable theories in the philosophy and theory of music, he presents a compelling case for the moral significance of music, its place in our culture, and the need for taste and discrimination in performing and listening to it. Laying down principles for musical analysis and criticism, this bold work concludes with a theory of culture--and a devastating demolition of modern popular music. "A provocative new study."--The Guardian


Compare

What is music, what is its value, and what does it mean? In this stimulating volume, Roger Scruton offers a comprehensive account of the nature and significance of music from the perspective of modern philosophy. The study begins with the metaphysics of sound. Scruton 7istinguishes sound from tone; analyzes rhythm, melody, and harmony; and explores the various dimensions o What is music, what is its value, and what does it mean? In this stimulating volume, Roger Scruton offers a comprehensive account of the nature and significance of music from the perspective of modern philosophy. The study begins with the metaphysics of sound. Scruton 7istinguishes sound from tone; analyzes rhythm, melody, and harmony; and explores the various dimensions of musical organization and musical meaning. Taking on various fashionable theories in the philosophy and theory of music, he presents a compelling case for the moral significance of music, its place in our culture, and the need for taste and discrimination in performing and listening to it. Laying down principles for musical analysis and criticism, this bold work concludes with a theory of culture--and a devastating demolition of modern popular music. "A provocative new study."--The Guardian

30 review for The Aesthetics of Music

  1. 5 out of 5

    Edward

    The central contention of this book is that music is perceived as a succession of tones in a phenomenal space, and that listener must engage in an imaginative act of sympathy to receive the expressive implications of this succssion of tones. This act of sympathy is of the highest importance, not only in terms of aesthetics, but also in living fulfilling human lives. Profusely illustrated with a dazzling array of examples, Scruton's exposition contrasts with more structural approaches to understa The central contention of this book is that music is perceived as a succession of tones in a phenomenal space, and that listener must engage in an imaginative act of sympathy to receive the expressive implications of this succssion of tones. This act of sympathy is of the highest importance, not only in terms of aesthetics, but also in living fulfilling human lives. Profusely illustrated with a dazzling array of examples, Scruton's exposition contrasts with more structural approaches to understanding music (e.g. Schenker), and if his explanations of the virtual causality of tone and harmony are occasionally buttressed by metaphors, this serves to prove his point that the true nature of music cannot be brought under concepts. Many readers will be amused at his splenetic blast on the decline of popular music, others may find his Western-centric perspective restrictive, but this is a worthwhile read.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Steve

    This is a very solid work of Philosophy, by our greatest living philosopher, Roger Scruton. This is a very detailed work that journeys through topics such as: imagination and metaphor; expression; language; understanding; tonality; form; content; Analysis and performance and culture. It's rigourous, detailed and bears careful reading, and for someone like me (!) requires more than one reading!

  3. 4 out of 5

    Simon Mcleish

    Originally published on my blog here in June 1998. An academic survey of the philosophy of the aesthetics of music must cast its net quite wide. To try to understand the effects that music has on us, and how we distinguish music which has aesthetic effects from sound which does not. The subject, comprehensively surveyed by Roger Scruton, takes in psychology, musicology as well as general aesthetics and philosophy. A basic knowledge of philosophy and of music is required, though not to such an exte Originally published on my blog here in June 1998. An academic survey of the philosophy of the aesthetics of music must cast its net quite wide. To try to understand the effects that music has on us, and how we distinguish music which has aesthetic effects from sound which does not. The subject, comprehensively surveyed by Roger Scruton, takes in psychology, musicology as well as general aesthetics and philosophy. A basic knowledge of philosophy and of music is required, though not to such an extent as to exclude amateurs like myself. The discussion is clear, though some bias toward (for example) tonal music does come through. Some of the general aesthetic theory becomes quite hard going, but it is worth while for the understanding of the later music-related discussion. It is not a book which will change the way I listen to music, but it has certainly shown me the variety of issues which any theory of musical aesthetics needs to answer.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Richard Pohl

    Finely finished with this really heavy volume... with a kind of mixed feelings - after a pretty fussy and unnecesarilly excessive first chapters dealing with purely philosophical questions (without much of definite answers) he proceeds with quite brilliant and lucid thoughts on musical content and analysis... perhaps a slight disappointment, but definitely like Scruton's sharp wit with which he critizes most of the prevailing academic theories at the same time questioning mass culture and its co Finely finished with this really heavy volume... with a kind of mixed feelings - after a pretty fussy and unnecesarilly excessive first chapters dealing with purely philosophical questions (without much of definite answers) he proceeds with quite brilliant and lucid thoughts on musical content and analysis... perhaps a slight disappointment, but definitely like Scruton's sharp wit with which he critizes most of the prevailing academic theories at the same time questioning mass culture and its connection to the changes in the present world. Well, I disagree with some of his rather conservative conclusions, but I agree with his defension of tonality against all pretentious attempts of followers of the so-called "Second Viennese School". Quite interested in the next volume (Understanding Music), which I am going to tackle right now...

  5. 4 out of 5

    John Morgan

    Great insights into why we enjoy music. A big Book with big ideas.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Dudu Hdyr

  7. 4 out of 5

    Sara Burt

  8. 5 out of 5

    V

  9. 4 out of 5

    Enrico

  10. 5 out of 5

    James Bennett

  11. 5 out of 5

    Deborah

  12. 5 out of 5

    Vikas Datta

  13. 5 out of 5

    Crispy

  14. 5 out of 5

    Elisabeth Millenaar

  15. 4 out of 5

    Matt Roehrich

  16. 5 out of 5

    Neda Kolić

  17. 4 out of 5

    Epictetus

  18. 5 out of 5

    Stephen G Ashurst

  19. 4 out of 5

    Winifred

  20. 5 out of 5

    Felix Gulbrandsen

  21. 4 out of 5

    Laurie Rivera

  22. 4 out of 5

    Ben Hopgood

  23. 5 out of 5

    Ola

  24. 5 out of 5

    Jerry Balzano

  25. 5 out of 5

    Jochen

  26. 4 out of 5

    Garrett

  27. 5 out of 5

    John

  28. 4 out of 5

    John Swedberg

  29. 5 out of 5

    Luke

  30. 5 out of 5

    Rico McCahon

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.