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Service Design Patterns: Fundamental Design Solutions for SOAP/WSDL and RESTful Web Services

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Web services have been used for many years. In this time, developers and architects have encountered a number of recurring design challenges related to their usage, and have learned that certain service design approaches work better than others to solve certain problems.   In Service Design Patterns, Rob Daigneau codifies proven design solutions for web services that foll Web services have been used for many years. In this time, developers and architects have encountered a number of recurring design challenges related to their usage, and have learned that certain service design approaches work better than others to solve certain problems.   In Service Design Patterns, Rob Daigneau codifies proven design solutions for web services that follow the REST architectural style or leverage the SOAP/WSDL specifications. This catalogue identifies the fundamental topics in web service design and lists the common design patterns for each topic. All patterns identify the context in which they may be used, explain the constituent design elements, and explore the relative strengths and trade-offs. Code examples are provided to help you better understand how the patterns work but are kept general so that you can see how the solutions may be applied to disparate technologies that will inevitably change in the years to come.   This book will help readers answer the following questions: How do you create a web service API, what are the common API styles, and when should a particular style be used? How can clients and web services communicate, and what are the foundations for creating complex conversations in which multiple parties exchange data over extended periods of time? What are the options for implementing web service logic, and when should a particular approach be used? How can clients become less coupled to the underlying systems used by a service? How can information about a web service be discovered? How can generic functions like authentication, validation, caching, and logging be supported on the client or service? What changes to a service cause clients to break? What are the common ways to version a service? How can web services be designed to support the continuing evolution of business logic without forcing clients to constantly upgrade?  This book is an invaluable resource for enterprise architects, solution architects, and developers who use web services to create enterprise IT applications, commercial or open source products, and Software as a Service (SaaS) products that leverage emerging Cloud platforms.


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Web services have been used for many years. In this time, developers and architects have encountered a number of recurring design challenges related to their usage, and have learned that certain service design approaches work better than others to solve certain problems.   In Service Design Patterns, Rob Daigneau codifies proven design solutions for web services that foll Web services have been used for many years. In this time, developers and architects have encountered a number of recurring design challenges related to their usage, and have learned that certain service design approaches work better than others to solve certain problems.   In Service Design Patterns, Rob Daigneau codifies proven design solutions for web services that follow the REST architectural style or leverage the SOAP/WSDL specifications. This catalogue identifies the fundamental topics in web service design and lists the common design patterns for each topic. All patterns identify the context in which they may be used, explain the constituent design elements, and explore the relative strengths and trade-offs. Code examples are provided to help you better understand how the patterns work but are kept general so that you can see how the solutions may be applied to disparate technologies that will inevitably change in the years to come.   This book will help readers answer the following questions: How do you create a web service API, what are the common API styles, and when should a particular style be used? How can clients and web services communicate, and what are the foundations for creating complex conversations in which multiple parties exchange data over extended periods of time? What are the options for implementing web service logic, and when should a particular approach be used? How can clients become less coupled to the underlying systems used by a service? How can information about a web service be discovered? How can generic functions like authentication, validation, caching, and logging be supported on the client or service? What changes to a service cause clients to break? What are the common ways to version a service? How can web services be designed to support the continuing evolution of business logic without forcing clients to constantly upgrade?  This book is an invaluable resource for enterprise architects, solution architects, and developers who use web services to create enterprise IT applications, commercial or open source products, and Software as a Service (SaaS) products that leverage emerging Cloud platforms.

30 review for Service Design Patterns: Fundamental Design Solutions for SOAP/WSDL and RESTful Web Services

  1. 5 out of 5

    J Lavoie

    As is true with all patterns books, your reaction might be, “I already know all of this”. This book doesn’t try to identify new ideas. Instead, it gives a name to the approaches we’ve all been using for some time, and lists their pros and cons. It’s cool that the author identified names that were, in many cases, useful for both RESTful and SOAP style services. The code examples are helpful, but aren’t detailed or prescriptive “how-to” recipes. The author hints in the forward that you should proba As is true with all patterns books, your reaction might be, “I already know all of this”. This book doesn’t try to identify new ideas. Instead, it gives a name to the approaches we’ve all been using for some time, and lists their pros and cons. It’s cool that the author identified names that were, in many cases, useful for both RESTful and SOAP style services. The code examples are helpful, but aren’t detailed or prescriptive “how-to” recipes. The author hints in the forward that you should probably have an understanding of or an acquaintance with the technologies and frameworks that are used. Fowler also suggests in the forward that there are many other books out there for that type of thing. GoodReads ask you to identify the date you finished it. To be honest, I haven't read each and every page because the book clearly isn’t meant to be read cover to cover (it's pretty heavy reading), it’s more of a reference that you might look to when you need a nudge on the decision factors to consider. Still, I've read enough to evaluate it. I would highly recommend it.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Rod Hilton

    Most patterns books contain very little new information, usually they just provide terminology for things an experienced developer has seen or done countless times. As such, I admit it is somewhat unfair for me to feel the way I do about Service Design Patterns: that contains staggeringly little new information for an experienced developer. I knew not to expect to learn a great deal, but I still managed to find even less information than I expected. I think about 70% of the book will be immediate Most patterns books contain very little new information, usually they just provide terminology for things an experienced developer has seen or done countless times. As such, I admit it is somewhat unfair for me to feel the way I do about Service Design Patterns: that contains staggeringly little new information for an experienced developer. I knew not to expect to learn a great deal, but I still managed to find even less information than I expected. I think about 70% of the book will be immediately recognizable to anyone who has done any web service work before, and it won't particularly be new terminology, it's generally the standard terminology present in virtually any documentation. This is not to say it's a bad book; it's not bad, it's actually very well-written, well-organized, and very clear. The problem is that there simply doesn't seem to be enough material for an entire book here, and it often feels like the text is padded with common knowledge. There were two things that really irked me about the book. One was that it contained mention of Resource API as an approach to designing a web service API, but contained very little about REST beyond the absolute basics. I realize entire books have been written about properly designing RESTful APIs, but as I mentioned this book feels padded, so it could have easily stood a more thorough treatment. My biggest complaint with this book was its treatment of the issue of web service versioning. Versioning web services is mentioned, and the reasons to do so are enumerated, but very little guidance is provided for how to do so effectively. In my experience, properly versioning a web service API is one of the most challenging aspects of designing such an API. Obviously it's not difficult from the perspective of the external API itself, you just throw a version number in the URL or something, but it's very challenging in implementation. If you're at version 10 and a request comes in for version 3, what do you do? Do you have a request mapper for 3->10, process, and then a response mapper for 10->3? If so, then introducing 11 means writing 20 converters. Do you just write a 3->4 and a 4->3 when you introduce 4, then chain them together? It's all very complex and difficult to do properly, and I was hoping for some practical guidance. But instead, it has one of the weakest treatments in the book, without even the level of source code present for even trivial patterns elsewhere in the book. The book is good overall, but it's not great. It doesn't offer much in the way of new information or even insight into existing information. It does the basic job of a patterns book, in that it provides shared terminology, but the bulk of that terminology is standard in web service documentation anyway, so even that is unlikely to add much. I'd say it's worth reading if you're really new to web services, and maybe worth skimming quickly if you're more experienced.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Finlay

    The usual high standard from the Martin Fowler Series

  4. 4 out of 5

    JH

    The book explores several design patterns related to creating web services. The design considerations for picking each pattern is explored, covering concerns such as complexity, encapsulation, long-running tasks, stateful services, integration contracts, discovery, versioning, and evolving extensibility. It's not judgemental, and lets you decide for yourself which is the best use-case for each pattern. The code examples are not too useful. I'd prefer more flow/component diagrams myself. The book p The book explores several design patterns related to creating web services. The design considerations for picking each pattern is explored, covering concerns such as complexity, encapsulation, long-running tasks, stateful services, integration contracts, discovery, versioning, and evolving extensibility. It's not judgemental, and lets you decide for yourself which is the best use-case for each pattern. The code examples are not too useful. I'd prefer more flow/component diagrams myself. The book peppers references to the Gang of Four's Design Patterns, but as long as you have some experience/pain points in drafting web service interfaces, and roughly know what Factory pattern means, it's possible to infer what the author meant. Overall a worthy read if you enjoy designing software.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Khaled Al-Ansari

    What a read! yes it is made of information that almost all of it is known by senior engineers (and maybe some mid-level/intermediate) engineers but it is written in a way to be shared as concepts not practices for specific cases or languages and that was the goal of Martin Fowler when he sponsored the book according to his message at the beginning of the book. The examples are written with either Java or C# which I found as an excellent choice since these languages are verbose and force you to t What a read! yes it is made of information that almost all of it is known by senior engineers (and maybe some mid-level/intermediate) engineers but it is written in a way to be shared as concepts not practices for specific cases or languages and that was the goal of Martin Fowler when he sponsored the book according to his message at the beginning of the book. The examples are written with either Java or C# which I found as an excellent choice since these languages are verbose and force you to think about every aspect related to your work. I read this during the pandemic, I would recommend it for intermediate engineers who are looking to organize there thoughts about APIs and "seniors" who don't know how to share information in a searchable/understandable way.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Rydzyn

    It must have been a nice book in 2012. As of 2020, I found nothing interesting there. I went through it over 3 hours, skimming sections of all chapters. The patterns discussed here are already well established in the IT world, and the frameworks that you're using have already implemented them. Author categorizes them and gives them names, some of which I didn't know before, even though I saw these patterns e.g. as part of the Spring Boot framework. That's valuable if you want to implement things It must have been a nice book in 2012. As of 2020, I found nothing interesting there. I went through it over 3 hours, skimming sections of all chapters. The patterns discussed here are already well established in the IT world, and the frameworks that you're using have already implemented them. Author categorizes them and gives them names, some of which I didn't know before, even though I saw these patterns e.g. as part of the Spring Boot framework. That's valuable if you want to implement things without a framework. Instead of this book, these days I suggest to read "Building Microservices" by Sam Newman and "Relase It" by Michael Nygard.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Brian Di Croce

    The author provides a very concise catalog of patterns that targets distributed services by tackling strategies related to communication, security and data serialization among services. The code being shown is either in Java or C#, but the ideas can be applied with other languages too. This is a nice companion for the Enterprise Integration Patterns book.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Robert Lara III

    For anyone who is building web services for the first time, this is a great book to learn about all the pitfalls of different architecture decisions. While a 5 to 10 year software engineer may know some of this due to experience, this book still has a lesson or two to teach any veteran.

  9. 4 out of 5

    John

    This book is pretty good place to start if you're still new to web services and design patterns. But I stress the word *start*. If you've done any significant work in this area and aren't confused by the acronym GoF then you should probably skip this. You won't learn anything new and you'll probably be annoyed that some of his guidance is given no real context or in-depth discussion or even decent justification. This book is pretty good place to start if you're still new to web services and design patterns. But I stress the word *start*. If you've done any significant work in this area and aren't confused by the acronym GoF then you should probably skip this. You won't learn anything new and you'll probably be annoyed that some of his guidance is given no real context or in-depth discussion or even decent justification.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Joshua

    A lot of good ideas here, but the language/environment choices (Java/C#) are very different from my native tongues, so was hard to find the wheat in the chaff.

  11. 5 out of 5

    David Ruiz Ramirez

    ok

  12. 5 out of 5

    Christophe Addinquy

    This book should have been a nice complement over Enterprise Integration Patterns, but in the end, it's not. I have a mixed feeling about this book. It misses the Pattern Language philosophy or even the Design Patterns concept at all. The author is looking for covering the field as well as possible. In the end there is some useful stuff out there, such as clarification of what can be used in what situation. It makes this book not that useless. ma note de lecture en français ici This book should have been a nice complement over Enterprise Integration Patterns, but in the end, it's not. I have a mixed feeling about this book. It misses the Pattern Language philosophy or even the Design Patterns concept at all. The author is looking for covering the field as well as possible. In the end there is some useful stuff out there, such as clarification of what can be used in what situation. It makes this book not that useless. ma note de lecture en français ici

  13. 4 out of 5

    MSA

  14. 4 out of 5

    John Stoneham

  15. 4 out of 5

    John

  16. 4 out of 5

    fxleloup

  17. 4 out of 5

    Ke Zhu

  18. 4 out of 5

    Marcio Vieira

  19. 4 out of 5

    Olivier Theriault

  20. 4 out of 5

    Michael Lutton

  21. 5 out of 5

    Sbsf

  22. 4 out of 5

    Tiago Macedo

  23. 4 out of 5

    Subhajit Das

  24. 4 out of 5

    Lars

  25. 4 out of 5

    Miguel Alho

  26. 4 out of 5

    Vít Kotačka

  27. 4 out of 5

    Philip

  28. 5 out of 5

    Umut Salih

  29. 4 out of 5

    Rafael Carmona

  30. 4 out of 5

    Otto Pöllath

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