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Four years after Tom and Abby's 12-year-old daughter vanishes, she is found alive but strangely calm. When the teen refuses to testify against the man connected to her disappearance, Tom decides to investigate the traumatizing case on his own. Nothing can prepare him for what he is about to discover. Four years after Tom and Abby's 12-year-old daughter vanishes, she is found alive but strangely calm. When the teen refuses to testify against the man connected to her disappearance, Tom decides to investigate the traumatizing case on his own. Nothing can prepare him for what he is about to discover.


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Four years after Tom and Abby's 12-year-old daughter vanishes, she is found alive but strangely calm. When the teen refuses to testify against the man connected to her disappearance, Tom decides to investigate the traumatizing case on his own. Nothing can prepare him for what he is about to discover. Four years after Tom and Abby's 12-year-old daughter vanishes, she is found alive but strangely calm. When the teen refuses to testify against the man connected to her disappearance, Tom decides to investigate the traumatizing case on his own. Nothing can prepare him for what he is about to discover.

30 review for Cemetery Girl

  1. 5 out of 5

    Melani

    I should clarify first and say that I am not the target audience for this book. These types of novels, thrillers/real life sadness whatever, bore me unless they are very well written. Add that fact to the very major problems I had with the themes and plot of this novel and I think I'm being generous with one star. The only reason I finished this book is because I have a goal number to reach by the end of the year. The major problem I have with the novel is that the rape and kidnapping of the daug I should clarify first and say that I am not the target audience for this book. These types of novels, thrillers/real life sadness whatever, bore me unless they are very well written. Add that fact to the very major problems I had with the themes and plot of this novel and I think I'm being generous with one star. The only reason I finished this book is because I have a goal number to reach by the end of the year. The major problem I have with the novel is that the rape and kidnapping of the daughter character is used as a catalyst for our protagonist to deal with his abusive father. Yep, a female's pain is once again merely the backdrop for a male to work out his issues. I don't have a problem with a novel about a girl's disappearance and reappearance as told from the point of view as the father, but I don't think the main issue to be worked out should be his. Also, all the characters have agendas, and while that's great, not a single one of those agendas is about what is best for the girl, except perhaps the mother, and she's the single most villainized character in the novel outside the kidnapper who only appears briefly for a scene or two. The protagonist is so concerned with finding out WHAT happened that he loses sight of the fact that he might not need to know right at that very moment because his daughter isn't ready to talk about it. And then there's the fact that I plain didn't like the protagonist. He was a self-centered jerk and hard to sympathize with in any way.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Sara

    See here's the thing. You aren't writing anything new or amazing just because your protagonist isn't Dudley Do Right. Tom Stuart is a kind of a jerk college professor and his wife is a born again Christian looney tune and their distant twelve year old daughter is...umm...distant? I don't know. Anyway the daughter disappears only to reappear four years later as a bitchy teenager who curses a lot and is in love with her abductor because Stockholm Syndrome or something. But this makes no sense beca See here's the thing. You aren't writing anything new or amazing just because your protagonist isn't Dudley Do Right. Tom Stuart is a kind of a jerk college professor and his wife is a born again Christian looney tune and their distant twelve year old daughter is...umm...distant? I don't know. Anyway the daughter disappears only to reappear four years later as a bitchy teenager who curses a lot and is in love with her abductor because Stockholm Syndrome or something. But this makes no sense because the abductor is really ugly or something! Tom sets out to find out the truth! But he's kind of a jerk about it. Oh and there's a half brother with a gambling problem and Tom may or may not have been beaten as a child. Its not remotely relevant to anything, except perhaps Tom's jerkitude, but we certainly hear about it often enough. Wow, how very new and different. What's particularly wonderful (everyone get out your sarcasm detectors!) about this book is it's non-ending. I have no trouble with an author deciding to leave things on a precipice where the reader remains unclear of the ultimate outcome. In this case its nothing short of ridiculous. It seems Bell simply thought it would be really cool to end the story on a "who can tell what happens next" note not because it actually serves the story. My big problem here was that I didn't know what or who I was supposed to care about and consequently I didn't care about anyone or anything. All the characters are so vague and poorly developed and I had so little feeling or understanding about what the family was like BEFORE the abduction and Bell commits that most horrendous of thriller novel crimes, everyone is at exactly the same point they were when the book started. I seriously hate that. It's so unsatisfying. The lesson I learned here is "DO NOT BELIEVE THE REVIEWS ON THE BACK OF THE BOOK!!!!" which assured me that I would not believe the ending, I would not be able to put this book down, and that Bell has totally turned the kidnapped kid genre on its head. There's nothing new here kids, its all been done before and I might add, much better.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Cynthia

    At first I really like this book--the story clipped along at a good pace, but not too fast. The idea of the missing child returning home, changed and unwilling to discuss what happened seemed so good. There was so much that could have been done with it. Sadly, in the end it just came off as a creepy look at violence against young women by every man in their lives. I felt the Caitlin character was done well and seemed realistic. However, Tom and Abby were far too Lifetime Movie of the week charac At first I really like this book--the story clipped along at a good pace, but not too fast. The idea of the missing child returning home, changed and unwilling to discuss what happened seemed so good. There was so much that could have been done with it. Sadly, in the end it just came off as a creepy look at violence against young women by every man in their lives. I felt the Caitlin character was done well and seemed realistic. However, Tom and Abby were far too Lifetime Movie of the week characters. Abby had promise, but she just was pushed aside and relegated to the silly, too optimistic religion lady incapable of making a difference. Tom, our narrator, was simply ridiculous. All of the secondary characters were cookie-cutter--the hard but honest cop, the pit-bull female lawyer and victim advocate, the saintly volunteer counselor, the hypocritical pastor, and the cold authoritative shrink. A book with tons of potential that just fell apart. With so many books to pick, feel free to pass on this one.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Molly

    I love a book that I cannot put down, and I could not put down Cemetery Girl. But this novel wasn't only a page turner; it was also a story that let me feel deeply connected to the characters, especially Tom, the father who so desperately wants to re-connect with his sixteen-year-old daughter, a lost girl-woman who is found alive four years after her disappearance. A novel that so brilliantly weaves character development with such a tense plot deserves serious attention. This would be a great bo I love a book that I cannot put down, and I could not put down Cemetery Girl. But this novel wasn't only a page turner; it was also a story that let me feel deeply connected to the characters, especially Tom, the father who so desperately wants to re-connect with his sixteen-year-old daughter, a lost girl-woman who is found alive four years after her disappearance. A novel that so brilliantly weaves character development with such a tense plot deserves serious attention. This would be a great book club read or a good choice for anyone who likes a novel with character development AND good plot. Also, the trailer kicks butt! Watch it here: http://www.davidbellnovels.com/traile...

  5. 4 out of 5

    Melissa ♥ Dog/Wolf Lover ♥ Martin

    www.melissa413readsalot.blogspot.com I just didn't get into this book at all and that makes me sad. I always try to pick books I think I will like or love and I hate giving anything under three stars, but that's life. Tom and Abby's little girl of twelve years old goes missing one day when she is taking her dog Frosty for a walk at the park. First off, who in the hell lets their kids go off on their own! After four years Abby wants to put up a headstone and have a memorial for Caitlin. I understa www.melissa413readsalot.blogspot.com I just didn't get into this book at all and that makes me sad. I always try to pick books I think I will like or love and I hate giving anything under three stars, but that's life. Tom and Abby's little girl of twelve years old goes missing one day when she is taking her dog Frosty for a walk at the park. First off, who in the hell lets their kids go off on their own! After four years Abby wants to put up a headstone and have a memorial for Caitlin. I understand parents wanting to have a final resting place, but after four years I don't see how you can do that. We come to find out that good ole Abby is spending too much time with Pastor Chris. They seem to have more going on than what it seems and I don't like her character at all! From the very beginning when she had Tom take Caitlin's dog Frosty to the pound because SHE wants to start over. He doesn't want to take the dog but the dumbass does, he did go back and try to get Frosty but they had already adopted the dog out. Then she decides she wants to get a divorce and start over and start teaching again.. and good ole Pastor Chris is going to let her stay in some temporary housing. Right..... Well Tom is just devastated. He doesn't want the memorial to Caitlin either, but nothing he wants happens. He tells Abby he could have kept the dog that he loved. Her answer to that was I wanted it done for you so you could move on! BITCH! He says he looks at Frosty and remembers Caitlin, not wants to forget her! Anyhoo... a while later they find someone that gives information on a man that they think is the kidnapper. Well, it was and some stuff happens.. blah blah.. Then they find Caitlin roaming around the cemetery! The police go over her and try to get answers but she's sixteen and not the same person, of course. She's foul mouthed and acts all hateful toward her parents. And.. she's still in love with her capture and wants to be with him... I feel so bad for these kids or anyone like that :( The only thing I like about the book is the end when Caitlin and her father are walking at the park and they find Frosty :) An older couple adopted Frosty but could see who he loved. It brought the sullen teenager back to that sweet little girl, if only for a little bit.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Jenelle Eager

    This book captured me at the book store by the cover and the premise, and it's definitely in my genre, maybe an edgier Jodi Picoult with the family dynamics and missing girl plot. I would say I liked a lot of the book, and I am just shy enough of 4 stars to have to give it three because, as others have mentioned, about half to three quarters of the way through the father's behavior was really disturbing and his obsession was difficult to stomach as the decisions he made became less about his dau This book captured me at the book store by the cover and the premise, and it's definitely in my genre, maybe an edgier Jodi Picoult with the family dynamics and missing girl plot. I would say I liked a lot of the book, and I am just shy enough of 4 stars to have to give it three because, as others have mentioned, about half to three quarters of the way through the father's behavior was really disturbing and his obsession was difficult to stomach as the decisions he made became less about his daughter and more of a crusade, which I found baffling. I disliked Abby, disliked Tom, disliked Tom's brother, disliked the pastor, and I think the only real character I grew attached to was Frosty, which just made my dislike for Tom and Abby grow. I read the book on a trip and thought to bring it back to a friend as we always share books. The first half of the book was promising and I would've rated it at least 4 stars, but the end was underwhelming enough that I decided to leave the book and save space in my carry on for other reads. However, the very last page I did enjoy in a feel good kinda way and left me with a sliver of hope for salvation for the family, so that almost, almost changed my mind.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Bill

    Sentimental Abduction (2012) Bell, David (2011). Cemetery Girl. New York: New American Library. A 12-year old girl goes missing while walking her dog in a cemetery. There are no leads. She is presumed abducted, and after a year or so, presumed dead. The story is told, first-person, by the father, who never gives up hope on her. The mother, on the other hand is “ready to move on” with her life. The marriage is on the rocks and the mother now has a romantic interest with the pastor of her church w Sentimental Abduction (2012) Bell, David (2011). Cemetery Girl. New York: New American Library. A 12-year old girl goes missing while walking her dog in a cemetery. There are no leads. She is presumed abducted, and after a year or so, presumed dead. The story is told, first-person, by the father, who never gives up hope on her. The mother, on the other hand is “ready to move on” with her life. The marriage is on the rocks and the mother now has a romantic interest with the pastor of her church who helped her grieve. Much later, after many pages of self-indulgent angst, an informant appears who claims to have seen the girl alive, four years after the disappearance. Very slowly, over hundreds of pages, clues develop and the police find the girl, now 16, but she is uncommunicative and hostile toward her parents. She wants to go back to her captor, a man in his 50’s, who she says she loves. The father and his brother attempt to find him, since the police aren’t doing much. Finally there is a confrontation, in the cemetery, with the father, brother, girl, and captor. The big scene. The story of child abduction is oft-told, likewise its effects on the grieving parents. Far from providing fresh insight, the author wallows in the unself-aware emotions of the parents. Long tracts of such material give “page-turner” new meaning. The characters are mercurial in the extreme, reacting arbitrarily, showing little internal consistency, and no development over time. The fundamental psychological flaw in the story is the presumption that an abducted child would turn against her parents because she was not rescued promptly. In fact parent-child relations grow slowly over many years, not as the result of any one incident. Even children who were physically and sexually abused by parents usually want to be reunited with them. These are ordinary, mild, polite, middle-class parents who ostensibly love their daughter and never harmed her. One flashback scene describes the pre-abduction relationship between father and daughter, and it reveals the father as emotionally stunted and interpersonally alienated, but that’s about the extent of his crime. The best part of the book is the perplexing question it poses, what would you do if your teenage daughter no longer loved you and wanted to rejoin her captor? Psychologically implausible though that scenario is, it is interesting. Alas, the question is not explored well here. The father beats people up, and in turn, gets beat up, several times. That is his “method” of exploring the question, apparently. The writing is competent but mundane. Dialog is full of deadwood that neither advances the story nor reveals the characters. The scenery is vanilla suburbia. The characters are bland middle-class white people with little self-awareness. The story is largely cliché. So overall, there is not much to attract readers who eschew maudlin sentimentality.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Rebecca Peck

    This is the first review I've written on here, but i felt some of the reviews of this book were unfair, so I felt compelled. Some people gave this book a bad rating because, "None of the characters were likable." I guess that's what makes people different, because that's exactly why I enjoyed this book. The characters were well-developed and this was not the fairy tale ending of a family reunited with their child who was ripped from their lives by a crazy pedophile. When traumas happen we all co This is the first review I've written on here, but i felt some of the reviews of this book were unfair, so I felt compelled. Some people gave this book a bad rating because, "None of the characters were likable." I guess that's what makes people different, because that's exactly why I enjoyed this book. The characters were well-developed and this was not the fairy tale ending of a family reunited with their child who was ripped from their lives by a crazy pedophile. When traumas happen we all cope differently and it changes people. Trauma changes how you interpret everything around you, including when something positive happens - like when these parents were reunited with their kidnapped daughter. The mom turned to religion and her smarmy pastor. She believed placing a headstone at a grave would tie up all of her unresolved feelings neatly and be buried, despite not burying a body. The dad resented the absence of hope displayed by his wife, but avoided telling her his feelings. Upon the daughter's return, she saw her parents' crappy relationship, longed for the affection of her captor, and was a teenager challenging the awkward adults around her. Somehow, I see this book as a more accurate and honest depiction of what a family might go through during this situation. I didn't particularly like any of the characters (except for the dog), but I understood their emotions and actions, and their interactions kept me reading until the end. If you're looking for happily ever after, this isn't your read. If you're looking for a better ending than most kidnap victims get, give it a try.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Michael

    Cemetery Girl has been languishing on my to-be-read shelf since I picked it up at a bargain book sale a couple of years ago. I'd heard some buzz about the book and was excited to get my hands on a copy of the book since my local library didn't have a copy at the time. I'm guessing that initial enthusiasm wore off or else I got distracted by other books either that I purchased, received as ARCs or checked out from the local library. And so it was that I was getting ready for last weekend's World R Cemetery Girl has been languishing on my to-be-read shelf since I picked it up at a bargain book sale a couple of years ago. I'd heard some buzz about the book and was excited to get my hands on a copy of the book since my local library didn't have a copy at the time. I'm guessing that initial enthusiasm wore off or else I got distracted by other books either that I purchased, received as ARCs or checked out from the local library. And so it was that I was getting ready for last weekend's World Read-athon day that I stumbled across the book in my to-be-read pile and decided maybe it was time to move it up in the rotation. Four years ago, Tom and Abby's 12-year-old daughter Caitlin disappeared from their local park while walking their dog. In that time, Abby and Tom have grown apart as Tom continues to follow up any lead or shred of evidence that he thinks could bring Caitlin back and Abby turns to more spiritual means to find comfort and acceptance that their daughter has vanished and may not come back. Just as Abby is ready to close the door on Caitlin's return and Tom chases down what he feels is the promising lead they've had in years, Caitlin is returned, dirty, bruised and refusing to discuss where she's been the past four years. Caitlin's return isn't necessarily the happy ending that Tom imagined it would be. Her return only fuels his anger and determination to find out what happened and who took her. And Caitlin refuses to give away any answers to her parents or to the authorities. Cemetery Girl is a fascinating but ultimately frustrating novel. It's a suspense thriller whose pages turn by quickly and where a new development or red herring comes up at a nice clip. This is a good thing because it doesn't allow the reader to slow question things taking place in the novel or certain developments. At least until the novel's final third when David J. Bell begins to pile on absurdity on top of the next as the dominoes begin to fall and we find out what happened to Caitlin and some of her motivation for staying silent. Bell sews a seed of doubt about Caitlin early in the novel as Tom relates an incident from early in her life where she lied to him to his face. I kept expecting this incident to have more of an impact on things or to imply that Caitlin was somehow involved in her disappearance but these seeds never bear any fruit. Instead it feels more like one more red herring in a novel that has one or two red herrings too many. There's also a subplot about Caitlin's uncle that never quite pays off as it should or could. Cemetery Girl is a novel with a lot of potential and yet I couldn't help but come away feeling dissatisfied by it. The twists and turns of the final third don't seem quite exaggerated enough based on what the plot threads and details Bell includes in the first third of the novel. There's also a lot of questions I had about characters and their motivations in the final third that aren't adequately addressed or explained. And the ending feels a bit abrupt and pointless. After spending three hundred or so pages with the story, I wasn't necessarily looking for a "happy ending" but I was hoping we'd get something more than what Bell gives us. This novel had a lot of potential. It's just too bad it didn't live up to all of it.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Lee Rene

    I'm torn regarding this book. It is a page turner, a very fast 389 pages that I finished in one sitting. The novel earned stellar reviews, was even whispered as a potential nominee for a Pulitzer for fiction and the author, an English professor at Western Kentucky University has real credentials. Despite all the pluses, I had real issues with this work. It lacked the descriptive power that I expect in first-rate writing. The prose was tight and efficient, but missing both a sensory and emotional I'm torn regarding this book. It is a page turner, a very fast 389 pages that I finished in one sitting. The novel earned stellar reviews, was even whispered as a potential nominee for a Pulitzer for fiction and the author, an English professor at Western Kentucky University has real credentials. Despite all the pluses, I had real issues with this work. It lacked the descriptive power that I expect in first-rate writing. The prose was tight and efficient, but missing both a sensory and emotional component. Even though it was written in the first person, I felt that the author was detached from the story. In addition, most of the adult characters were either monsters or morons. The protagonist, a college professor whose daughter was abducted at the age of twelve made one inane decision after another, and though the plot involves the abduction and rape of a child, neither the police or parents behaved in a realistic way. There have been too many high-profile examples of child abductions including the Elizabeth Smart case that I questioned why Bell had his protagonist behave in such a wacky way. There are two very important characters who are used as plot devices and never fully explored. One, a 20-year old stripper who was abducted and impregnated by the prep is simply abandoned. The other,a twelve-year-old runaway who also fell victim to the same monster, is almost ignored by the protagonist, her relationship to the perpetrator never mentioned to the police. The violent, illogical ways in which that the characters behave detract from what could have been a superior novel.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Ashley

    Half way through this book it had the promise of being great, the description of events and mixed powerful feelings was incredible. It was heart-wrenching, and horrible. As a parent, there is no way in hell you could be in the presence of the man who kidnapped and molested your child and not kill him. It just isn't possible. I can't understand wanting to know the details that badly its kind of sick, and a little disturbing. I think Freud would have some choice views on that one. Who wants to kno Half way through this book it had the promise of being great, the description of events and mixed powerful feelings was incredible. It was heart-wrenching, and horrible. As a parent, there is no way in hell you could be in the presence of the man who kidnapped and molested your child and not kill him. It just isn't possible. I can't understand wanting to know the details that badly its kind of sick, and a little disturbing. I think Freud would have some choice views on that one. Who wants to know the dirty details involving their daughters rape? Gross, and perverted. Like I said it had the promise of being great, then got super duper creepy. Seriously you want the details so bad you make plans to exchange your child..........seriously with the RAPIST. Wrong. I don't usually hate books either but this one, made me sick. Don't waste your time or money on this junk.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Rae

    While there were some parts of the book that were very good and realistic, such as the interaction between the main character and his wife, there were other parts that weren't. I could see what the author was trying to do, but that was the problem. It was too obvious, to blatant. Some of reminiscences felt too much like tangents. I also felt like the book fell on it's face in the last couple of chapters. You're at the climax of the story and all of a sudden it's the epilogue. It doesn't transiti While there were some parts of the book that were very good and realistic, such as the interaction between the main character and his wife, there were other parts that weren't. I could see what the author was trying to do, but that was the problem. It was too obvious, to blatant. Some of reminiscences felt too much like tangents. I also felt like the book fell on it's face in the last couple of chapters. You're at the climax of the story and all of a sudden it's the epilogue. It doesn't transition well at all and I felt the ending was rather blah. Caitlin before her capture came off as creepy rather than as a normal child because of the scene with her nearly getting run over when the book opened. This made it hard to really care about her through the rest of the book. Yes terrible things happen to her that no one should have to go through, but her character always felt rather flat to me, especially because all the other characters are so animated and emotional. I don't really consider this book a mystery or a thriller. There really wasn't much of a mystery, you know pretty early on in the book who the culprit is, and despite the attempts to cast doubt on another character it's still blatantly obvious. And the book didn't really seem like much of a thriller in my opinion. That aside, it's not a bad read. It's interesting, and the author does a good job at many aspects of the relationships between the characters. But that's really what the book is about, the relationships between people who surround Caitlin's abduction, the events themselves and any mystery/thriller aspects are secondary. If this is the kind of story you're looking for you'll probably enjoy it.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Alison

    Disappointed. Frustrated. The author had an opportunity to delve into the grief and turmoil of a father who lost his daughter, a father who never gave up his search for her and who faced many consequences for that choice. Instead, the author gave us an idiot. An idiot named Tom. Many times throughout the book I found myself actually laughing at loud at this character and the stupidity of the choices he made. I would've rather read this book from the point of view of the wife, because she at leas Disappointed. Frustrated. The author had an opportunity to delve into the grief and turmoil of a father who lost his daughter, a father who never gave up his search for her and who faced many consequences for that choice. Instead, the author gave us an idiot. An idiot named Tom. Many times throughout the book I found myself actually laughing at loud at this character and the stupidity of the choices he made. I would've rather read this book from the point of view of the wife, because she at least seemed to have some reason and logic behind her actions. This book was a waste of time.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Serenity

    As someone who loves reading about kidnappings and disappearance I was obviously drawn to this book because of what it offered. BUT WHAT THE FUCK I feel like this book was written so poorly. The protagonist is just horrible. I tried to have sympathy for him because his daughter was gone and he seemed to love her, but as I moved forward he was just too annoying and self-absorbed. WHY THE HELL WOULD YOU EVEN PRETEND TO GIVE YOUR DAUGHTER BACK TO THE MAN WHO KIDNAPPED AND RAPED HER. His returned dau As someone who loves reading about kidnappings and disappearance I was obviously drawn to this book because of what it offered. BUT WHAT THE FUCK I feel like this book was written so poorly. The protagonist is just horrible. I tried to have sympathy for him because his daughter was gone and he seemed to love her, but as I moved forward he was just too annoying and self-absorbed. WHY THE HELL WOULD YOU EVEN PRETEND TO GIVE YOUR DAUGHTER BACK TO THE MAN WHO KIDNAPPED AND RAPED HER. His returned daughter was almost just as bad. I really wanted to like her and possibly feel some sort of connection because she’d been through such a horrible thing but it was impossible. I get that she had Stockholm syndrome or something but she was so unlikable and irritating. In fact, basically all the characters were unlikable in their own right. Except for the dog. Speaking of the dog what are the chance that a couple who’d just adopted a dog from the shelter are going to just randomly give the dog to strangers? They had no proof that Frosty was their dog. That part was pretty laughable. Especially since it was supposed to be so heartwarming. Basically, this book wasn’t worth it. The characters are irritating, unlikable, and flat overall. Don’t bother with it. I only read this whole book because I hate starting a book and leaving it unfinished. I want the time I wasted on this book back.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Karen Bonilla

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. This book was a horrible book. Frankly, I'm shocked at the number of good reviews it got. There was not a single like able character in this book! The girls mother is a listless, empty person who refuses to even see her daughter when she is returned to them. What kind of mother refuses to see a daughter who has been missing for four years? The father seems to not even care about his daughters trauma or her emotional needs. He only wants to know what happened to her. He does take her to a therapi This book was a horrible book. Frankly, I'm shocked at the number of good reviews it got. There was not a single like able character in this book! The girls mother is a listless, empty person who refuses to even see her daughter when she is returned to them. What kind of mother refuses to see a daughter who has been missing for four years? The father seems to not even care about his daughters trauma or her emotional needs. He only wants to know what happened to her. He does take her to a therapist but then he refuses to leave the room because he wants to hear what she has to say. He even agrees to take her back to see her abductor and almost let's her leave with him if he is told the entire story. The girls story could have been a gripping tale, except that we never really connect with her. There is no inkling of her true personality, her feelings, any events that happened to her. She is like an empty shell that only wants to go back to her abductor. I would not recommend this book to anyone. It was a totally boring, badly written waste of time.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Chris Wolak

    This is one of those books that I almost stopped reading once or twice, but then something surprising would happen and I'd find myself reading later than planned, negotiating with myself that after I read just one more chapter then I'd do xy and z. With it being October, I was hoping Cemetery Girl would be a creepy book, learning more towards horror, but it is a psychological suspense novel, mainly about Tom, the father of a twelve year old girl named Caitlin who goes missing for four years. No c This is one of those books that I almost stopped reading once or twice, but then something surprising would happen and I'd find myself reading later than planned, negotiating with myself that after I read just one more chapter then I'd do xy and z. With it being October, I was hoping Cemetery Girl would be a creepy book, learning more towards horror, but it is a psychological suspense novel, mainly about Tom, the father of a twelve year old girl named Caitlin who goes missing for four years. No clues, no ransom note, no nothing. Caitlin's Mom, Abby, is trying to move on and has turned all her energies toward her church, including her sexual energy, it seems, as Tom believes she's having an affair with Pastor Chris. At first you think Abby is a real schmuck and that the husband, Tom, is the good guy, trying to keep the candle of hope lit for his daughter's return. But then his likeability is thrown into doubt early on for dumping the family dog at the pound. And then you learn he did it as a last ditch effort to save his marriage. Still, not forgivable (not for me, anyway), but perhaps understandable for some. Then you learn that it was that nasty Pastor Chris who put the idea of getting rid of the dog into Abby's head as a way to 'help' Tom move on and that just made me think of Pat Robertson recently telling a caller to divorce his wife with Alzheimer's and move on, but that's a whole 'nother story. Let's just say the situation left me wondering whether or not to go on reading a 389 page book with characters that I didn't particularly like from the beginning. One of the things that kept me reading was the character of Tom and how my feelings about him weren't easy to pin down. If you plan on reading Cemetery Girl and don't like spoilers, you might want to stop reading now. It dawned on me fairly early that perhaps Tom isn't exactly a reliable narrator. He is, after all, an English professor writing a book about Hawthorne. Eventually you start to question just about everything going on in the novel, especially everyone's motives, as well as their IQs and their emotional intelligence. It got to the point where I thought a good alternate title for the book would be Parents Behaving Badly. Or just Bad Dad. If I had to sum up Tom in one sentence, I'd say he's a narcissist loner with anger management issues probably suffering from PTSD stemming from childhood abuse at the hands of an alcoholic step-father and a mother who just can't handle the truth. First he's obsessed with believing against all odds that Caitlin is still alive and will come home. All he wants is for her to come home. Its okay that this part of the novel is all about him and his feelings. But then when Caitlin does come home he becomes obsessed with learning not so much about what happened to her, but about why she stayed with the man who abducted her. In other words, why she chose her abductor over him. At a time when his daughter most needs his attention, it's still all about him. This is when you really start to think something's wrong with the guy. Is should be all about his daughter now. Maybe he never really was a good father. The prologue sorta makes you wonder about that. And other things happen. Such as the fact that he makes and then promptly breaks a promise to Caitlin on her first day back, yells at her, slaps her, and grabs her arm so tightly that he doesn't care if he bruises her just days after her return. He feels bad about spitting into another man's face, but justifies hitting his daughter as an attempt to help her. He's also judgemental of just about everyone else. It is always about him and is feelings. In fact he pesters Caitlin with this whiny rant: "What made you stay?” I asked. “Why, after all that, did you stay? People saw you with him in public places. You could have screamed and cried. You could have run away. Why did you stay with him? Why did you do that . . . ?” I resisted for a long moment. I tried to swallow it back, but finally I couldn't hold it in. “Why did you do that to me, Caitlin? Why?” (355). I have no idea if David Bell set out to write a bad dad novel. Tom wants to have a family, but it seems like he wants to have it without having to work at it. He sits and laments about Caitlin's hygiene, table manners, and cursing and says, "All the things we could have helped, the disciplinary battles we could have fought, were lost. What was left?" (350). What? She's only sixteen and has just been through four years of sexual assault and mind control and Daddy Dearest is ready to throw in the towel after just a few days? In the Epilogue Tom says to his brother, "In the end, my instincts as a father are stronger than anything else" (387). Some readers may feel like that's a nice wrap up. It might make them feel warm and fuzzy about Tom and fatherhood. But it creeped me out. Tom made many rash and irrational decisions, put his daughter in harms way, was abusive towards her on more than one occassion, and lied to everyone in his life. Is he carrying on his family of origin's legacy of abuse and silence? Wraping himself up in the protective cloak of 'parental instinct' that outsiders don't dare question? That's what it seems like to me. David Bell does a great job holding it all together. I didn't like any of the characters in this novel, yet I kept reading, wondering what was going to happen next, even when some of the characters, as seen through Tom's eyes, do some pretty unrealistic things and make seriously poor choices. Issues of trust abound in this novel, as do those of power, control, parenting skills, and family ties. I am impressed with Bell's skill at weaving only Tom's perspective throughout this tale.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Chandra Claypool (WhereTheReaderGrows)

    Tom and Abby's 12 year old daughter goes missing one day while walking her dog.  They both deal with her disappearance in different ways which takes a toll on their marriage.  Then one day, Caitlin is found.. but those 4 years has changed her.  She's sullen, rude and not the daughter they remember.  Tom desperately tries to find out what's going on but that's hard when his daughter makes him promise not to ask her about her time away.. and the answers he ends up finding is worse than anything hi Tom and Abby's 12 year old daughter goes missing one day while walking her dog.  They both deal with her disappearance in different ways which takes a toll on their marriage.  Then one day, Caitlin is found.. but those 4 years has changed her.  She's sullen, rude and not the daughter they remember.  Tom desperately tries to find out what's going on but that's hard when his daughter makes him promise not to ask her about her time away.. and the answers he ends up finding is worse than anything his mind had imagined. Just wow.  David Bell has a way of pulling you right into his world... and this one is through Tom's perspective as he struggles with his dying marriage, his daughter's return and his past grievances from his childhood.  We see the struggle of a father that will do anything, even at the expense of his own child, to find out the truth of what happened.  When is the knowledge of the unknown more important than justice?  How many lines would you cross to get the answers you think you need?   Set at a somewhat slow to moderate pace, we get a deep look into the psyche of Tom as he slowly unravels.  While I usually like my books at a faster pace, I couldn't stop reading.  I turned page after page after page and work be damned, finished this in practically one sitting.  Very much looking forward to reading his other works. Thanks so much to Berkley Publishing / Penguin Random House for this copy in return for my honest review.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Jenn

    I read this book based on all of the reviews in the front pages, and they were not wrong. It was suspenseful, and it did keep me up reading late into the night.(I read the whole book in just a few hours) I was afraid it would be the type of story to leave me hanging on at the end, with some vague explanation of what happened and no real answers. I wasn't far off. Caitlin Stuart disappears one day while walking her dog, and the resulting story is told by her father, Tom.His wife, Abby, is going thr I read this book based on all of the reviews in the front pages, and they were not wrong. It was suspenseful, and it did keep me up reading late into the night.(I read the whole book in just a few hours) I was afraid it would be the type of story to leave me hanging on at the end, with some vague explanation of what happened and no real answers. I wasn't far off. Caitlin Stuart disappears one day while walking her dog, and the resulting story is told by her father, Tom.His wife, Abby, is going through her own grieving process and they are growing apart. ~~~~~~spoilers~~~~~ Unexpectedly, new information comes in about Caitlin, and that she may still be alive. Caitlin does eventually appear, but she is not the same girl who disappeared 4 years earlier. She does not want to discuss where she's been or what has happened. Little by little, the details emerge. She was kidnapped and held by a man she now claims to "love". She was told that her parents didn't want her anymore. She was raped. And this man had done this to other girls before Caitlin. The story goes in 8 different directions at this point. Abby,Tom's brother,the victim advocates,the cops-everyone has an agenda. And at the bottom of it all is Caitlin who wants more than anything to return to her captor and go back to her "life" with him. I was frustrated at the ending , and the lack of details. I guess I wanted more of an explanation. What did happen to make her want to stay with her kidnapper? How did he brainwash her like that? What happens now? I did leave this book with a bit of a dirty,creeped out feeling, so I guess the author did his job. I just wish it was more than a grimier Jodi Picoult-esqe book.

  19. 5 out of 5

    ☕️Kimberly

    Cemetery Girl was an addictive novel, that kept me up till 3 in the morning to reach the conclusion. Bell weaves a believable tale of a parent’s worst nightmare. He delivers it with an authentic voice in Tom Stuart. Protagonist Tom Stuart, father of Caitlin and husband of Abby tells this riveting story from his perspective. The story is broken into three parts. The first part deals with events leading up to Caitlin’s disappearance. The second takes us through the aftermath and how it impacts them Cemetery Girl was an addictive novel, that kept me up till 3 in the morning to reach the conclusion. Bell weaves a believable tale of a parent’s worst nightmare. He delivers it with an authentic voice in Tom Stuart. Protagonist Tom Stuart, father of Caitlin and husband of Abby tells this riveting story from his perspective. The story is broken into three parts. The first part deals with events leading up to Caitlin’s disappearance. The second takes us through the aftermath and how it impacts them. In the third part of the book Caitlin returns, thin, dirty and silent. She is changed; gone is their beautiful vibrant daughter. This isn’t how they imagined her return, and Tom is still seeking answers. This story while fictional could be ripped from the headlines of any news paper. It gives us an in-depth look at the chilling horror of having your child abducted. Tom and Abby are flawed, both as humans and parents. I would be naïve to believe I was a perfect parent. I think we all question ourselves. Bell’s characters show us their raw emotions. They give voice to unspeakable thoughts making this all the more surreal. While this isn’t a Stephen King novel, the tale is so real, so horrible that you will find yourselves checking on your kids in the middle of night. Cemetery Girl will leave its mark on the reader. The next headline of a child’s abduction will draw you back in and make you think about the unthinkable. I will unquestionably be reading more of David J Bell’s work. This review was originally posted at Caffeinated Book Reviewer

  20. 4 out of 5

    Holly Robinson

    Truthfully, I expected to love this book, because of other reviews and because it's in a genre I love to read as an escape: psychological thriller, parents embroiled in a mystery, missing child, etc. All the right elements for a thrilling, quick read, and indeed, this is a quick read--I finished it in a few hours--but that's part of the problem with it. The story line is fascinating, but the author uses extremely plain language, very little imagery, and every one of the characters is so dislikea Truthfully, I expected to love this book, because of other reviews and because it's in a genre I love to read as an escape: psychological thriller, parents embroiled in a mystery, missing child, etc. All the right elements for a thrilling, quick read, and indeed, this is a quick read--I finished it in a few hours--but that's part of the problem with it. The story line is fascinating, but the author uses extremely plain language, very little imagery, and every one of the characters is so dislikeable that, especially during the second half of the book, I honestly started to think I wouldn't trust any one of them. I realize the author was trying to do something darker than your average mystery, a bit noir-ish, but there are other writers who do this much better. For instance, check out Andrew Taylor's book, The Four Last Things, for a psychological thriller about a missing child, with even creepier villains and religious imagery, for a much lusher, deeper read of the same sort. However, having said that, I would still say this is a good read, and I liked it enough to get Bell's second novel, The Hiding Place, where he definitely shows us his growth as a writer, handling characters on a much deeper level while maintaining the same tightly suspenseful narrative. I'm sure I'll read his next book, too.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Christina Dudley

    For some reason I put this on hold thinking it was a ghost story, but actually it's about a dad dealing with the disappearance of his daughter four years earlier. I was turning the pages but decided to jump ship for a couple reasons: 1. His wife gets really into some church with the usual unlikeable church pastor. Pretty tired of running across these stereotypes--or am I the only person who goes to church with lots of cool, likeable, genuine people? 2. Bizarre sentences were sprinkled throughout t For some reason I put this on hold thinking it was a ghost story, but actually it's about a dad dealing with the disappearance of his daughter four years earlier. I was turning the pages but decided to jump ship for a couple reasons: 1. His wife gets really into some church with the usual unlikeable church pastor. Pretty tired of running across these stereotypes--or am I the only person who goes to church with lots of cool, likeable, genuine people? 2. Bizarre sentences were sprinkled throughout that drive me crazy. Ex 1: "She took a deep, sniffling inhalation of air." As opposed to what--deep, sniffling inhalations of cocaine? Is there anything else on earth we are regularly breathing? And what's wrong with the word "breath"? Why "inhalation"? Ex 2: "--Every leaf, every scrap of paper, every grass clipping--took to the air and swirled around me until I felt as though I were standing in one of those Christmas snow globes, the kind that when shaken produce the kinetic spinning of a blizzard.". Okay--are there snow globes that DON'T do that?? What's a Christmas snow globe, in particular? What is "kinetic" spinning? Isn't spinning already a motion? Do you mean moving motion? And so on. All that said, many readers enjoyed the book, and the 30% I read zipped by.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Traci

    I read up on the reviews before ordering this book and it sounded pretty solid, words such as page turner, thriller, unimaginable ending, couldn't put it down... I titled this Confused because I honestly don't know how any avid reader could have attached those descriptors to this novel. I trudged through this book and mainly kept motivated by the review of this stellar ending. Good god was I disappointed I didn't put this book down sooner. Lack of character development: the father comes across a I read up on the reviews before ordering this book and it sounded pretty solid, words such as page turner, thriller, unimaginable ending, couldn't put it down... I titled this Confused because I honestly don't know how any avid reader could have attached those descriptors to this novel. I trudged through this book and mainly kept motivated by the review of this stellar ending. Good god was I disappointed I didn't put this book down sooner. Lack of character development: the father comes across as a troglodyte that appears to have no emotional intelligence or ability to critically think, the mother a shell of a female character and so on. No emotional depth, surface level without a moment of transcending into their world... it keeps you at arms length and continually goads you into turning the page for possibly one ounce of relevant, good dialogue or development of plot, only to be let down.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Amy "the book-bat"

    I was disappointed in this book. After reading the description and the blurbs on the back of the book, it really sounded like something I would like. Reading the actual story, on the other hand, made me feel like something was missing. It never grabbed me in the way a "thriller" is supposed to. I found no thrills at all. What I did find was a bunch of characters I didn't like and a pace so slow it was painful. Several times I debated whether to even bother finishing. I would be ready to put the I was disappointed in this book. After reading the description and the blurbs on the back of the book, it really sounded like something I would like. Reading the actual story, on the other hand, made me feel like something was missing. It never grabbed me in the way a "thriller" is supposed to. I found no thrills at all. What I did find was a bunch of characters I didn't like and a pace so slow it was painful. Several times I debated whether to even bother finishing. I would be ready to put the book down and move on to something else, then something mildly interesting would happen and I would give it another chance in case it was about to pick up. The it would drop me without fail. By the time I was 200 pages in, I felt I had made the commitment and trudged my way through the rest of the book in hopes that the ending would be worth it... it wasn't.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Eve (Between The Bookends)

    This is the second book I have read by this author in the past week, and both have been fantastic. Abby and Tom's daughter Caitlin goes missing while walking their dog Frosty. Four years later she reappears and we get to see how a family deals with their child's disappearance and subsequent reappearance. There are some twists and turns, but I wouldn't say it was overly "mysterious" Overall though I really enjoy this one. This author has such effortless writing style which makes his books very re This is the second book I have read by this author in the past week, and both have been fantastic. Abby and Tom's daughter Caitlin goes missing while walking their dog Frosty. Four years later she reappears and we get to see how a family deals with their child's disappearance and subsequent reappearance. There are some twists and turns, but I wouldn't say it was overly "mysterious" Overall though I really enjoy this one. This author has such effortless writing style which makes his books very readable, and pulls you into the story from page one.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Sherri Thacker

    Just average for me.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Kaye

    Well, I am in a quandary as to this one. While I love suspense and thrillers and the first three-quarters of the book had me riveted to the pages just to see how the plot progressed, the last quarter of the book not so intriguing and I'm not sure exactly why. I think part of it is I didn't really like any of the characters. Oh, sure I could empathize with them but as to liking them, it was a no. At times they acted contrary to their character development at the beginning. Obviously, it's not nec Well, I am in a quandary as to this one. While I love suspense and thrillers and the first three-quarters of the book had me riveted to the pages just to see how the plot progressed, the last quarter of the book not so intriguing and I'm not sure exactly why. I think part of it is I didn't really like any of the characters. Oh, sure I could empathize with them but as to liking them, it was a no. At times they acted contrary to their character development at the beginning. Obviously, it's not necessary to like every character but there has to be at least one you can root for. I didn't find that in this book. Tom and Abby were going in two different directions after Caitlin went missing. Even though Tom was fanatical in his efforts to find out what happened, towards the end I found some of his actions and thoughts hard to figure out. At times he struck me as entirely self-centered. Abby seemed convinced Caitlin was not coming back so she turned to her church and Pastor Chris. She had a large monument made and held a memorial service and then said she had "moved on". Hmmmmm . . how does a mother even do that? Needless to say, this had a terrible effect on their marriage. Caitlin, I didn't like as a sly, lying little six-year old and I still didn't like her when she was returned to her parents as a foul-mouthed, belligerent teen. At first, she was all over Abby while saying she would not talk about the last four years as they didn't know what "happened to her". Sounds like the ordeal was horrible, doesn't it? But, the next thing you know she is sneaking out a window to return to her captor who she says she loves. Which is it, Caitlin? Tom's brother, Buster, was another unlikeable character; too brash, crass and a little too creepy in his attention to Caitlin. Actually, Buster made my skin crawl. At several points Tom remembers when Buster would shelter him from an abusive step-father which gives the impression he was a caring older brother but later in the story certain rumors come to light which belie this. At one point he's beating Tom to a pulp and then turns around to help him the next day leaving me to think he's an unreliable character. I don't want to give specifics because it would include spoilers. The unsatisfactory ending left too many unanswered questions for me. A 3* rating to me is I liked the book and it was over all a pleasurable reading experience; 2 is "meh" could take it or leave it. Unfortunately, I think this one falls somewhere in the middle. Of course, this is just my take on the book, you may love it.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Christie

    I read the first 192 pages of David Bell’s novel Cemetery Girl lickety split. I couldn’t put the book down. I wondered – how come I’ve never heard of this book or this author? How come the only positive promotion is from other authors? Where has this author been all my life? And then it all went to hell in a hand basket. Cemetery Girl is the story of college professor Tom Stuart and his wife, Abby, and their daughter, Caitlin, who disappeared four years ago when she was twelve. Now, Abby has dec I read the first 192 pages of David Bell’s novel Cemetery Girl lickety split. I couldn’t put the book down. I wondered – how come I’ve never heard of this book or this author? How come the only positive promotion is from other authors? Where has this author been all my life? And then it all went to hell in a hand basket. Cemetery Girl is the story of college professor Tom Stuart and his wife, Abby, and their daughter, Caitlin, who disappeared four years ago when she was twelve. Now, Abby has decided it’s time to say goodbye to Caitlin and has organized a memorial service for her daughter. It’s caused something of a rift between Tom and Abby because Tom hasn’t given up hope that his daughter will come home to them because her body has never been found. But Tom and Abby’s marriage is on the slippery slope anyway. Abby has found religion and is spending more and more time with Pastor Chris her new ‘best friend.’ Yeah, right. For the first half of the book I was totally invested in Tom’s story and the novel’s attempt to make him a somewhat unreliable narrator. For example, he and his half-brother, Buster, have different takes on their childhood. Tom remembers his step-father, Paul, as a mean and abusive drunk; Buster claims it wasn’t like that at all. There are a bunch of minor characters in the novel – Detective Ryan, the one and only cop still assigned to Caitlin’s case; Susan Goff, a volunteer with the police department (who is not a therapist or professional counsellor, just someone to talk to); Liann Stipes, a lawyer whose own daughter had been murdered and who has acted as an advisor to Tom; Tracy Fairlawn, a stripper who claims she saw Caitlin. Then there’s this mysterious blonde girl who keeps appearing near Caitlin’s tombstone or outside the Stuart house in the middle of the night. Like I said, Bell kept me turning those pages for quite a long time. Then I just didn’t believe it anymore. I didn’t believe the way characters started to speak to each other. I didn’t believe the resolution of the book’s central mystery. I didn’t believe any of Tom’s interactions with anyone – they just all felt artificial. I’m a parent; I wouldn’t behave this way. Cemetery Girl had a lot of potential, but a book like this depends on credibility and at the end of the day – it just didn’t have any.

  28. 4 out of 5

    JeanBookNerd

    David Bell’s thriller debut, Cemetery Girl, is the story of the disappearance of 12 year old Caitlin Stuart and how her parents, Tom and Abby, coped with her being gone. Bell starts the story four years earlier after Caitlin’s disappearance. Frantic and besieged, Tom vowed to never give up the hope that she is still alive and will come back home. However, Abby has given up and decides it is time to move on. She planned a memorial service and ordered a headstone as she felt the marriage ended whe David Bell’s thriller debut, Cemetery Girl, is the story of the disappearance of 12 year old Caitlin Stuart and how her parents, Tom and Abby, coped with her being gone. Bell starts the story four years earlier after Caitlin’s disappearance. Frantic and besieged, Tom vowed to never give up the hope that she is still alive and will come back home. However, Abby has given up and decides it is time to move on. She planned a memorial service and ordered a headstone as she felt the marriage ended when Caitlin disappeared. When Caitlin was found alive, she does not discuss the details of the events leading up to her disappearance and anything in between. Happy that his daughter has returned home safe, Tom is now on a mission to learn about her disappearance. The book is told from the perspective of Tom, which Bell did an excellent job getting the readers intrigued and fulfilled. His writing style made a sensitive issue easy to comprehend. The aftermath of Caitlin’s disappearance tested the marriage of Tom and Abby and Bell’s efforts to describe the different aspects and reactions of people were fantastically written. Cemetery Girl is a riveting and powerful novel, maintaining the reader on their toes until the end. Mesmerizing and full with torment, this captivating story shows to be a page-turner. It is a forceful ride, coiling through psychological territory and pulling the reader into emotional suffering. It is worth the read as the book is truly thought-aggravating.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Brian

    This is one of those books that SOUND really good, but end up being really awful. The premise is about a girl who goes missing, which is not a new idea, but she mysteriously reappears and refuses to talk about what happened to her. My issues were that the characters were neither developed, nor likeable. This was a thriller that moves along purely by plot, not by character motivations. The dialogue was clunky and hard to believe. The "twists" were hardly interesting, and by the end of the book, I This is one of those books that SOUND really good, but end up being really awful. The premise is about a girl who goes missing, which is not a new idea, but she mysteriously reappears and refuses to talk about what happened to her. My issues were that the characters were neither developed, nor likeable. This was a thriller that moves along purely by plot, not by character motivations. The dialogue was clunky and hard to believe. The "twists" were hardly interesting, and by the end of the book, I just wanted it to end. This was a very quick read, and I would recommend reading it on a plane or at the beach and "forgetting it" in the seat back, or at the airport terminal, or even better yet, leave it buried in the sand.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Tracey Allen at Carpe Librum

    Cemetery Girl opens with Caitlin's father Tom explaining that his daugher disappeared four years ago at the tender age of twelve. He goes on to recount a day when she was just six, and lied directly to his face, without so much as a twitch or expression of guilt. Tom wonders about the circumstances of Caitlin's disappearance six years later and wonders if she could have run away. Tom's wife Abby believes her daughter is dead and makes arrangements to hold a memorial in her memory. Their daughter Cemetery Girl opens with Caitlin's father Tom explaining that his daugher disappeared four years ago at the tender age of twelve. He goes on to recount a day when she was just six, and lied directly to his face, without so much as a twitch or expression of guilt. Tom wonders about the circumstances of Caitlin's disappearance six years later and wonders if she could have run away. Tom's wife Abby believes her daughter is dead and makes arrangements to hold a memorial in her memory. Their daughter's disappearance has devastated their marriage, with Abby seeking solace in her church. It is at this time, that Caitlin is found dirty and dishevelled, walking beside a deserted road and taken swiftly to hospital. The majority of Cemetery Girl is around Caitlin's return and Tom trying to find out where she's been for the past 4 years. The reaction of her parents couldn't be more different and as a reader it made for interesting reading. What made this book even more fascinating for me was the recent case in America of Ariel Castro's abduction of Amanda Berry, Gina DeJesus and Michelle Knight. In finding out about Caitlin, I was also thinking of these three women in real life and searching for answers. Unfortunately I found that while the pace and suspense was great throughout the novel, the ending was somewhat of a let down for me.

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