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A Suppressed Cry: The Short Life of a Victorian Daughter: Life and Death of a Quaker Daughter (Virago classic non-fiction)

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42 review for A Suppressed Cry: The Short Life of a Victorian Daughter: Life and Death of a Quaker Daughter (Virago classic non-fiction)

  1. 5 out of 5

    Lucinda

    This is Victoria Glendinning's first book, written in her back bedroom when she had young children. She wrote the introduction to this 1995 Virago edition nearly 30 years on, as an acclaimed and highly accomplished writer. The contrast in writing style and confidence is really interesting. A suppressed cry tells the story of the short and tragic life of Winnie Seebohm, an ancestor of Gleninning's. Winnie lived in the late 19th century and was a very bright young woman, of middle class background This is Victoria Glendinning's first book, written in her back bedroom when she had young children. She wrote the introduction to this 1995 Virago edition nearly 30 years on, as an acclaimed and highly accomplished writer. The contrast in writing style and confidence is really interesting. A suppressed cry tells the story of the short and tragic life of Winnie Seebohm, an ancestor of Gleninning's. Winnie lived in the late 19th century and was a very bright young woman, of middle class background who longed to live a useful and productive life, rather the life of boredom and hypochondriasis many women of her class endured. Yet she was dutiful and firmly rooted in her family. (view spoiler)[ She attended Newnham College, Cambridge but suffered terribly with brittle asthma, which killed her at the age of 22. This was almost certainly exacerbated by her immense anxiety about leaving the family and succeeding at Cambridge. As Glendinning says in her introduction, with more research, more years behind her and a more modern understanding of the pathophysiology of asthma, this could have been a different book. It is a poignant story of a small and ordinary life, which I found most interesting and revealing. As Glendinning writes in her opening paragraph: "Do not be misled into thinking that because it is history it has nothing to do with you. 1885 is yesterday. It is probably tomorrow too." (hide spoiler)]

  2. 4 out of 5

    Sally

    First published in 1969, this is the account of the life of one of the author's ancestors. As member of a loving, well-off, academic Quaker family in Hertfordshire at the turn of the century, Winnie Seebohm seems to have had an idyllic life. But the author argues that she was kept back by her parents - a relationship (there are almost no details) seems to have been firmly quashed; and while Winnie was permitted some blissful months studying at Newnham College, she pretty soon was forced back hom First published in 1969, this is the account of the life of one of the author's ancestors. As member of a loving, well-off, academic Quaker family in Hertfordshire at the turn of the century, Winnie Seebohm seems to have had an idyllic life. But the author argues that she was kept back by her parents - a relationship (there are almost no details) seems to have been firmly quashed; and while Winnie was permitted some blissful months studying at Newnham College, she pretty soon was forced back home through severe asthma which led to an early death. Ms Glendinning argues that this is a psychosomatic illness, brought on through tension - and certainly the siblings generally were discouraged from matrimony, and one ultimately ended up in an asylum. Quite an interesting narrative, though difficult to come to any positive conclusions - if she was seriously ill, perhaps marriage WOULD have been unwise. Can we confidently attribute the illness to family pressures? Certainly there were often unspoken difficulties for Winnie, as the author juxtaposes determinedly cheery letters to her former classmates at Cambridge with diary entries of same day, which show her focussing on bearing with the sufferings she has been dealt.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Ali

    Very interesting, short, biography of a young woman's fight (against poor health and the times) to attend Newnham College, Cambridge, in the early years of women's University education in the UK. Very interesting, short, biography of a young woman's fight (against poor health and the times) to attend Newnham College, Cambridge, in the early years of women's University education in the UK.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Barbara

    Very interesting from the perspective of a young, intelligent, upper middle class woman of the 1880s- not many options available to them...

  5. 4 out of 5

    Liz Muir

    A sad tale of a young woman hemmed in by social norms of her day. And a reminder that female oppression, in different forms, still exists.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Gillian

  7. 5 out of 5

    Jo

  8. 4 out of 5

    Edna Quammie

  9. 5 out of 5

    Caroline

  10. 5 out of 5

    Amanda Rumble

  11. 5 out of 5

    Molly Carr

  12. 5 out of 5

    Lynn Findlay

  13. 5 out of 5

    Alison Bowman

  14. 4 out of 5

    Mark Wallace

  15. 5 out of 5

    Elizabeth Shaw

  16. 4 out of 5

    The Book Maven

  17. 5 out of 5

    Simmy allen

  18. 5 out of 5

    Sandra Lawson

  19. 5 out of 5

    Alison Osborne

  20. 4 out of 5

    Charlotte

  21. 5 out of 5

    Mr Christopher Filor

  22. 4 out of 5

    Hannah Salt

  23. 5 out of 5

    Isabelle

  24. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer Stewart

  25. 4 out of 5

    Chloe Lee

  26. 4 out of 5

    Mary Alice

  27. 5 out of 5

    Amy B.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Moira Russell

  29. 5 out of 5

    Sal

  30. 5 out of 5

    Liz Muir

  31. 4 out of 5

    Renee Elmer

  32. 4 out of 5

    Paulette Gacke

  33. 4 out of 5

    Marmalade0687gmail.com

  34. 5 out of 5

    Lyndsey Jenkins

  35. 5 out of 5

    Sheila Khatun

  36. 5 out of 5

    Angela Hope

  37. 4 out of 5

    Lisa

  38. 4 out of 5

    Fiona MacDonald

  39. 5 out of 5

    HertsPuffin

  40. 5 out of 5

    Camille

  41. 4 out of 5

    Petra Roelfzema

  42. 4 out of 5

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