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Karma, Havok, Polaris, and Dazzler become a part of a new class of mutants selected by the President of the United States and the mysterious Emma Frost after the President decides that Professor Charles Xavier is becoming a problem. Collecting: Ultimate X-Men 40-45


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Karma, Havok, Polaris, and Dazzler become a part of a new class of mutants selected by the President of the United States and the mysterious Emma Frost after the President decides that Professor Charles Xavier is becoming a problem. Collecting: Ultimate X-Men 40-45

30 review for Ultimate X-Men, Vol. 8: New Mutants

  1. 5 out of 5

    Bookwraiths

    Another great story arc with a good mixture of poignant moments, exciting fights, and interpersonal relationships. Art is still amazing as well.

  2. 5 out of 5

    James DeSantis

    Bendis keeps the momentum going with another really good volume for Ultimate X-Men. This time we have Emma frost enter the picture. FAR different from the version we got in the regular 616, this one wants so start her own club of Mutants, but more for peace than fighting. Beast is all trying to figure out what to do with his life. Wolverine is dealing with more internal issues as always. And Angel comes on the scene, and him and Storm have a special bond right from the get-go. Oh also there is a Bendis keeps the momentum going with another really good volume for Ultimate X-Men. This time we have Emma frost enter the picture. FAR different from the version we got in the regular 616, this one wants so start her own club of Mutants, but more for peace than fighting. Beast is all trying to figure out what to do with his life. Wolverine is dealing with more internal issues as always. And Angel comes on the scene, and him and Storm have a special bond right from the get-go. Oh also there is a issue where Wolverine has to some some shady shit to protect mutants and it's amazing with a lot of emotion. Overall, this is a really solid volume. I really loved the intimate moments with the characters. Especially storm and Angel, or beast and Xavier, Cyclops and Jean and so on. All worked well together. Also some big plot progression with major deaths happening in this volume. I think Bendis on this title did wonders, sad he's leaving next volume, but he did well here. A 4 out of 5.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Samantha

    Other than Archie Comics this was my first experience of a graphic novel and it occurred rather recently. After reading this I felt I had been missing out since I enjoyed the experience so much but instead of pouting over years I could have been read graphic novels I can celebrate having discovered new and fun material to explore. This was also my first taste and experience with the X-Men mythology. Needless to say I would like to read more. I found comfort and relevance from this story. More an Other than Archie Comics this was my first experience of a graphic novel and it occurred rather recently. After reading this I felt I had been missing out since I enjoyed the experience so much but instead of pouting over years I could have been read graphic novels I can celebrate having discovered new and fun material to explore. This was also my first taste and experience with the X-Men mythology. Needless to say I would like to read more. I found comfort and relevance from this story. More and more mutants are arising with new and different powers talents and gifts. The president attempts to blend the mutants with the general public to create peace and harmony amongst all the people for there is much racism or mutantism from the general public towards the mutants and visa versa but the attempt was not carried out and failed rather miserably which was rather disappointing. The story didn't end there I just don't have the next book in the series. :-)

  4. 5 out of 5

    Sesana

    This is the first volume of Ultimate X-Men, by any writer, that I would call great. It's the best, tightest, and most interesting story yet, which probably couldn't be done in the 616 universe, and it builds off everything that has gone before. Remember how the X-Men have basically become the official mutant foot soldiers of the US government? Yeah, not a popular move. The official response is to set up a separate, vaguely competing team, with vague goals that are aimed more towards education in This is the first volume of Ultimate X-Men, by any writer, that I would call great. It's the best, tightest, and most interesting story yet, which probably couldn't be done in the 616 universe, and it builds off everything that has gone before. Remember how the X-Men have basically become the official mutant foot soldiers of the US government? Yeah, not a popular move. The official response is to set up a separate, vaguely competing team, with vague goals that are aimed more towards education in some way and less towards combat. That it isn't explicitly laid out exactly how this team will be different from Xavier's doesn't really matter, because the unofficial response is much more deadly. There's a sense that much of what's gone before has built to this point, though it obviously hasn't been. It's simply a fitting direction to take the book, with some very high stakes and the sort of big changes that really could only be done in the Ultimate universe.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Jason

    Great plot. Once again Bendis delivers wonderful action with great character work. Half a chapter was a simple conversation between Storm and Angel about being mutants and the burdens that brought. These small character moments were often too small or glossed over in prior volumes and it is nice to see the new creative team unafraid to slow down the plot to remind readers of the stakes.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Ekenedilichukwu Ikegwuani

    i like that this takes the series in a brand new direction. everything was going too well for the team for awhile but this opens up new possibilities

  7. 5 out of 5

    Athena

    Inside this volume is Issue 41. A story to rival any sad-goth-arm-cutting-teenage-angst. Everything the main character is around is destroyed, literally. Damn rogue mutant powers. There is no happy ending, this is not a bildungsroman. He dies. And he is brave about it. His is just a side story, aren't we all though. *sighs* In this little drama we see the ruthlessness it takes for the greater whole to survive. We also witness the inner darkness that must exist inside Wolverine to have dedicated Inside this volume is Issue 41. A story to rival any sad-goth-arm-cutting-teenage-angst. Everything the main character is around is destroyed, literally. Damn rogue mutant powers. There is no happy ending, this is not a bildungsroman. He dies. And he is brave about it. His is just a side story, aren't we all though. *sighs* In this little drama we see the ruthlessness it takes for the greater whole to survive. We also witness the inner darkness that must exist inside Wolverine to have dedicated himself so fully as a soldier in his war that he must kill children.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Angel

    See my blog note on it: http://gypsylibrarian.blogspot.com/20... See my blog note on it: http://gypsylibrarian.blogspot.com/20...

  9. 4 out of 5

    Jedhua

    Book Info: This collection contains Ultimate X-Men issues #40-45. ABSOLUTE RATING: {3/5 stars} STANDARDIZED RATING: <3/5 stars> As the title would imply, this volume of Ultimate X-Men introduces some new mutants into mix, including Angel, Dazzler, and Polaris, among others. Here, Bendis sets out to tackle some serious philosophical questions, as well as examine the political and social climate surrounding the existence of mutants. Emotionally, the X-Men go through a lot in this book, and Bendis Book Info: This collection contains Ultimate X-Men issues #40-45. ABSOLUTE RATING: {3/5 stars} STANDARDIZED RATING: <3/5 stars> As the title would imply, this volume of Ultimate X-Men introduces some new mutants into mix, including Angel, Dazzler, and Polaris, among others. Here, Bendis sets out to tackle some serious philosophical questions, as well as examine the political and social climate surrounding the existence of mutants. Emotionally, the X-Men go through a lot in this book, and Bendis takes the opportunity to try and develop them and their personal struggles. Honestly though, I've seen him do better characterization (and deeper, more meaningful writing), and it didn't seem as if he was really putting his heart into his work. In terms of the page count, Bendis appears to have omitted an issue's worth of material (i.e. about 24 pages) from this volume, which may have made it more difficult for him to accomplish what he set out to. But ironically enough, even though it was the final two issues that cut corners the most – both by reducing page count and including several pages with almost no dialogue – they were two of the most enjoyable ones. The last of the strongest issues was #41, which, from what I can tell, most people saw to be the clear highlight of the book. While I might (somewhat) agree with that evaluation, I did feel like it was at times clumsily written and slightly tedious, so it fell short of achieving maximum emotional impact. (This point is further discussed in the postscript below.) Postscript: (view spoiler)[Up until page 11 of issue #41, things were going great. My main concern comes with the exchange the nameless mutant kid had with Logan. When Logan first enters the dark cave to talk, the kid screams: "You're gonna die if you don't get outta here!!" This seems to indicate that he already knows (or at least strongly suspects) that he has been the direct cause of the deaths of his family and neighbors. But then Bendis goes right ahead and wastes much of the next two pages on the kid coming to terms with the fact that he's a mutant after Logan tells him so. First off, it bothers me a little that the kid hadn't already considered that possibility. But even if he was too distraught to draw that conclusion, I would think it would be the least of his problems, so I don't get why he was so devastated to hear that. Besides, and in light of what I've said, I hope you would agree that there are far better ways to utilize these two pages. Since the kid would understandably be overwhelmed by recent events, I think maybe Logan should have been the one to do almost all of the talking. And his statements should have been more philosophical and heartfelt – perhaps said in the context of his own personal feelings about living with the painful knowledge that he himself has been the cause of death and suffering to many others through the years. This would have made it so that, by the end, readers would have better appreciated the personal toll it took on Logan, and walked away with a deeper insight into his character. In my opinion, Bendis wasted far too much precious time being characteristically redundant, and included too many silent panels which he probably thought would add a necessary dramatic edge. One of the few things this second half did well – and it's a subtle point – was that it brought up interesting questions about why exactly Logan was really there in that cave, and how he found the kid. Because if you know anything about Charles Xavier, you know that he would be extremely unlikely to have ordered and/or authorized such a brutal method to handle a burgeoning young mutant. I guess it's possible Jean Grey could have used Cerebro to find the kid, but I don't see her hiding that from the Professor, and I don't get why Logan would bother to tell the kid it was Xavier. Although all this is explained in the very next issue, I didn't see the emotional fallout of this act on Logan's psyche, which was particularly unsatisfying since Bendis and Hitch didn't show much discomfort when or while the act was being taken. See below for my comments concerning a few specific pages/panels: ["Get outta town?" Really, Bendis? *That's* what you're going to write for a kid so profoundly shocked and devastated by what he had done? Horrible word choice, plain and simple.] [(Page one of two showing the kid's realization that he's a mutant.) Essentially, Logan had to verify *three* times (via simple cut-and-paste, one word panels) after initially telling the boy what he really was.] [(Page two of two showing the kid's realization that he's a mutant.) "All I do is kill? My mutant power is I kill everything around me? That's what I do? I kill?" Once or twice probably would have done it, don'tcha think?] [The biggest "loser?" Why "loser?" What the fuck does *that* have do with anything? Why not "killer" or "murderer?" More awkward writing, it seems...] [(This page comes right after the one where the kid says that he "can't live with [what he had done]," which is the image right before the previous one.) This was, by far, the best use of semi-silent panels in the whole issue. In fact, it was quite impressive by any comic's standards. I thought it to be a very clever way of darkly implying what Logan was there to do, without spoiling the moment by explicitly saying it.] (hide spoiler)]

  10. 4 out of 5

    Nate

    Bendis takes over this series and is really Bendis at his best here. The few pages Dazzler has is the type of iconic reboot that I wish there were more of in the ultimate universe and managed to side step the character's disco and roller skates history while still paying tribute to her majestic first appearance a lifetime ago during the Dark Phoenix Saga. On the whole this was a pleasant surprise right from the title where I thought New Mutants was going to be the integration of those early Clar Bendis takes over this series and is really Bendis at his best here. The few pages Dazzler has is the type of iconic reboot that I wish there were more of in the ultimate universe and managed to side step the character's disco and roller skates history while still paying tribute to her majestic first appearance a lifetime ago during the Dark Phoenix Saga. On the whole this was a pleasant surprise right from the title where I thought New Mutants was going to be the integration of those early Claremont characters but what we get instead is an interesting mix of old and new that takes the series in a whole new direction. Additionally, the stand alone Wolverine story half way through the collection is probably the best and most touchingly tragic issue in the series thus far.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Brian Rosenberger

    This arc introduces 17 yr old Warren Worthington to the Ultimates universe, who proves to be very popular with Kitty and Storm. He arrives at the school no shirts, no shoes, but all blonde beefcake. Issue 41. Next a standalone story involving Wolverine and a new mutant whose powers are just now manifesting. Great story. Bleak ending. Buy the trade for this story alone. The US President, due to the above story, has concerns with mutants. Enter Emma Frost and her “New Mutants,” consisting of Dazzler This arc introduces 17 yr old Warren Worthington to the Ultimates universe, who proves to be very popular with Kitty and Storm. He arrives at the school no shirts, no shoes, but all blonde beefcake. Issue 41. Next a standalone story involving Wolverine and a new mutant whose powers are just now manifesting. Great story. Bleak ending. Buy the trade for this story alone. The US President, due to the above story, has concerns with mutants. Enter Emma Frost and her “New Mutants,” consisting of Dazzler, Karma, Havok, and Polaris. Dazzler I found to be the most interesting in contrast to her 616 counterpart. Enter a Sentinel. Enter a surprise death. So ends the arc. To be continued.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Jim

    Perhaps not the strongest in the series, more like a bridge perhaps to other stories. I had to wait forever to get a copy, as this volume was oddly absent from the libraries and comic stores. Still, I like the art and the story wasn't bad, just seemed to meander a bit. I do sometimes get tired of the constant shifts of allegiance. The Beast is so much younger and unsure of himself in these tellings than the movie versions. and, sadly, this week the world lost Stan Lee. RIP. Perhaps not the strongest in the series, more like a bridge perhaps to other stories. I had to wait forever to get a copy, as this volume was oddly absent from the libraries and comic stores. Still, I like the art and the story wasn't bad, just seemed to meander a bit. I do sometimes get tired of the constant shifts of allegiance. The Beast is so much younger and unsure of himself in these tellings than the movie versions. and, sadly, this week the world lost Stan Lee. RIP.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Noah

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. What a wonderful mess of events. The characters keep getting more interesting, and their relationships are constantly being tested. Some scenes had me going "no way they just did that", and the visualizations are simple to piece together as a moving picture. Despite losing members, new members seem to keep the series fresh, and I'm excited to see them working together, hopefully with resolved alliances and romantic relationships. What a wonderful mess of events. The characters keep getting more interesting, and their relationships are constantly being tested. Some scenes had me going "no way they just did that", and the visualizations are simple to piece together as a moving picture. Despite losing members, new members seem to keep the series fresh, and I'm excited to see them working together, hopefully with resolved alliances and romantic relationships.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Marloges

    The only Ultimate X-Men volume written by Bendis. I really enjoyed this one! There are quite a few new Mutants that got introduced, the storyline with Emma Frost made a lot of sense and the ending really hit the mark. My personal highlights were probably the appearance of Angel and the second chapter, which was a self-contained side-story with a very messed up ending... One of the most emotional X-Men chapters I've read. Great stuff. The only Ultimate X-Men volume written by Bendis. I really enjoyed this one! There are quite a few new Mutants that got introduced, the storyline with Emma Frost made a lot of sense and the ending really hit the mark. My personal highlights were probably the appearance of Angel and the second chapter, which was a self-contained side-story with a very messed up ending... One of the most emotional X-Men chapters I've read. Great stuff.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Adam Stone

    This is one of the wonkiest comics that I've given four stars to. Its inconsistent, and has a few eye rolling moments. But the issue featuring Wolverine is excellent, and Bendis does a marvelous job of weaving together several strands of Millar's run. If you're looking for a sad X-book that doesn't feel emotionally manipulative or Completely Out Of The Blue, this is a great volume to pick up. This is one of the wonkiest comics that I've given four stars to. Its inconsistent, and has a few eye rolling moments. But the issue featuring Wolverine is excellent, and Bendis does a marvelous job of weaving together several strands of Millar's run. If you're looking for a sad X-book that doesn't feel emotionally manipulative or Completely Out Of The Blue, this is a great volume to pick up.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Adam

    Though I'm reading these slower due to time constraints I'm still very much enjoying this series. Continues to be solid writing/dialogue and great artwork. I also enjoy the various complicated social themes they bring up and the multiple ways they convey them (with storytelling, artwork, etc.). A great series that I'm happy to continue reading! Though I'm reading these slower due to time constraints I'm still very much enjoying this series. Continues to be solid writing/dialogue and great artwork. I also enjoy the various complicated social themes they bring up and the multiple ways they convey them (with storytelling, artwork, etc.). A great series that I'm happy to continue reading!

  17. 5 out of 5

    Thomas Hetherington

    More of the same really...

  18. 5 out of 5

    Caleb Abel

    Another home run for Bendis. One of the darkest and best single issues of X-Men I've ever read right in the middle too. Another home run for Bendis. One of the darkest and best single issues of X-Men I've ever read right in the middle too.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Nancy

    I just finished it for the same week and i really enjoyed it. I loved how at first the storylines didn't seem to have anything to do with each other but slowly details were revealed to show how they are all connected. I just finished it for the same week and i really enjoyed it. I loved how at first the storylines didn't seem to have anything to do with each other but slowly details were revealed to show how they are all connected.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Molly

    The writing is perfectly serviceable, though without any distinguishing characteristics. It's like those MFA bores all are. The writing is perfectly serviceable, though without any distinguishing characteristics. It's like those MFA bores all are.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Charles

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Stuff I Read – Ultimate X-Men #40-45 So I guess it makes sense that I have liked this series sense the end of Return of the King, because, though I didn’t notice it at first, the series has changed hands in the writing department. I don’t mean that I didn’t notice a change in tone and message, because I have. But I didn’t notice at first that Bendis has taken over from Millar. And, I have to say, Bendis does his best to redeem the series and the cast. Whereas Millar showed the X-Men as the Tomorr Stuff I Read – Ultimate X-Men #40-45 So I guess it makes sense that I have liked this series sense the end of Return of the King, because, though I didn’t notice it at first, the series has changed hands in the writing department. I don’t mean that I didn’t notice a change in tone and message, because I have. But I didn’t notice at first that Bendis has taken over from Millar. And, I have to say, Bendis does his best to redeem the series and the cast. Whereas Millar showed the X-Men as the Tomorrow People, as something futuristic and better, Bendis shows mutants as just people, as being flawed but trying to make a better world. They are not nearly so arrogant or blind or, at least, these flaws are not glorified or made better by their inherent betterness. This is a little jarring, or perhaps a little unbelievable, at times because Millar set up his characters, and especially Xavier, as being very ruthless and abusive of his powers. I was caught by his rhetoric he spouted to Beast about how he wouldn’t meddle in his mind because I remember how he just made Iceman forget an entire evening of his life because he thought it best. I cannot imagine that if Millar were still writing this the President would not have been free of tampering. I mean, didn’t Xavier get in his head when everyone thought they saw Magneto killed? Isn’t that manipulating? I mean, I can understand the fear about the President being compromised, because it seems like it would be something Xavier would do. Indeed, the whole “this is all Xavier’s plan” thing that Xavier had going is more and more dropped by Bendis as he goes, and in this series he was surprised by Beast’s departure and by many of the events. If this was still Millar, at the end I would feel like Xavier had set this all up so that Frost and her students would stay with him at the Institute. But Bendis makes Xavier innocent and kind, much more like the original series, where he might think he knows what is best, but he is not going to make everyone do it without asking permission. That said, I think Bendis does an excellent job of trying to steer the X-Men back toward being heroes, and he does this by trying to argue that the reason the X-Men are using the tactics of violence and such is because they recognize that their enemies will not let them progress past that. Not yet, is the implication, and I rather agree with this. it is refreshing because Millar insisted that the Mutant way was better, but they always fell back on violence and, well, that was okay because they were mutants. But Bendis tries to harmonize the peaceful intentions with the violent outcomes without the X-Men and Xavier seeming like hypocrites. And while I still haven’t forgotten the first thirty-some issues, he does a good job at convincing me that in order to protect their ideals and their lives from enemies that resort to violence, that it is either a question of violating them mentally or meeting their violence and trying to have it do as little damage to everyone as possible. Which is more like the regular X-Men. And maybe that’s not the point, because this was supposed to be modern X-Men, but I don’t think that modern means insane. I like to think that the X-Men evolve with the times, and the direction Millar took them was a bit too much a try to say something about the present, and something I don’t agree with, to be truly effective. The X-Men stopped being heroes. But Bendis brings them back, and tries to wash away the hypocrisy and put in, instead, a feel that the X-Men are not above humans, but like Angel says quite explicitly, they are just normal people. So hurrah, a message I can get behind again. I don’t know if the series can ever really recover from Millar’s handling, but this arc was fun and didn’t offend me. So it comes in with an 8/10.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Rob McMonigal

    Brian Michael Bendis, the man who writes everything, takes over the X-Men for a bit with this story that tries to sort out what it means for the mutant population to be officially protected by the US government, something we've never seen in the original universe. In his wordy way, Bendis looks at this problem with a lot of speeches, and even has a character, Emma Frost, espouse that words are the way to solve the problem. (I can't help but see this as a tongue-in-cheek nod to the way his style Brian Michael Bendis, the man who writes everything, takes over the X-Men for a bit with this story that tries to sort out what it means for the mutant population to be officially protected by the US government, something we've never seen in the original universe. In his wordy way, Bendis looks at this problem with a lot of speeches, and even has a character, Emma Frost, espouse that words are the way to solve the problem. (I can't help but see this as a tongue-in-cheek nod to the way his style differs from Millar.) While Xavier tries to add more mutants to his arsenal even in the face of a notable defection, there are those who would sever ties with mutantkind, not preserve them. Things come to a head, and it's up to the uneasy alliance of Fury and Xavier to save the day. When the dust settles, no one is happy with the results. "What do we do next?" Scott asks. "I don't know," is Xavier's reply. Bendis has a very different approach to storytelling, and his love of crime and conspiracy that we see in New Avengers on a monthly basis is on display here as well. He does a lot of work in the shadows this time around. We don't get to see who's doing what until he's ready to reveal it, and even then I'm not sure we're seeing everything that's going on. Fury lives in the shadows and his increased prominence in the X-book will only lead them further down the path, as it's done in Ultimate Spider-Man. I also love the fact that Bendis gives us a Wolverine that's in better control of himself. The solo issue is one that only Bendis would show--a Logan completely in control of himself and knowing that this world isn't about black and white, it's about black and really, really black. He also fights better in the climax scene. Perhaps the biggest surprise is Bendis's handling of the new characters. Emma is rather quiet and only admits to her diamond form..I think the meekness is a front, personally. The Angel is a foppish rich boy, and Dazzler's a punker who cares about not much of anything but getting a record deal. BMB does a great job of keeping up the Millar tradition of taking some of the worst traits of our familiar heroes and bringing them out into the open. Now that the Ultimate line is at this point clearly not about making a more kid-friendly universe, Bendis gets to spread out a bit with his characterizations, and it works well. This is not your father's X-Men. There's agendas overlapping agendas and mutants who aren't quite as wholesome as they look. It's great fun, and I'm looking forward to seeing where all this goes. (Library, 12/07) Trebby's Take: Highly recommended!

  23. 4 out of 5

    Edward Cheer

    Well, that's it for the Bendis run. How very short. I enjoyed reading New Mutants. It was a fun addition to the X-Men, with the very clear purpose of adding more names out there from the original comics, so that the fanboy's appetite could be appropriately satiated. But it had some more good character growth here and there. Some memorable moments. It wasn't all good. I haven't read a flawless X-Men comic yet, but I'm still pleased to read decent ones. One particular comic that I still remember but Well, that's it for the Bendis run. How very short. I enjoyed reading New Mutants. It was a fun addition to the X-Men, with the very clear purpose of adding more names out there from the original comics, so that the fanboy's appetite could be appropriately satiated. But it had some more good character growth here and there. Some memorable moments. It wasn't all good. I haven't read a flawless X-Men comic yet, but I'm still pleased to read decent ones. One particular comic that I still remember but still bothers me is the one with the mutant with poison powers. Wolverine is personally sent to kill this child. Yes, he is killing people by accident, but is there no way to accommodate him? Hide him from the public eye? But, then the ethics of isolating an already mentally-stressed child come into play. It was very questionable, and I hope this is a set-up to more morally questionable dilemmas. I was also surprised for this big SPOILER... Beast dies. As in, potentially, he is permanently dead. Hopefully. But knowing how Marvel works. I'm sure we'll see his hand shoot out of the grave because he loves Storm so much or whatever. But I was surprised Bendis did that. Kind of makes you want more heroes to die in the MCU, so there can be some sort of- I don't know- tension? Or drama? I still enjoyed New Mutants. It's sad to see Bendis going right as he was starting, but he did decently. I am much more excited to see what Vaughan will do with the series next.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Andrew

    Volume 8 is yet another strong volume by Brian Michael Bendis and David Finch. This volume wraps up Bendis' run on the title and I have to say that it was a really refreshing and exciting story. No huge end of the world scenarios, just a lot of development in both story and character department. Don’t get me wrong, there was a rather climatic battle where the X-Men save the day, but nowhere on the scale of saving humanity from extinction as last seen in volume 6. I guess that’s the big differenc Volume 8 is yet another strong volume by Brian Michael Bendis and David Finch. This volume wraps up Bendis' run on the title and I have to say that it was a really refreshing and exciting story. No huge end of the world scenarios, just a lot of development in both story and character department. Don’t get me wrong, there was a rather climatic battle where the X-Men save the day, but nowhere on the scale of saving humanity from extinction as last seen in volume 6. I guess that’s the big difference in the writers. Bendis gives us a story instead of a movie.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Gerky

    This is the start of the Highpoint of Ultimate X-Men, where it becomes a more enjoyable, subtle (for an Ultimate Marvel book), character based book which will continue until Kirkman rears his head. Bendis continues his odd run by introducing Emma Frost and the New Mutants and doing a fairly decent job at it. Look , ultimately, this is a Bendis team book. lots of cast banter and interplay, not a huge amount of action, but it's well written. a different artist to Finch may have suited the book, ho This is the start of the Highpoint of Ultimate X-Men, where it becomes a more enjoyable, subtle (for an Ultimate Marvel book), character based book which will continue until Kirkman rears his head. Bendis continues his odd run by introducing Emma Frost and the New Mutants and doing a fairly decent job at it. Look , ultimately, this is a Bendis team book. lots of cast banter and interplay, not a huge amount of action, but it's well written. a different artist to Finch may have suited the book, however. It's not shiny and expressive enough being a little too dour.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Michael

    While I enjoy the concept for why Bendis brings in mutants like Emma Frost and Havok, I feel these characters could use a little more TLC. Emma is meant to be a tough minded, and tough skinned (pun intended) woman. Here, she's a confused kid with no direction. My favorite Havok narratives are from the Apocalypse narrative, and here, he doesn't even get to use his powers. Disappointing, but enjoyable, in the least. Bendis can write a line. While I enjoy the concept for why Bendis brings in mutants like Emma Frost and Havok, I feel these characters could use a little more TLC. Emma is meant to be a tough minded, and tough skinned (pun intended) woman. Here, she's a confused kid with no direction. My favorite Havok narratives are from the Apocalypse narrative, and here, he doesn't even get to use his powers. Disappointing, but enjoyable, in the least. Bendis can write a line.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Andrew Christman

    Bendis rights the sinking ship with his first run of Ultimate X-Men. I have to say, this is probably my favorite arc. Somehow, in 6 issues he introduces about as many characters as Millar had in his whole team AND manages to weave a pretty interesting political story. And for being an "edgy" comic writer, Millar didn't take the risk to pull such a daring finish to the arc. Don't want to spoil anything but it was just what Ultimate X-Men needed right now. Bendis rights the sinking ship with his first run of Ultimate X-Men. I have to say, this is probably my favorite arc. Somehow, in 6 issues he introduces about as many characters as Millar had in his whole team AND manages to weave a pretty interesting political story. And for being an "edgy" comic writer, Millar didn't take the risk to pull such a daring finish to the arc. Don't want to spoil anything but it was just what Ultimate X-Men needed right now.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Todd

    So Bendis does something in this volume that he rarely does. He writes not one but two issues that are one issue stories. He's surprisingly good at it. I'm not a fan of this Emma Frost. I remember not going one way or the other last time I read it, but now that I've read Morrison's New X-Men, it's hard to think that this Emma Frost is inexcusably bland. I think this is the most blatant they've been about Colossus' sexuality. The art is pretty awesome. David Finch is one of my favorite. So Bendis does something in this volume that he rarely does. He writes not one but two issues that are one issue stories. He's surprisingly good at it. I'm not a fan of this Emma Frost. I remember not going one way or the other last time I read it, but now that I've read Morrison's New X-Men, it's hard to think that this Emma Frost is inexcusably bland. I think this is the most blatant they've been about Colossus' sexuality. The art is pretty awesome. David Finch is one of my favorite.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Orrin Grey

    Again, I liked this volume more than just about any of the others, and I can't see anything to blame that on besides Brian Michael Bendis. Since this is his last Ultimate X-Men volume, maybe I'll trade these guys in for Ultimate Spider-Man here shortly. Again, I liked this volume more than just about any of the others, and I can't see anything to blame that on besides Brian Michael Bendis. Since this is his last Ultimate X-Men volume, maybe I'll trade these guys in for Ultimate Spider-Man here shortly.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Zach Danielson

    Brian Michael Bendis continues to shake up the Ultimate X-Men and I like it. In particular, the issue with Wolverine on his own is very grim and very good. A bunch of well-known characters make their "Ultimate" debut, and they're different enough (from their main continuity counterparts) to intrigue me. Brian Michael Bendis continues to shake up the Ultimate X-Men and I like it. In particular, the issue with Wolverine on his own is very grim and very good. A bunch of well-known characters make their "Ultimate" debut, and they're different enough (from their main continuity counterparts) to intrigue me.

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