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Fallen Son: The Death of Captain America

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The death of Captain America hits the Marvel Universe - hard! Be there as superstar Jeph Loeb teams with the industry's top artists on a story that will have everyone talking. Collects Captain America #25, Fallen Son: Death of Captain America - Wolverine, Avengers, Captain America, Spider-Man and Iron Man.


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The death of Captain America hits the Marvel Universe - hard! Be there as superstar Jeph Loeb teams with the industry's top artists on a story that will have everyone talking. Collects Captain America #25, Fallen Son: Death of Captain America - Wolverine, Avengers, Captain America, Spider-Man and Iron Man.

30 review for Fallen Son: The Death of Captain America

  1. 5 out of 5

    Jeff

    Two and a half stars Real life conversation from the bullpen at Marvel Comics, the House of Ideas: Editor 1: Ed Brubaker’s Captain America is absolutely brilliant. He’s taken a character who we basically ran into the ground with bad stories and bad villains and made him into a vital and integral part of the Marvel universe. Editor 2: Yeah, but we just killed him. Editor 1: Doesn’t matter. He won’t stay dead. He’s not the Whizzer. He’s Captain freaking America. So now we have to come up with a tribut Two and a half stars Real life conversation from the bullpen at Marvel Comics, the House of Ideas: Editor 1: Ed Brubaker’s Captain America is absolutely brilliant. He’s taken a character who we basically ran into the ground with bad stories and bad villains and made him into a vital and integral part of the Marvel universe. Editor 2: Yeah, but we just killed him. Editor 1: Doesn’t matter. He won’t stay dead. He’s not the Whizzer. He’s Captain freaking America. So now we have to come up with a tribute series. You know, where the rest of Marvel’s heroes pay tribute to the Capster, the man, the myth, the legend. Where’s Brubaker? Editor 2: He’s in a remote part of the Andes, breeding llamas and writing. Editor 1: Well, get him on the phone. Editor 2: No cell phone coverage. Editor 1: Okay. Who else is around? Editor 2 (scans office. It’s empty except for Jeph Loeb counting out the number of stapes in his stapler): Loeb. Everyone else is busy or away. Editor 1: (long pause) Give it to him, but make sure it’s not some overwrought, contrived, forced piece of hokum. The five issues contained here are set up as the five steps in the grieving process, which immediately gives this a manufactured Oprah-ish quality. The reactions of the heroes are counter to what Captain America represented and everything runs against the measured quality that Brubaker had brought into this series up to this time. Spider-Man, I’m sure Captain America would have wanted you to beat the Rhino senseless. A Rhino that simply wanted to mourn a loved one. In a cemetery. Alone. In the middle of the night. Disappointing.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Sesana

    I'm so glad I read this. I hadn't really known it existed, when I was reading through Brubaker's run on Cap, which is a shame. This is a beautifully written, heartfelt, and moving look at the sort of grief that a man like Steve leaves behind him. And it loses none of its impact for knowing how the story would eventually turn out. This is one of those rare times when an event miniseries that could have been a cash grab turns out to be a gift to the reader.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Scott

    "Where were you when Captain America died?" -- back cover blurb of Fallen Son I remember I was driving to work one morning in late 2006 or early 2007 and KYW News-Radio reported that Marvel was going to kill off the star-spangled Avenger(!). In the aftermath of his death this volume was released, detailing the grief of his current or former teammates and companions. Some of the better parts of the uneven vignettes featured a very inconsolable Spider-Man (who certainly knows about tragic loss), "Where were you when Captain America died?" -- back cover blurb of Fallen Son I remember I was driving to work one morning in late 2006 or early 2007 and KYW News-Radio reported that Marvel was going to kill off the star-spangled Avenger(!). In the aftermath of his death this volume was released, detailing the grief of his current or former teammates and companions. Some of the better parts of the uneven vignettes featured a very inconsolable Spider-Man (who certainly knows about tragic loss), Hawkeye being tempted by Iron Man with the offer of being the new Cap, and a fitting eulogy by Sam 'Falcon' Wilson during a memorial service in Washington, D.C. The illustrations during said service - recalling Cap in action during WWII - were outstanding.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Anne

    What can I say. It was a beautiful tribute to Captain America, and (I can't believe I'm admitting this) I got a little bleary eyed at the end. I'm still holding out hope that Cap makes a comeback, but if he doesn't this is a fitting ending.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Nicolo

    This is one story, which was originally presented as a five issue miniseries and collected in this softcover, I’ve wondered whether it was necessary to exist. It did serve to drive sales, identifying itself with an event that was covered by mainstream media. It had Jeph Loeb, who was not one to shy away from an opportunity to have his name appear on a best-selling comic book, providing the scrip. He is abetted by five of marvel’s biggest artists, John Romita, Jr., Leinil Yu, Ed McGuiness, David This is one story, which was originally presented as a five issue miniseries and collected in this softcover, I’ve wondered whether it was necessary to exist. It did serve to drive sales, identifying itself with an event that was covered by mainstream media. It had Jeph Loeb, who was not one to shy away from an opportunity to have his name appear on a best-selling comic book, providing the scrip. He is abetted by five of marvel’s biggest artists, John Romita, Jr., Leinil Yu, Ed McGuiness, David Finch and John Cassaday, creators whose names on the cover is almost a guarantee to sell a ton of books. The story has the Marvel superhero community dealing with the death of one of its biggest icons. In five issues, they go through anger, grief, bargaining and acceptance. It was at best, an interesting idea that could have been done in one oversized issue. But I guess an icon like Captain America deserved a miniseries to chronicle his funeral or that Marvel mine the media mileage from his death in order to sell more comic books. This is one good-looking book with fantastic art that ultimately wasn’t necessary. Cap eventually came a few years later. It wasn’t good business to have one of your most recognizable characters taking the dirt nap in his own book when a big budget movie featuring the character is playing in theaters. This would rated a two from me easy but the art pushed it to three.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Relstuart

    This follows the Death of Captain America and shows how those who knew him dealt with it. It deals with it via five stories each highlighting one of the stages of grief: denial (Wolverine), anger (Avengers), bargaining (Hawkeye), depression (Spider-Man), and acceptance (Iron Man). I thought Wolverine's comment to Spider-man about how it feels to lose someone was especially poignant.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Don

    This was a nice tribute to Captain America. I like the way they broke it up into five issues, one for each of the stages of grief - denial, anger, bargaining, depression, and acceptance. A very grown up story with characters dealing with loss. It wasn't a happy story, but it was really well told. The speech at Cap's public funeral was very well done and inspiring.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Sooraya Evans

    Never knew this volume existed. Chapter 2 was just a mess. Sea monsters and Poker? I personally loved the artwork in Chapter 4. But felt slightly disturbed when the web crawler decides to pound on the unexpected visitor. Not cool Spidey! The ending in Chapter 5 seems fitting to conclude the arc.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Nicole

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. It's rather clever to use the stages of grief as titles/themes for each installment of the story as the aftermath of Captain America's death is explored. I couldn't really take the Red Skull part of the plot seriously; it would have been more interesting for Cap to be attacked for different reasons, by a different person. When I was reading the major Civil War stories, I truly expected Cap to die during one of those battles. To be killed by one of his own comrades or former comrades (bad guys br It's rather clever to use the stages of grief as titles/themes for each installment of the story as the aftermath of Captain America's death is explored. I couldn't really take the Red Skull part of the plot seriously; it would have been more interesting for Cap to be attacked for different reasons, by a different person. When I was reading the major Civil War stories, I truly expected Cap to die during one of those battles. To be killed by one of his own comrades or former comrades (bad guys brainwashing his girlfriend doesn't count) would’ve been a truly compelling plot twist. The stories in this collection are somewhat slight, but I'll give this three stars for some of the character interaction and the background material. Not being an avid comics reader, I never knew Cap's full backstory before now. I liked the interaction between Peter Parker/Spider-Man and Logan/Wolverine; especially how Wolverine takes it upon himself to keep an eye on Peter and talk with him about the mourning process. Wolverine and Matt Murdock/Daredevil's interaction during their little adventure together was also pretty good--a couple of smart-alecs on a mission. Tony Stark/Iron Man's attempts to process Cap's death were also interesting. First, he used Wolverine as the bearer of bad news, then he tried to recruit a replacement. I liked that Tony's choice for the new Captain America saw through Tony and refused to help Tony try to make things easier on himself. However, this being the comic book universe where almost anyone can come back to life at any time, I couldn't get a true sense of finality. Even if the real Cap is truly dead, there will of course be a replacement to carry on his work. For now, I think I’ve maxed out on this storyline. Note 2014: Okay...I'll seek out the Winter Soldier storyline now that I've had a break.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Gavin

    I can't give Loeb 5 stars, Jeff is right. Brubaker should've done this. That being said, it worked pretty well, and I got a little misty eyed, even though it was contrived. Hawkeye showing up from th dead and test driving until he met Kate Bishop... Logan confirming, poker night, Namor being a voice of reason... Iron Man still a douche. Falcon well spoken, and Spidey had no reason to fight Rhino, that was bad. Logan was used very well however, to step in as a big brother figure to Peter, the one he c I can't give Loeb 5 stars, Jeff is right. Brubaker should've done this. That being said, it worked pretty well, and I got a little misty eyed, even though it was contrived. Hawkeye showing up from th dead and test driving until he met Kate Bishop... Logan confirming, poker night, Namor being a voice of reason... Iron Man still a douche. Falcon well spoken, and Spidey had no reason to fight Rhino, that was bad. Logan was used very well however, to step in as a big brother figure to Peter, the one he could've used instead of Tony, and missing with Steve gone. Also liked how Logan asked Bucky before anyone else. 4+ stars

  11. 5 out of 5

    Amy Lawrence

    that has to be near the top of my list of favourite comics

  12. 4 out of 5

    Jaime

    Wow. Just wow. This was wonderful and heart breaking. Too soon.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Christian Smith

    Story(Jeph Loeb): 9/10 Fav Artist: David Finch Iss# 4 PARENTS GUIDE Age Level: 9+ Violence: 4/10 #1 quick scene where a character is shot repetitively. Some blood. #2 a battle with a sea monster. Average blood involved. Other fight scenes Sex/Nudity: 3/10 #2 3 female characters are seen in tight costumes. #3 very brief mention about sleeping with a friends wife. Profanity: 4/10 Couple "P" "D" "A" and "H" words throughout. Nothing excessive.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Dávid Novotný

    Interesting take on dealing with death not only superhero, but mostly symbol. Five stages of grief perceived through eyes of Steve's friends. There are some weaker moments, but over and all, it works pretty well altogether. Only weak point is art, which is with exception of first issue pretty average and forgettable mainstream.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Tupac

    i love it this book I couldn´t put it down, I finished it in an afternoon, the story is very engaging.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Jerome

    The Civil War story arc got me interested in Marvel Comics again, and since they're the only company with a presence in the Nook Store, I've been able to catch up on some of their more recent graphic novels. This one was a bit shaky as a collected story (covering five individual comic books), but still flowed acceptably well. It was good, though, as a look at how Captain America's closest friends reacted to and dealt with his death.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Holden Attradies

    A really good follow up to Cap's Death and the events of "Civil war". The tone and events really shows how grown up Marvel comics can/has become. I really enjoyed the chapter that was about Spider-man, he really seems to never come out on the good end of things and his reflections really show that.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Wendy

    I wanted to like this more, but, reading this long after the book was published and subsequent events, this story ends up being a mockery thanks to typical Marvel actions. Instead of being a tribute, this serves only to diminish this entire storyline, the character and the meaning of his sacrifice.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Sara (marvelousbibliophile)

    4.5 stars I think this was my favourite Civil War arc yet! I enjoyed seeing everyone reactions to caps death, and the way they all dealt with their guilt and grief. It was a great character driven book and a great way to finish the civil war event (at least i think this is meant to be the last part). Solid read and would definitely recommend reading this if you've read Civil War.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Lusitarius

    Well that was beautiful. This comic really touched me, though I was a bit sceptic about it. It's been awhile since I read the assassination of Captain America but starting to read this comic it felt like it was yesterday. Oh god how fantastic this comic was! The emotions, all of them, were huge!

  21. 4 out of 5

    Dani (ダニ ¦ 다니)

    Sam and Tony's speeches were so sad and touching they made me cry. Literally. I've never cried reading a comic. That alone deserves 5 stars.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Jinji

    Ok, after reading 3 books of Scalped consecutively over these past weekends, I changed up the pace a bit by getting back with a superhero comic book. Captain America: Fallen Son!!! Obviously, this comes after The Death of Captain America. This book showcases how the other people around Rogers were affected by the loss. Jeph Loeb wrote 5 issues, to represent the 5 stages of loss, with 5 central characters, and 5 different artists. First is denial, with Wolverine, and drawn by Leinil Yu; Anger wi Ok, after reading 3 books of Scalped consecutively over these past weekends, I changed up the pace a bit by getting back with a superhero comic book. Captain America: Fallen Son!!! Obviously, this comes after The Death of Captain America. This book showcases how the other people around Rogers were affected by the loss. Jeph Loeb wrote 5 issues, to represent the 5 stages of loss, with 5 central characters, and 5 different artists. First is denial, with Wolverine, and drawn by Leinil Yu; Anger with The Avengers, drawn by Ed McGuinness; Bargaining with Hawkeye, drawn by John Romita Jr.; Depression with Spider-man, drawn by David Finch; And lastly, acceptance with Iron Man, drawn by John Cassaday. Losing someone is a terrible experience, and people do handle them at different paces, but all go through this 5 steps. However, these are superheroes we are talking about. They have other shit to do than to grieve. They need to get their shit together as soon as they can, and face the new world, a world without Captain America. Jeph Loeb and the artists gave this hero a proper send off and capped Cap's existence honorably. (That is until Marvel decided to bring him back)

  23. 4 out of 5

    Alicia Evans

    This is an amazing collection and I'm so glad that I got a chance to read it. We see several characters work through their loss of Captain America after the Civil War, and the book is set up as each step in the grieving process. I thought it was a wonderful send off for the character which really brings us to a place where we can move forward in the narrative. I'm curious as to how this would continue in the Captain America comics since this installment is very anti-"Steve Rogers is dead but Cap This is an amazing collection and I'm so glad that I got a chance to read it. We see several characters work through their loss of Captain America after the Civil War, and the book is set up as each step in the grieving process. I thought it was a wonderful send off for the character which really brings us to a place where we can move forward in the narrative. I'm curious as to how this would continue in the Captain America comics since this installment is very anti-"Steve Rogers is dead but Captain America lives on." For: fans of superheroes and action adventure; readers that want a closer character study or closure in the aftermath of Captain America's death. Possible red flags: violence and fighting; language; depictions of the grieving process; conspiracies.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Paul Swanson

    Do you want to know how various Marvel heroes reacted to ~tHe DeAtH oF CaPtAiN aMeRiCa~? Well... the five stages of grief (denial, anger, bargaining, depression, and acceptance) are a part of the framework that makes up our learning to live with someone we lost. They are tools to help us frame and identify what we may be feeling. But they are not stops on some linear timeline in grief. Mostly a 2 star for me. 3 or more stars for most of the art. The best of the batch are denial/Wolverine, depressio Do you want to know how various Marvel heroes reacted to ~tHe DeAtH oF CaPtAiN aMeRiCa~? Well... the five stages of grief (denial, anger, bargaining, depression, and acceptance) are a part of the framework that makes up our learning to live with someone we lost. They are tools to help us frame and identify what we may be feeling. But they are not stops on some linear timeline in grief. Mostly a 2 star for me. 3 or more stars for most of the art. The best of the batch are denial/Wolverine, depression/Spider-Man, and acceptance/Iron Man. The acceptance chapter elicited an unexpected emotional churning. Great artwork by Leinil Yu, David Finch, John Cassaday, Laura Martin, Dave McCaig, and Frank D'Armata.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Crazed8J8

    An interesting and heartfelt tribute to Captain America. Shows some of the feelings of each of the heroes that he impacted in life. The eulogy was one of the most touching parts. I appreciated seeing the lives that were touched, and how they (especially Wolverine and Spider-Man) were touched and moved by Cap. Decent art in each book, and the variant covers were amazing! The added bonus of Captain America #1 was fun too.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Shane

    It makes total sense that the aftermath of Cap's death should get an entire graphic novel. He's one of the biggest characters in the Marvel universe. And I didn't feel like this was some kind of marketing thing to sell more comics. You really feel for the characters, especially Spider-Man, as they take a break from saving the world to mourn one of the best among them.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Brent

    I got this from the library without paying attention to the fact that this takes place after the death of Captain America, and does not include the death of Captain America. Oops. Good thing it stands on its own pretty well. This is probably one of the best Marvel volumes I've ever read. Loeb takes you through the grief process through the views of various heroes on either side of the Civil War. Each hero had their own personal connection to the Cap that we see throughout their individual issues, I got this from the library without paying attention to the fact that this takes place after the death of Captain America, and does not include the death of Captain America. Oops. Good thing it stands on its own pretty well. This is probably one of the best Marvel volumes I've ever read. Loeb takes you through the grief process through the views of various heroes on either side of the Civil War. Each hero had their own personal connection to the Cap that we see throughout their individual issues, but we also see the greater gap that Cap's loss has left in the superhero world. The ways the different heroes lash out, try to move on, or simply remember their friend are powerful and emotional from start to finish. The finale does a great job of tying up Cap's public and private relations with a pair of funerals. Sam gives a moving public speech spurring people to move on and be the people Cap would have wanted them to be while Tony, off in the Arctic returning Cap's body to the sea they found him in, gives a small, personal speech as a final farewell to a long-time friend. There isn't really a lot of plot movement or character development or anything like that in this volume, but the writing of how everyone handles Cap's death is still fantastic. Rather than moving forward to a Marvel universe with Cap, this volume is like a eulogy looking back at how big of an influence Cap had on everyone. It's pretty much exactly how I would want the immediate aftermath of a major character's death to go. That being said, I would still like to actually find out how he dies sometime.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Nate Meadows

    Short but very well done, dealing with Steve Rodgers's funeral and how it affects various other heroes. Really great art! My only complaint is it should have been included in The Death of Captain America trade.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Petr

    Wow, a strong description of the world that misses its moral lantern, guiding light. I loved how the story was separated into chapters based on how people can cope with such a loss and all in all it made me appreciate Cap more than ever. You know, you never know what you had until you lose it.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Dion

    7/10 Lovely and moody and pensive. I loved the choices of viewpoints for each chapter and wanted more. But how does one survive a world war of flying bullets and then get downed by a single bullet? Not much action though, which could have improved the story.

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