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Millionaire Women Next Door: The Many Journeys of Successful American Businesswomen

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"Most Americans are not free. They are chained to their paychecks............The women profiled herein will not tolerate such an existence. They are a different breed. They are free. They are cultivators of wealth and satisfied with life." Dr. Thomas J. Stanley first swept aside the mythical magic curtain of wealth with The Millionaire Next Door, revealing just who and how "Most Americans are not free. They are chained to their paychecks............The women profiled herein will not tolerate such an existence. They are a different breed. They are free. They are cultivators of wealth and satisfied with life." Dr. Thomas J. Stanley first swept aside the mythical magic curtain of wealth with The Millionaire Next Door, revealing just who and how common the truly wealthy were in this country as well as the characteristics and habits that made them so. With Millionaire Women Next Door, he now focuses on one of the least understood but increasingly rich demographics. "Why write another book that profiles millionaires?" Stanley asks. "The vast majority of the millionaire respondents (92 percent) in The Millionaire Next Door were men............ I felt that it was indeed time for successful businesswomen of the self-made variety to be heard." And heard they are in this book that is every bit as informative and inspirational as the author's earlier works. Stanley's thoroughly researched findings and conclusions will fascinate readers everywhere. They'll definitely come away more knowledgeable and greatly inspired by women who have found the key to riches.


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"Most Americans are not free. They are chained to their paychecks............The women profiled herein will not tolerate such an existence. They are a different breed. They are free. They are cultivators of wealth and satisfied with life." Dr. Thomas J. Stanley first swept aside the mythical magic curtain of wealth with The Millionaire Next Door, revealing just who and how "Most Americans are not free. They are chained to their paychecks............The women profiled herein will not tolerate such an existence. They are a different breed. They are free. They are cultivators of wealth and satisfied with life." Dr. Thomas J. Stanley first swept aside the mythical magic curtain of wealth with The Millionaire Next Door, revealing just who and how common the truly wealthy were in this country as well as the characteristics and habits that made them so. With Millionaire Women Next Door, he now focuses on one of the least understood but increasingly rich demographics. "Why write another book that profiles millionaires?" Stanley asks. "The vast majority of the millionaire respondents (92 percent) in The Millionaire Next Door were men............ I felt that it was indeed time for successful businesswomen of the self-made variety to be heard." And heard they are in this book that is every bit as informative and inspirational as the author's earlier works. Stanley's thoroughly researched findings and conclusions will fascinate readers everywhere. They'll definitely come away more knowledgeable and greatly inspired by women who have found the key to riches.

30 review for Millionaire Women Next Door: The Many Journeys of Successful American Businesswomen

  1. 5 out of 5

    Kressel Housman

    After The Millionaire Next Door made me feel so down on myself, I wasn’t as enthusiastic about reading Millioniare Women Next Door as when I first ordered it from my library. But when it finally arrived a few weeks later, I figured I might as well bite the bullet and have another unpleasant look in the financial mirror. Surprisingly, the book turned out to be much more inspirational than the first. The author does revisit many of the same themes – the importance of thrift, the dangers of econ After The Millionaire Next Door made me feel so down on myself, I wasn’t as enthusiastic about reading Millioniare Women Next Door as when I first ordered it from my library. But when it finally arrived a few weeks later, I figured I might as well bite the bullet and have another unpleasant look in the financial mirror. Surprisingly, the book turned out to be much more inspirational than the first. The author does revisit many of the same themes – the importance of thrift, the dangers of economic outpatient care on adults – but he also includes the success stories of numerous millionaire women. And who doesn’t love success stories? More important is how the book has impacted my own life. I can name four specific ways: (1) The most practical, real-world change is that I’ve created a spreadsheet of all my credit cards and used the “chart” function to turn it into a graph. Now I’ve got a clear, visual summary of how much I owe, and my goal is to reduce that debt by 25% or more by December. I don’t know whether or not I can become a millionaire , but I do know that my first step to financial solvency is to wipe out that debt. (2) Though I haven’t done it every day, I’ve taken to writing down specific goals. Some are daily and some are long-term, but setting specific goals is one of the things successful women do routinely. (3) This one is a change of mindset. Early in the book, it states that most of these successful women don’t spend much time, if any, thinking about how their lives could have been different, and not all of them led charmed existences before becoming rich. Unfortunately, regret, specifically about sabotaging my future by messing up in college, occupies so much of my own mental energy, I’ve determined it to be my mid-life crisis. And it’s deep-seated, too. Because of the book, I began to stop these thoughts whenever I caught myself, but they came back in such a powerful dream, I woke up at 3 am from it. In the negative part of my dream, I again met the college official who interviewed me for the college I didn’t go to and now wish I had. In a positive part, though, my family members agreed that I should have a “second chance,” so I was going to go back to being 18 again. But when I woke up, I realized that if I’m ever going to get a second chance at college, it won’t be by going back in time. It has to be now. That’s as close to a “never look back” attitude as I can get to. (4) This is another mindset change, and it’s connected with the previous one. Most of the millionaire women profiled in the book run their own businesses, but most of them didn’t become millionaires until they were in their forties or fifties and usually with a few failed businesses behind them. I found that incredibly comforting in light of my own age and mistakes. Who knows what the future might hold for me? With insights like that, is it any wonder I’ve rated this book a 5?

  2. 5 out of 5

    Jay

    I have read all of Thomas Stanley’s other books, and put this one off until it had some age on it. Now that it’s about 6 years old, I read it. I was underwhelmed. I remember his other books, especially “The Millionaire Next Door”, as being a novel mix of reported research and the stories of millionaires, focused on the difference between “balance sheet” and “income statement” millionaires. I expected mostly the same here but focused on women. Here’s what I found: -Stanley quotes the research, but I have read all of Thomas Stanley’s other books, and put this one off until it had some age on it. Now that it’s about 6 years old, I read it. I was underwhelmed. I remember his other books, especially “The Millionaire Next Door”, as being a novel mix of reported research and the stories of millionaires, focused on the difference between “balance sheet” and “income statement” millionaires. I expected mostly the same here but focused on women. Here’s what I found: -Stanley quotes the research, but at times it’s a bit loosey goosey as to how he comes up with conclusions. Seems like he surveyed only the rich, but based conclusions on how they differed from the non-rich on only that data in some cases. Maybe it just wasn’t explained correctly but it didn’t seem all that clear. - More like Stanley’s “The Millionaire Mind”, he focuses this book on small business owners and the folks that are more than barely millionaires. He comes around in the final two chapters to discuss people who are not business owners that have saved the magic amount, including a teacher and a widow who made their wealth through real estate. Not being a small business owner myself, I prefer these other stories and would have liked more, but I understand from Stanley that business ownership is the most likely way to wealth. - Strangely, not every “case study” in the book is a woman. In some cases Stanley chose to profile a man to illustrate an example. If you were expecting only women to be profiled, you are out of luck here. - Also strangely, Stanley reproduces a number of letters sent to him, mostly in the middle of the book. Many of these just seemed bizarre and needn’t have been included. And many were from men. Stanley appeared to be stretching for pages here. - Stanley notes that most of the women that fit his criteria for wealth have been married. He touches on the impact of the husband on the wealth of the family, but I was left wondering, especially in the case studies, about the dynamics of married earners and investors. He really didn’t approach this topic head on. Seems like a good idea for a follow-up book, “Millionaire Couple Next Door”. I enjoyed this book, but quite a bit less than his previous books. I would recommend reading his first two millionaire books first, with this left for the curious.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Mandy

    A follow-up to "The Millionaire Next Door", "Millionaire Women Next Door" highlights the lifestyle trends of millionaires, only this time the focus is solely on wealthy women. A low profile, low consumption, frugal way of living appears to be the trend amongst the majority of these millionaires "next door". These profiled female millionaires are some of the wealthiest yet also some of the most generous givers in our country donating to charitable causes, granting forgiveness loans to friends and A follow-up to "The Millionaire Next Door", "Millionaire Women Next Door" highlights the lifestyle trends of millionaires, only this time the focus is solely on wealthy women. A low profile, low consumption, frugal way of living appears to be the trend amongst the majority of these millionaires "next door". These profiled female millionaires are some of the wealthiest yet also some of the most generous givers in our country donating to charitable causes, granting forgiveness loans to friends and family, and funding education costs for family members. On average these women live in homes valued $299,990 or less. Very few drove luxury vehicles or purchased expensive boats, gifts, or jewelry. Careers seen most among this population included small and large business owners, sales jobs, and surprisingly, educators. I found this book to contain some surprising and interesting information but also found it to be lengthy and overstated. My advice would be to read "The Millionaire Next Door" and skip the redundant "Millionaire Women Next Door".

  4. 4 out of 5

    Stephanie Snyder

    I felt like the beginning of the book had a condescending tone to it. If people want to live a high-consumption lifestyle and are happy being in debt until the day they die that's their prerogative. Just don't complain when it's retirement time and you don't have the freedom to do so. That's all I'm saying. The book, like The Millionaire Next Door, goes into detail about millionaire's habits of frugality, investing, and saving. This book goes more into detail about women but it's all the same in I felt like the beginning of the book had a condescending tone to it. If people want to live a high-consumption lifestyle and are happy being in debt until the day they die that's their prerogative. Just don't complain when it's retirement time and you don't have the freedom to do so. That's all I'm saying. The book, like The Millionaire Next Door, goes into detail about millionaire's habits of frugality, investing, and saving. This book goes more into detail about women but it's all the same information, really. I *did* however, really enjoyed the chapter on running the home office. There is so much value in taking charge of the home office that I think gets overlooked.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Shanan

    In A Nutshell: The Millionaire Next Door and The Millionaire Mind had revolutionized the way that I thought about money--or maybe it is more accurate to say that these books changed the way I aspire to approach money. No longer did it seem impossible to be financially independent even on the salary that I currently make and the salary I can hope to make in my current career (which I do love and I do feel utilizes my talents and aptitudes). But those books did have a very strong focus on male milli In A Nutshell: The Millionaire Next Door and The Millionaire Mind had revolutionized the way that I thought about money--or maybe it is more accurate to say that these books changed the way I aspire to approach money. No longer did it seem impossible to be financially independent even on the salary that I currently make and the salary I can hope to make in my current career (which I do love and I do feel utilizes my talents and aptitudes). But those books did have a very strong focus on male millionaires, and as a single mother I felt some of the principles out of my reach. So I almost jumped for joy when I saw Millionaire Women Next Door. Financially independence now feels attainable--even for me. Review: I had read both The Millionaire Next Door and The Millionaire Mind a few years back. But after some recent major changes in my life, I decided to rededicate myself to the goal of financial independence, so I checked them both out from the library to re-read. It was during the search for these two books that I found Millionaire Women Next Door. So after re-reading both of the originals, I dove into this newer installment. Reading them so closely together, I did see that there is some repetition between the three books. It makes sense because some of the principles that people follow as part of their plan for financial independence are going to be the same regardless of gender. But the repetition did get to be a little boring in certain spots. There is also a lot of quotes directly from the previous books, which is probably necessary for the people who started with this book without reading the other two. But for me, it just further accentuated the repetition. There is a large section where Thomas J. Stanley goes into detail about the difference between "Alpha" women millionaires (women who became millionaires after growing up in a loving, supportive, and in many cases frugal environment) and "Beta" women millionaires (women who became millionaires after growing up in negative and/or hostile environment). This section really hit close to home for me and really gave me insight into who I am and why I approach money in some of the ways that I do. He goes on to talk about being married to "Marginal Bob." It explained so much to me about how I ended up in the situation(s) I did. Understanding some of these things about myself have helped me as I focus on my goal of financial independence. I can see some of the areas that I have to watch for myself so they do not get out of control again. I have also been able to forgive myself for some of the mistakes of my past--with an understanding that I have to work hard to not end up in that same place a second time. As a parent, this book has also made me think of how I want my daughter to relate to money. As she gets older, I want to start to implement some of the techniques the millionaire women talked--such as open honest discussions of how money is spent as a family every paycheck.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Karin

    While this book had some good nuggets, it also had some major flaws. I enjoyed the vignettes and the basic "can-do" attitude showed in much of the book. The author had lots of examples and lots of tips to help women become millionaires. There was an amazing lack of diversity in his examples. Many of the women-while coming from "humble" beginnings, still came from a place of middle class privilege. There were so very few who crawled out of generations of poverty. And of course, only one woman of co While this book had some good nuggets, it also had some major flaws. I enjoyed the vignettes and the basic "can-do" attitude showed in much of the book. The author had lots of examples and lots of tips to help women become millionaires. There was an amazing lack of diversity in his examples. Many of the women-while coming from "humble" beginnings, still came from a place of middle class privilege. There were so very few who crawled out of generations of poverty. And of course, only one woman of color in the entire treatise. African American woman were such a small amount of woman millionaires that they didn't even get a percentage...and absolutely nothing was said about it. This still came from a middle class who was used to bootstrapping and having things happen. I vacillated between hope for the future and despair that people in general can still manage this kind of success as the gap widens between haves and have-nots. I'm not sure where to file this info in my head...

  7. 5 out of 5

    Paula Quinene

    I go through this book at least twice per year. It's very motivating in that I can identify with the "type A" women in the book. I also love the author's section on "Why not run the family office?" where she talks about stay-at-home moms. I totally agree that becoming a millionaire has much to do with the money you make...as opposed to how much money you make. I totally love this book! I go through this book at least twice per year. It's very motivating in that I can identify with the "type A" women in the book. I also love the author's section on "Why not run the family office?" where she talks about stay-at-home moms. I totally agree that becoming a millionaire has much to do with the money you make...as opposed to how much money you make. I totally love this book!

  8. 5 out of 5

    Barbara

    The dollar amounts mentioned are rather dated (the book was published about 10 years ago) but the book is still interesting. There seem to be lots of frugal women in our midst who have high incomes and low expenses!

  9. 4 out of 5

    Tamara Wilhite

    This book tried to analyze the small subset of the "Millionaires Next Door". It is forced to make general observations that you can get just as well from the main book "The Millionaire Next Door", while the specific demographic analysis has little relative value. If you want to become a millionaire by the slow and steady method, read Dave Ramsey's books for getting out of debt and building wealth. If you want to build up a small business, read Christy Wright's book "Business Boutique". And if yo This book tried to analyze the small subset of the "Millionaires Next Door". It is forced to make general observations that you can get just as well from the main book "The Millionaire Next Door", while the specific demographic analysis has little relative value. If you want to become a millionaire by the slow and steady method, read Dave Ramsey's books for getting out of debt and building wealth. If you want to build up a small business, read Christy Wright's book "Business Boutique". And if you want to understand the differences between male, female and married couple millionaires, the Chris Hogan book "Everyday Millionaires" has both more females in the sample and a more recent data set.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Judith

    This book has the same issues as The Millionaire Next Door: although it contains interesting findings, all chapters are based on the same research data (surveys, statistical data from IRS, interviews). After a few chapters, you have seen it all before. I like the focus on self-made women, mindset, entrepreneurship, and various alternative life paths that the author discusses; ranging from starting your own business, saving your normal income and investing wisely, running the family office instead This book has the same issues as The Millionaire Next Door: although it contains interesting findings, all chapters are based on the same research data (surveys, statistical data from IRS, interviews). After a few chapters, you have seen it all before. I like the focus on self-made women, mindset, entrepreneurship, and various alternative life paths that the author discusses; ranging from starting your own business, saving your normal income and investing wisely, running the family office instead of working a job to investing in real-estate to let.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Donna

    Thomas J. Stanley's book has much to offer in detailing the values and the financial discipline of not only successful businesswomen, but also the amazing discipline and tenacity of several self made multimillionaire men, and even a few women who did not work outside the home. Truly fascinating information, both in the form of statistics and of many fiscal life narratives. Full of practical, applicable habits and disciplines for every reader. Thomas J. Stanley's book has much to offer in detailing the values and the financial discipline of not only successful businesswomen, but also the amazing discipline and tenacity of several self made multimillionaire men, and even a few women who did not work outside the home. Truly fascinating information, both in the form of statistics and of many fiscal life narratives. Full of practical, applicable habits and disciplines for every reader.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Cheryl

    The first half or so, I found rather dull and full of statistics that seemed questionable as mentioned by previous reviewers. The latter part picked up though. I found it encouraging that income is not the only factor that leads to wealth. The book had a heavy emphasis on frugality, making wise choices, investing, and avoiding debt. There was even a chapter on educators, which I appreciated, since my husband and I both work in the education field.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Jenny

    A great compendium to Millionaire Next Door. It focuses mostly on women who own their own businesses, but also mentions saleswomen and women who monitor "the books" in their household. Overall, the theme is the same: live within/below your means, give charitably, and don't care what other people think. A great compendium to Millionaire Next Door. It focuses mostly on women who own their own businesses, but also mentions saleswomen and women who monitor "the books" in their household. Overall, the theme is the same: live within/below your means, give charitably, and don't care what other people think.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer

    Good balance of analytical data and personal stories. Very motivating to see how so many women have created and managed success in various types of businesses. A bit dated now, with the data from 2004 or prior; would love to see an updated edition. Plenty of data for a deep dive for those who enjoy that type of information.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Laura Isabel

    Good book The book teaches us the mindset of rich people specially women . The book doesn’t teach you any technique per se of how getting rich , however , how act and think like a rich person

  16. 5 out of 5

    Hyun Young

    Not as interesting as The Millionaire Next Door. I did not end up finishing the book as I felt many of the information did not seem very novel to me nor applicable to me. I recommend The Millionaire Next Door over this one.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Mayrlin Oscar

    Make 6,000 dollar to 8,000 dollar A Month Online With No Prior Experience Or Skills Required. Be Your Own Boss AndChoose Your Own Work Hours.Thanks A lot Here>>> Read More. Make 6,000 dollar to 8,000 dollar A Month Online With No Prior Experience Or Skills Required. Be Your Own Boss AndChoose Your Own Work Hours.Thanks A lot Here>>> Read More.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Rui Ma

    Frugal life style, spend time investing and drive to be financial indepedent

  19. 5 out of 5

    Sarah Raymer

    I could barely put this book down from the time I first started reading it. I love it. This is the first time I've ever been tempted to contact an author and thank them for their book. I could barely put this book down from the time I first started reading it. I love it. This is the first time I've ever been tempted to contact an author and thank them for their book.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Anbu Manoharan

    This book is the opposite of "I will teach you to be rich". The book does not talk about how to become a millionaire, but showcases life and lifestyle of the various millionaire women. This book is the opposite of "I will teach you to be rich". The book does not talk about how to become a millionaire, but showcases life and lifestyle of the various millionaire women.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Ukela A.

    An excellent source of mentorship for 'up and coming' successful women. I've read this book many times in the last three years. An excellent source of mentorship for 'up and coming' successful women. I've read this book many times in the last three years.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Aparna Aggarwal

    If you have read Millionaire Next Door, there is little to distinguish this one. However, the authors do mention gender specific aspects taking into account first generation female business owners.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Kara Heiss

    I read this book because a coworker recommended A Millionaire Next door. I found it to be extremely and repetitive. I understand that the book is a profile piece on the type of women who is rich in America but I do not think It was very encouraging. I also found the personal stories tiresome to read. I would recommend the books Smart Women Finish Rich and The Automatic Millionaire over by David Bach.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Rachel

    I will give this one 2.5 stars. I wasn't overly impressed with the book, simply because the information was so basic it almost seemed silly: first thing to do to become a millionaire is to own your own business, and the second thing to do is to save and invest like crazy. However, I really think it made judgments on how people should spend their money. We all enjoy different things in life. While I would certainly never spend over $100 on a watch or shoes, and I have no interest in expensive cars I will give this one 2.5 stars. I wasn't overly impressed with the book, simply because the information was so basic it almost seemed silly: first thing to do to become a millionaire is to own your own business, and the second thing to do is to save and invest like crazy. However, I really think it made judgments on how people should spend their money. We all enjoy different things in life. While I would certainly never spend over $100 on a watch or shoes, and I have no interest in expensive cars (all things he discourages), I do enjoy fashion and having nice clothes, and I love to take trips (both of which are also discouraged). A lot of the information analyzed for the book was IRS 'death/estate information' and these people had huge amounts of money when they died...3-6 million even. But I certainly hope that I do not die with that much money...I want to travel and see the world - hence spending my money. I will pay for many things for my children and ensure their education, but I do not need to guarantee them an inheritance. When they get old enough, I think they would like to come traveling with us. We all get to spend our money where we would like to. Would I have a lot more if I didn't travel and enjoy clothes? Absolutely...but what importance is it to me to get rid of those things just so I die with millions...zero importance!

  25. 5 out of 5

    Crystalee Beck

    What a powerful book for women seeking financial freedom, satisfaction in their work, and the joy of giving back. I love this book! I've been reading it as I fall asleep at night and feel inspired by the frugal and resourceful women featured herein. While the media so often portrays millionaire lifestyles as extravagant, we learn from Dr. Stanley's extensive research that many women enjoy simple, quiet, and happy lives with their families without the worries of debt or ever running out of money. What a powerful book for women seeking financial freedom, satisfaction in their work, and the joy of giving back. I love this book! I've been reading it as I fall asleep at night and feel inspired by the frugal and resourceful women featured herein. While the media so often portrays millionaire lifestyles as extravagant, we learn from Dr. Stanley's extensive research that many women enjoy simple, quiet, and happy lives with their families without the worries of debt or ever running out of money. (Things do NOT equal happiness!) Even beyond that, these millionaire women are able to give substantial amounts to causes that matter to them. Dr. Stanley packs this book full of useful nuggets, like "...in a lifetime, at least two or three ' great economic opportunities' will reveal themselves to those who are vigilant," (pg. 14) and "...you can spend your time planning for, and thus guaranteeing your next (failure) ... or you can train yourself to always focus on your dreams." (pg. 114) I will be returning to this book again in times when I need a boost of inspiration as I go after my dreams. Truly, anything is possible.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Afua

    I really wanted to like this book. "Millionaire Women Next Door": who could *not* be attracted to a book with a title like that? Unfortunately, this book did not meet my high expectations. It's a great book if you are the parent of a little girl, and want to know what to do to give her the best chance of one day becoming a self-made millionaire. It's a great book if you enjoy reading random statistics on groups of people. However, if you are already grown, if you are not the parent of a little g I really wanted to like this book. "Millionaire Women Next Door": who could *not* be attracted to a book with a title like that? Unfortunately, this book did not meet my high expectations. It's a great book if you are the parent of a little girl, and want to know what to do to give her the best chance of one day becoming a self-made millionaire. It's a great book if you enjoy reading random statistics on groups of people. However, if you are already grown, if you are not the parent of a little girl, and if you are interested in stories rather than statistics, this book is not for you. It was not for me. In fact, this is the first book in a loooooooooooong time that I gave up on; I put the book back on my shelf with 1/3 the book remaining. Some of the statistics are interesting, and the insights into the characteristics of parents of future self-made millionaires are interesting. If that was the type of information I was looking for, I would have found this book somewhat engaging.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Adriane Devries

    Thomas J. Stanley, Ph. D., author of many analytical books on the lifestyles and habits of the wealthy in America, including The Millionaire Next Door and The Millionaire Mind, has now provided this most superb insight into the Millionaire Women Next Door. It provides a voyeuristic view into what makes the female millionaire psyche: her family of origin, education, failures, and performance compared to her male peers, complete with charts and graphs and indices. Of his hundreds of in-depth surve Thomas J. Stanley, Ph. D., author of many analytical books on the lifestyles and habits of the wealthy in America, including The Millionaire Next Door and The Millionaire Mind, has now provided this most superb insight into the Millionaire Women Next Door. It provides a voyeuristic view into what makes the female millionaire psyche: her family of origin, education, failures, and performance compared to her male peers, complete with charts and graphs and indices. Of his hundreds of in-depth surveys and extensive IRS data, he found striking patterns among those women who became millionaires, who as a group are frugal wives and mothers, generous to those in need, debt-free, self-motivated, investors not only in their own businesses but also in the stock market and in commercial real estate, with a high degree of perseverance in the face of criticism and trials. This compilation inspires not only wise financial planning, but also the qualities of integrity and even faith needed to become Millionaire Women Next Door.

  28. 5 out of 5

    T.L. Cooper

    Millionaire Women Next Door by Thomas J. Stanley, Ph.D. left me amused by the thought that the typical millionaire woman next door he describes would be unlikely to read his book - or at least buy it. He covers his bases and describes attributes of myriad types of millionaire women, which is nice because it leaves hope open for anyone. Yet, there's an undercurrent to what he says that feels a little off-putting. Perhaps it's because there are moments when he talks in absolutes that feel like ove Millionaire Women Next Door by Thomas J. Stanley, Ph.D. left me amused by the thought that the typical millionaire woman next door he describes would be unlikely to read his book - or at least buy it. He covers his bases and describes attributes of myriad types of millionaire women, which is nice because it leaves hope open for anyone. Yet, there's an undercurrent to what he says that feels a little off-putting. Perhaps it's because there are moments when he talks in absolutes that feel like over-generalizations. The theme of the book seems to be the same for any millionaire next door; live below one's means, don't worry about impressing others, and be persistent. The writing is often dry and academic, but that's to be expected as it is a book reporting on research. I searched the pages for inspiration but ended the book without having an major revelations. Overall, I'd say it's an interesting look at accumulating wealth and avoiding the pitfalls of consumerism.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Naomi

    This book was very interesting and inspiring. Someone had recommended The Millionaire Next Door to me, but my library didn't have it in, so I got this one. I think his title including the word "millionaire" gives the impression that perhaps he is going to preach about chasing wealth and getting rich, which is not at all the case. He profiles the conservative and hardworking behaviors and lifestyles of people who are actually financially independent and contrasts that with what symbols society us This book was very interesting and inspiring. Someone had recommended The Millionaire Next Door to me, but my library didn't have it in, so I got this one. I think his title including the word "millionaire" gives the impression that perhaps he is going to preach about chasing wealth and getting rich, which is not at all the case. He profiles the conservative and hardworking behaviors and lifestyles of people who are actually financially independent and contrasts that with what symbols society usually interprets as denoting wealth. He is heavy on the statistics, which tends to make my eyes glaze over a bit, but it definitely lends validity to the conclusions he draws. I am inspired this week to finish up my budget for the year and make some savings and investing goals, so I would say it was a very successful read.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Danielle

    I enjoyed this book, but not because it's a "self-help" or "how-to-become-a-millionaire-yourself" read. In the first part of this book Stanley shares lots of statistics and general profiles. My favorite chapters--twelve, thirteen, fifteen, sixteen, and seventeen--profiled a few people and provided more concrete personality traits and habits that were key to each of the people Stanley profiled being successful in achieving financial independence. Like several of the other reviewers, I was especial I enjoyed this book, but not because it's a "self-help" or "how-to-become-a-millionaire-yourself" read. In the first part of this book Stanley shares lots of statistics and general profiles. My favorite chapters--twelve, thirteen, fifteen, sixteen, and seventeen--profiled a few people and provided more concrete personality traits and habits that were key to each of the people Stanley profiled being successful in achieving financial independence. Like several of the other reviewers, I was especially interested in the chapter on the woman who ran her "family office", i.e. managing all the money that came in from creating the budget to making the investment decisions. She inspired me to become more involved and investment savvy.

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